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"GOLDEN GATE CEMENT"— Successful Results Necessitate Its Use. 

THE ARCHITECT 
AND ENGINEER 
OF CALIFORNIA 

THE WORK. OF JOHN GALEN HOWARD 



JANVARY 




hAChAXV 



'PVBLI5HED 

FIFTY GENT^ A COPY 



N 5AN FRANCISCO- 

ONE, DOLLAR AND A HALF A YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND SEATTLE LOS ANfSELES VANCOUVER 



L. A. NORRIS CO. 

Clinton Welded Reinforcing System 

STEEL BARS AND CLINTON FABRIC 

CLINTON WIRE LATH 

Phone Kearny 5375 140 TOWNSEND STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ART HARDWARE 

REPRESENTATIVE FOR 

Yale and Towne Fine Hardware 
Lockwood Mfg. Go's Builders' Hardware 

DISPLAY ROOMS 
San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley 

PACIFIC HARDWARE AND STEEL CO. 



YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO PUT UP A CHEAP 

CONCRETE BUILDING 

Employ the Best Architect, Let the Job to a Reliable Contractor 
and Last, but by no means Least, Buy Good Materials. For 
Washed, Screened, Absolutely Clean Qravel and Crushed Rock, 
demand MILES. 

California Building Material Co. 

PACIFIC BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



Denison Block Company 



310-311 Ochsner Building phone 



P 



^ ,.- .- MAIN 

Sacramento, - - California 2028 



IT INTERLOCKS" 



Send for " Interloefier" Facts 



COLORADO YUL[ MARBLE 

received the largest single MARBLE CONTRACT ever 
awarded in this Country. This contract was for more than 
$1 ,000,000.00, being for the marble required for the con- 
struction of the LINCOLN MEMORIAL, Washington, 
D. C. This marble was selected after the keenest competi- 
tion and most thorough investigation by the Lincoln Memorial 
Commission composed of Ex-President Taft, Shelby M. Cul- 
lom, Joseph G. Cannon, Champ Clark and others, who sent 
to the quarries Professor George P. Merrill, Chief Curator 
of Geology of the Smithsonian Institute, who says : 

"I am very agreeably surprised at the extent of the marble beds here 
and their development. I regard the stone as of a very high grade and of 
exceptional beauty. It is remarkable for its translucency and for its clear 
white tones. In this respect it is not excelled by any white marble in 
America, and I can recall none of the foreign deposits which excel it. 
* * * * The stone is of exceptional beauty, and if adopted 

should give a structure without a rival." 

This decision was approved by the Secretary of War and 
also by the Fine Arts Commission, consisting of Daniel C. 
French, Frederick Law Olmstead, Cass Gilbert, Edwin H. 
Blashfleld and others. The contract was awarded at a pre- 
ference of over $300,000.00. 

The Colorado Yule Marble has also been approved for 
the interior of the new San Francisco City Hall and the 
new Sub-Treasury Building, San Francisco. 

AMONG OTHER NOTABLE INSTALLATIONS MAY BE MENTIONED: 

Union Pacific Building - Omaha, Neb. Boston and Newhouse Buildings, Salt Lake 

Douglass County Court House " " City, Utah 

Woodman Building - " " A. T. & S. F. Bldg. - La Junta, Colo. 

N. W. National Bank Bldg.. Portland, Ore. U. S. Postoffice - Denver, " 

Union Savings & Trust Bldg., Seattle, Wash. State Museum - - " " 

Thompson Building . Oakland, Cal. Colorado National Bank " " 

Pasadena Postoffice - Pasadena, " Municipal Building - New York City 

Merchants' National Bank, Los Angeles, " Cuyahoga Court House, Cleveland, Ohio 

Citizens' National Bank " " " Mahoning Co. Court House, Youngstown, '* 

Examiner Buildmg *' " " New City Hall - - Cleveland, " 

Southern Pacific Building, Houston, Texas and many others throughout the United States 

THE COLORADO-YULE MARBLE CO. 

Quarries and Mills at Marble, Colorado 

Analysis of The Colorado-Yule Marble Pacific Coast Representatives 

Carbonate of Lime CaC03 99.79% 

Carbonate of Magnesium MqCOj 0.15% Wf T ■pTlNJF 

Silica. Insoluble 0,04% *' • '' ' ^^^^*^ 

Iron Fe Traces IO59 Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco 

„, ,, ,. , . 9' 98% Telephone Sutter 1704 

The marble contams no foreign constit- 
uents in sufficient aniount to be liable to 

occasion appreciable discoloration or dis- 4 -w ik irrnr^/^TTT^T t 

integration on weatherini!. A. J. Ml 1 UHJl/LL/ 

(S.gTiei/) VON SCHULTZ & LOW -,-,-, r- * id -u- i » 

Denver. Colo. 222 Central Building, Los Angeles 



The Architect and Enni'ccr 



Concrete Appliances Co. 



LICENSORS OF 




OF CONVEYING AND DISTRIBUTING CONCRETE 
LOS ANGELES, GAL. 




THE OLD WAY 



I Cost to Wheelbarrow or Cart Concrete, tl to |I.7S per yar 

2. Slow and Coneested, 8 to 10 yards per hour 

3, Loss of Initial Set, Variable Multilithic Construction 
4- Causes Separation, Aids La Tcnce 

Damages Fjpor Tile. Displaces Steel and Spills Concrete 



THE NEW WAY 

Cost for Delivering Concrete, 25 to SO Cents per cubic yard 
Rapid and Efficient, 25 to 40 cubic yards per huur 
Obtain initial set. Homogeneous Monolithic Construction 
Uniform Concrete Obviates La Tence 

No Loss of Floor Tile, Displacement of Steel or Spilling 
Saves Scaffolding, Runways and Staging 
7. lamping 7. No Tamping 

A FEW BUILDINGS IN CALIFORNIA NOW BEING CONSTRUCTED BY THE G Y. SYSTEM: 



t Scaffolding, Ru 



s and Staging 



" Little Theatre " Building. Figueroa Street, Los Angeles. 

Spreckels Workingmen's Hotel. San Diego. 

California State Building, Panama-Pacific Exposition, San 

John S. Hawley, Jr. Building. Santa Barbara. 

G. M. Jones Hotel. Ocean Park. 



Diego. 



BUILDINGS COMPLETED BY MEANS OF THE GRAVITY SYSTEM: 
Ferguson Building, Los Angeles; Columbia Hospital Building, Los Angeles; Exposition Build- 
ing for the State Agricultural Park. Los Angeles; Sweetwater Dam, San Diego, Cal.; Edison Electric 
Co., Three Warehouses. Long Beach; Spreckels Theatre and Office Building, San Diego, Cal., L. H. Sly 
Apartment House, California and Powell Streets; 2ist Viaduct, Portland, Oregon (International Cent 
Co., Contractors); South Pasadena Bridge. Los Angeles. Cal. (T. H. Howaid. Contractor"); Three A 
Car Barns for Los Angeles Railway Co. (E. J. Kubach, Contractor); Mary Andre%vs Clark Memi 
Building. Los Angeles, Cal. (G. H. Whyte. Contractor). The Garland Theatre and GfTice Building. 
Angeles, Cal. (National Fireproofing Company, Contractors); Tempe Bridge, Phoenix, Arizona. 

Home office, 5th and seaton Sts., Los Angeles 

Pacific Coast representatives 

PARROTT & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
SEATTLE 



TACOMA 
SPOKANE 



PORTLAND 
LOS ANGELES 



Tlic Architect and Ent^^inccr 



MOLD and RELIABLE BELL rOUNDRY 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

CHURCH BELLS, CHIMES and PEALS 

TOWER CLOCK BELLS AND WESTMINSTER CHIMES 

COURT HOUSE and FIRE ALARM BELLS 

CHAPEL AND SCHOOL BELLS 

LIGHT HOUSE, FOG SIGNAL AND SHIP BELLS 




CATHEDRAL OF ST. HELENA, HELENA. MONTANA 



A chime of 15 bells has just been completed for the Cathedral of St. Helena. Hele 
Montana, for Rt. Rev. Bishop John P. Carroll, who writes: 



" Our chime was heralded as having no superior anywhi 
equal to the chime of the Denver Cathedral made by the sa 
ago was pronounced the best in the world. Residents of He! 
Denver chime believe ours surpasses even it in sweetness. Thi: 
pnde to the people of the city and state, but especially to Mr. C 



the world and as being 
. — which two years 
who have heard the 
I source of pardonable 
the generous donor." 



McShane Bell Foundry Co. 

Home Office and Foundries: BALTIMORE, MD., U. S. A. 



PACIFIC COAST AQENTS: 



The Standard Electric Time Co. 

461 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Telephone SUTTER 241 

PORTLAND SEATTLE LOS ANGELES 

202-204 Commercial Club Bldg. White Bldg. 706-707 Marsh-Strong BIdg. 



•iting lo Ad^ 



You 

Have 
Been 
Looking 
For It! 

A Simple Ad- 
justable Win- 
dow Shade — 
Non-breakable 
— ALL Metal 
but the Shade 
Cloth. Orna- 
ment to any 
Window. Suit- 
able for any 
Building or 
Residence. 




One Shade will 
Accomplish 

what no Num- 
ber of Other 
Shades will do. 
^ATiat is it ? 
Perfect Light. 
Perfect Venti- 
lation. Made 
of Cold Pressed 
Steel Plated to 
Match Wood 
Work. The 
Price will 
Please You. 



WRITE for 
illustrated de- 
scriptive book- 
let to 



TOP LIGHT SHADE COMPANY 

Office, 137 Market St., Oakland, Cal. Factory, 120=724 Market St., Oakland, Cal. 




A Satisfied Client is 
an Architect's Best 
Advertisement 

A Noiseless, Smooth - Running, 
Efficient Sliding. Door Helps to 
make a Satisfied Owner. That's 
WHY so manv ARCHITECTS 



SPECIFY and DEMAND 



PITCHER HANGERS 



MANUFACTURED BY 



NATIONAL MILL & LUMBER 
COMPANY 



Fifth and Bryant Streets 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



The Architect and Engineer 



Thermo Flemish 



COMPARED with Flemish bond 
walls made from ordinary bricks. 
Thermo - Flemish walls have 
many important advantages. Some of 
these advantages are: 

The proportion of Thermo-Flemish 
bricks is correct. They give the 
appearance of strength and har- 
monious balance. 

The headers, being on 17-inch centers, 
can be toned so as to suggest ver- 
tical lines and thus increase the ap- 
parent height of the building. 

Thermo-Flemish bricks are made in a 
greater variety of colors and finishes 
than ordinary bricks, afid efifects. 
hitherto impossible, can be obtained. 

The bond of Thermo-Flemish stretch- 
ers is more than twice the length of 
ordinary Flemish stretchers. The 
strength is at least four times 
greater. 

A bricklayer can build a Thermo- 
Flemish wall twice as fast as he can 
build a Flemish wall with ordinary 
brick. 

The cost of Thermo-Flemish walls is 
low, due to the rapidity of construc- 
tion and the low cost of Thermo- 
Flemish- brick. 



The hollow air spaces afford perfect 
insulation against the passage of 
heat, cold and moisture. Furring 
and lathing are unnecessar}', plaster- 
ing being done directly on the wall. 

The hollow air spaces can be used for 
pipes, wires, flues, ducts, vents and 
the like. 

Thermo-Flemish walls weigh less than 
100 lbs. per cubic foot. In steel 
structures, Thermo-Flemish walls 
effect a considerable saving in the 
amount of steel necessary. 

A Thermo-Flemish wall is twice as 
strong as an ordinary Flemish wall 
of the same thickness. Thermo- 
Flemish headers extend through the 
wall, thus securely bonding both 
sides to each other. 

Thermo-Flemish bricks and Thermo- 
Flemish walls are on exhibition in our 
salesroom, and construction details 
ma}^ be obtained upon request from 
our engineering department. Archi- 
tects, builders, owners and others in- 
terested in building construction are 
cordially invited to call and inspect 
them. Besides being interesting, the 
visit will be profitable. 



Clean-cut. icell illustrated literature zi'ill be sent on request. 

The Los Angeles, Portland and Seattle territories are still open. 
They each present an exceptional opportunity for enterprising 
men who possess character, business ability and capital. 

Write for details. 

THERMOS BRICK COMPANY 

357-365 Monadnock Building - San Francisco 



The Architect and Eii^inccr 



mm P m I C Jl White Portland Cement, Tinted a 
IVI t U U W A Warm Cream, used on this Building 



ALHAMBRA 
APARTMENTS. 
San Francisco 

J. F. Du-n. 
Architect 



t -* 




^•r i|r-'--'|||"i!:iisrT;'F!!l! 



]£& #SI 




PACIFX 

PLASTERING 

COMPANY 

Plastering 
Contractors 



This Structure Represents a New Departure 
in Apartment House Design. The Style is 
Moorish and the Architect's unusual Treat- 
ment of the Facade Afforded a Splendid 
Opportunity to Demonstrate the Artistic 
Possibilities of MEDUSA White Port- 
land Cement for Exterior Work. 

m Building Material Company 



(INCORPORATED) 



583 MONADNOCK BLDG. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



Telephone 
Sunset So. 
6358. 
Heme 24338. 




URGEST 
THEATRE 
OUTFinERS 
IN AMERICA 



DROP CURTAINS. SCENERY, SUPPLIES. DECORATIONS 



SPCCIAL WESTERN AGENTS J. B. CLANCY. SYRACUSE, 

1A.W Long Beach Ave.. Los .Anseles. 143 W. 42d St.. New York City 



502 Westbank Elder.. San It 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX 



(For Index to Ad-verti 

ARCHITECTURAL SCULPTORS. MODELING, 
ETC. 

O.' S. Sarsi, 123 Oak St., San Francisco. 

G. Rognier & Co., 233 R. R. Ave., San Mateo. 

The Schoenfeld Marble Co., 265 Shipley St., 

San Francisco. 
Western Sculptors, 533-535 Turk St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
G. Tomagnini & Co.. 219 Tenth St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

Gladding. McBean & Company, Crocker Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Independent Sewer Pipe & Terra Cotta Co., 

235 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles. 

ART GLASS 

Sylvain Le Deit, 124 Lenzen Ave.. San Jose. 

Fresno Art Glass Co., 2124 Tuolumne St., 
Fresno. 

AUTOM.\TIC SPRINKLERS 

Scott Company, 243 Minna St.. San Francisco 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 

BANK FIXTURES AND INTERIORS 

A. J. Forbes & Son, 1530 Filbert St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Fink & Schindler. 218 13th St., San Francisco. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San Francisco. 

Home Mfg. Co.. 543 Brannan St., San Fran- 

H. H.' Winner Company. Nevada Bank Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

BELTING. PACKING, ETC. 

H. N. Cook Belting Co., 317-319 Howard St., 
San Francisco. 

BELLS— TOWER, ETC. 

McShane Bell Foundry Co., 461 Market St., 
San Francisco. 



BONDS FOR CONTRACTORS 

Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland, In 

surance Exchange Bldg.. San Francisco. 
Globe Indemnity Co., Insurance Exchange Bldg. 

San Francisco. 
Massachusetts Bonding & Insurance Company 

First National Bank Bldg.. San Francisco. 
Pacific Coast Casualty Co., 416 Montgomery St., 

San Francisco. 
H. Y. MacMeans & Co.. 341 Monadnock Bldg. 



Craycroft-Herrold Brick Co., Griffith-McKenzie 
Bldg., Fresno, Cal. 

Granite Press Brick Co., Ochsner Bldg., Sacra- 
mento. 

Diamond Brick Co., Balboa Bldg., San Francisco. 

Gladding, McBean & Company, Crocker Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

Los .Angeles Pressed Brick Co., Frost Bldg., Los 
Angeles. 

Livermore Fire Brick Co.. Livermore, Cal. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery Works, Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

BRICK AND CEMENT COATING 

Wadsworth. Howland & Co., Inc. (See Adv. 
for Pacific Coast Agents.) 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Par-Seal, made by Trussed Concrete 
Steel Co. (See Adv. for Pacific Coast 
Agents.) ^ , _ 

Glidden Products, sold by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
Howard and Beale Sts., San Francisco, and 
Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., 908 Swain St., Los An- 
geles. 

BRICK STAINS 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass.. agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland. Los .Angeles. Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

Bennett Bros., agents for Sargent Hardware, 
514 Market St., San Francisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Company, San Fran- 
cisco. Oakland, Berkeley, and Los Angeles. 

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co., Commercial Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

Vonnegut Hardware Co., Indianapolis. (bee 
.Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

Western Brass Mfg. Co.. 217 Tehama St., S. F. 

BUILDING M.ATERIAL. SUPPLIES. ETC. 

Pacific Building Materials Co., 523 Market St., 
San Francisco. ., „ 

C. Torgensen & Co.. 356 Market St., S. F. 

Wektern Builders' Suppl.v Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St.. San Francisco. 

C. Roman, 173 Jessie St., San Francisco. 

C F Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst 
Bldg., San Francisco. 



All Grades of GRAVEL for CONCRETE AND ROAD WORK 



Clean Fresh Water 
Grayel from Pleas- 
anton — Healdsburg 

Roofing Gravel 

Phone Sutler 1582 



A few jobs on which our material was used: Temporary- City Hall, Masonic Temple, 

Stanford Apartments. Sixteenth Street Station at Oakland. St. Lukes Hospita . 

Lowell High School and hundreds of other first-class buildings. -Accepted on all 

City, State and United States Government work. 

FLATIRON BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
At Market. Sutler and Sansome SIreels 



GRANT GRAVEL CO. 



An Index to the Advertisements 



Page 

American Art Metal Works... 33 

American Concrete Co 159 

American Heat & Power Co . . 43 

American Keene Cement Co. . 19 

American Rolling Mill 129 

American Steel Bar Co S3 

Amweg, F. J US 

Atlas Portland Cement Co . . . 34 

Austin Cube Mixer 36 

Bacon. Ed. R 142 

Barrett & Hilp 162 

Bass-Hueter Co 23 

Bennett Bros 159 

Biggers.A.W 156 

Biturine Co 44 

Boise Sandstone Co 148 

Boscus, J. M 163 

Bowser & Co.. S. F 132 

Braun. J. G 40 

Breite. W. W 139 

Erode Iron Works 41 

Building Material Company. 

The. Inc 6 

Bullis. E. A. & Co 26 

Burdett-Rowntree Mfg. Co. . . IS 

Burlington Venetian Blind Co. 153 

Burnett Iron Works 127 

Butte Engineering Co 127 



Glidden Varnish Co 

Globe Indemnity Co 1 

Graham & Jensen ] 

Granite Press Brick Co 1 

Grant Gravel Co 

Gravit>- Spiral Chute Co 

Hammond. M. E 1 

Hardwood Interior Co 

Hauser Reversible Window. . . 1 

Hausmann. L. M ] 

Haws Sanitar>* Drinking Foun- 
tain 

HUlard. C. J.. Co 

HoUoway Expanded Metal Lath 
Co I 

Holmes Lime Co 

Home Mfg. Co 1 

Hunt. Robt. W. & Co. 

Hunter & Hudson .... 



Caementum Paint 

CaUf . Artistic Metal & Wire Co. 

California Bldg. Material Co. 

Second C( 

California Granite Co 

California Pa\-ing Brick Co. . . 
California Photo Engraving Co. 
California Plumbing Supply Co. 
CaUfomia Tile Contracting Co. 
Capitol Sheet Metal Works. . . 

Central Electric Co 

Central Iron Works 

Chahners. H. A 

Chicago Pump Co 

Chowen. W. A 

Clinton Fireproofing Co 

Coleman. Alex 

Collins Studding 

CoUman & Collman 

Colonial Fireplace Co 

Colorado Yule Marble Co. . . . 

Concrete Appliances Co 

Construction & Engineer'g Co. 

Cook. H. N., Belting Co 

Cowell Lime & Cement Co . . . 

Crane Co 

Craycroft-Herrold Brick Co.. . 
Cutler Mail Chute Co 



137 
130 

Imperial Waterproofing Co 135 

Improved Sanitar>- 'ixture Co. 152 
Independent Sewer Pipe & 

Terra Cotta Co 159 

International Concrete Con. Co 37 

In\'incible Vacuum Cleaner. . . 165 

Janris, T. P 148 

Jenkins Bros 153 

Johnson. S. T.. Co 13 

Jorgensen & Co 39 

Judson Mfg. Co 33 



" I 

130 ! 

41 I 

162 I 

139 ; 
163 
165 



38 



Dahlstrom Metallic Door Co.. 141 

Decker Electrical Co 156 

Denison Blocks 2d Cover 

Diamond Brick Co 28 

Dieckmarm Hardwood Co. . . . 128 

Dolbear Curb Bar 33 

Dudfield Lumber Co 153 

Dyer Bros 39 

Elevator Supply and Repair Co. IS 

Electric Agencies Co 149 

Electric Utilities Co 156 

Excello Mfg. Co 24 

Ferguson. W. H 164 

Fess System 151 

Fibrestone and Roofing Co . . . 11 
Fidelity and Deposit Company 

of Maryland 164 

Finch. Chas. M 154 

Fink & Schindler Co.. The.... 134 

Firex 143 

Fisher. M 163 

Fitzpatrick. F. W 24 

Flagg. Edwin H.. Scenic Co... 7 

Forbes. A. J. & Son 154 

Poster. Vogt Co 138 

Foyle. R. W ISO 

Fresno Art Glass Co 154 

Fuller. W. P., Co 25 

Gaspard & H ammond 10 

Giant Suction Cleaner Co 22 

Gladding. McBean & Co 29 



LeDeit, Sylvain 

Livermore Fire Brick Co 

Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co. 

Mackenzie Roof Co 

MacMeans Co 

Mangrum & Otter 

Marshall & Steams Co 

Massachusetts Bonding and 

Insurance Company 

McCabe Hanger Co 

McKibben & Taylor 

McLaren & Peterson 

McShane Bell Foundry 

Medusa Portland Cement 

Meek. T. H 

Meese & Gottfried Co 

Merritt Ironing Board 

Meurer Bros 

Moller. R. W 

MoUer & Schumann Co 

Monk. John 

Monson Bros 

Mortenson Construction Co.. . 

Mosaic Tile Co 

Mott Iron Works 

Municipal Engineering Co. . . . 

Muralo Co 

Musto-Keenan Co 



12 



Nason. R. N., & Co 12 

Nathan. Dohrmann Co 145 

National Lumber Co 4 

National Roofing Co 14 

Nelson. N. O 24 

Niles Sand. Gravel & Rock Co. 28 

Noble. A.E 149 

Norris Co.. L.A..Inside Front Cover 

Otis Elevator Co Back Cover. 

Otto. W. H 154 

Owsley. Bert 149 

Pacific Building Materials Co. 

3d Cover 

Pacific Coast Casualty- Co ... . 164 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co. . 36 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co 152 

Pacific Gumey Elevator Co. . . 138 
Pacific Hardware and Steel Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

PacificImp.Co 27 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Co. . . . 

Back of Cover 

Pacific Portland Cement Co. 

1st and 4th Cover 

Pacific Rolling MiUs 41 

Pacific Sanitar\' Mfg. Co 

Back of Cover 

Pacific Structural Iron Works. 159 



Page 

Pacific Sewer Pipe Co 29 

Pahn Iron Works 42 

Pahner. P. A 164 

Paraffine Paint Co 17 

Parrott & Co IS 

Perfection Reversible Window 

Co 151 

Peterson-James Co 146 

PhiUips. Chas. T 148 

Pitcher Door Hanger 4 

Pneulectric Co 149 

Prometheus Electric Co ISl 

Ralston Iron Works 42 

Ransome Concrete Co 130 

Ra>-mond Granite Co 160-161 

Reliance Ball-Bearing Door 

Hanger 1 46 

Riggs. Arthur T 139 

Roberts Mfg Co 159 

Rognier & Co 145 

Roman, C 24 

RusseU & Erwin Mfe. Co 30 

Samson Cordage Works 130 

S. F. Metal Stamping and Cor- 
rugating Co 38 

S. F. Elevator Co 162 

S. F. Pioneer Varnish Works.. 23 

Santa Fe Lumber Co 157 

Sarsi, O. S 146 

Schaer Bros 24 

Schoenfeld Marble Co 154 

Scott Co 138 

Self Winding Clock Co 156 

Shreiber & Sons Co 38 

Sound Construction Co 138 

Southern Pacific Co 133 

Spencer Elevator Co 13 

Standard Varnish Works 147 

Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery 

Works 29 

Stock. Lester H 130 

Stur^is. G. E 18 

Sunset Lumber Company 157 

Swan. Robert 146 

Swedish Metal Co 154 

Taylor & Co 13S 

Telephone Electric Equipment 

Co 24 

Thayer & Co 27 

Thermos Brick Co 5 

Tomagnini&Co 9 

Toplight Shade Co 4 

Totten Planing Mill Co 159 

Trussed Concrete Steel Co. ... 31 

TuecCo 32 

Tibbetts-OIdfield Co 161 

Union Blind and Ladder Co. . . 46 

United Materials Co 20 

U. S. Metal Products Co 167 

U. S. Steel Products Co ISS 

Utility Ga3 Generator Co 18 

Vonnegut Hardware Co 141 

Vulcan Iron Works 38 

Wadsworth . Howland & Co. . . 31 

Waters, R. J 163 

Weber. C. F. & Co 128 

West Coast Wire & Iron Works 162 

West. M. G 141 

Western Brass Mfg Co 146 

Western Building and Engineer- 
Company ISO 

Western Builders' Supply Co. . 37 

Western Iron Works 41 

Western Pacific Co 164 

Western Sculptors 150 

Western States Porcelain Co. . 28 

White Bros 126 

White Steel Sanitarj' Co 11 

Whitnev Window Co 29 

Whittier-Cobum Co 21 

Williams Bros. & Henderson.. 157 

Williams. H. S 163 

Winner Co.. H. H 145 

Wittman, LjTnan & Co 149 

Wood Lumber Co 130 

Woods & Huddart 148 

Zelinsky, D 150 



The Architect and Engineer 



G. TOMAGNINI & CO. 

ARTISTIC and INDUSTRIAL MARBLE WORK 

Statuarj-, Monuments. Mantels, Architectural Work. Garden and Hall Furniture 
219-239 TENTH ST. Phone Alarket 800S SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ARCHITECTS- SPECIFICATION INDEX-Cor 



CEMENl 

Atlas Portland Cement Co., represented by Unit- 
ed Materials Co. and Pacific Portland Cement 
Company, San Francisco. 

Mt. Diablo, sold by Henry Cowell Lime & Ce- 
ment Co., 9 Main St., San Francisco. 

"Golden Gate." manufactured by Pacific Port- 
land Cement Co.. Pacific Bldg., San Francisco. 

Medusa White Portland Cement, sold by Build- 
ing Material Co., Inc., Monadnock Bldg., San 
Francisco. 
CEMENT EXTERIOR WATERPROOF COATING 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworlh, Howland & Co. (See distributing 
Agents on page 31.) , 

Biturine Co., of America, 24 California St., San 
Francisco. 

"Impervite" sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement on page 26.) 

Imperial Waterproofing, manufactured by Im- 
perial Co., 183 Stevenson St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Par-Seal, made bv Trussed Concrete 
Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

Glidden's Liquid Cement and Liquid Cement 
Enamel, sold on Pacific Coast by Whittier, Co- 
Francisco, and Tibbetts- 



24 California 
by 



CEMENT EXTERIOR FINISH 

Biturine Company of Americ 
St., San Francisco. 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. (See list of Dis- 
tributing Agents on page 31.) 

Glidden"s Liquid Cement and Liquid Cement 
Enamel, sold on Pacific Coast by Whittier Co- 
burn Co., San Francisco, and Tibbetts-Oldfield 
Co., Los Angeles. 

Dry Mortar Colors sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. 
(See advertisement, page 26.) 

Medusa White Portland Cement. California 
Agents, the Building Material Co., Inc., 587 
Monadnock Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Concrete Cpmrnt Coatine. manufactured bv the 
Muralo Company. 340 Valencia St., San Fran- 

Samnel Cabot l^Ifg. Co.. Boston, Mass., agBncies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

CEMENT FLOOR COATING 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. (See list of Dis- 
tributing Agents on page 31.) 

Glidden's Concrete Floor Dressing, sold on Pa- 
cific Coast by Whittier, Coburn Company, San 
Francisco, and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los An- 

MoIIcr's Schumann Co., Hilo Varnishes, 1022 
Mission St., San Francisco. 

"Federal Steel Cement Hardener" manufac- 
tured bv Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleve- 
land, represented by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement, page 26.) 
CEMENT TESTS— CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 

Robert W. Hunt & Co., 251 Kearny St., San 
Francisco. 



602 



CHURCH INTERIORS ^ ^ 

Fink & Schindler, 2l8 13th St., San Francisco. 

CHUTES— GRAVITY SPIRAL 

Gravity Spiral Chutes by Minnesota Manufa 
turers' Association. G. E. Sturgis, Agt 
Mission St., San Francisco. 
CEMENT MORTAR HARDENER 

"Federal Steel Cement Hardener" manufac- 
tured by Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleve- 
land, represented by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement, page 26.) 

COLD STORAGE PLANTS 

Vulcan Iron Works. San Francisco. 
T. P- Jarvis Crude Oil Burning Co., 275 Con- 
necticut St.. San Francisco. 



Ne 



San 



sold 



CLOCKS— TOWER 

Decker Electrical Construction Ci 
Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

COMPOSITION FLOORING 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., 

Francisco. 
COMPRESSED AIR CLEANERS 

The B & W. Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, 

by Arthur T. Riggs, 510 Claus Spreckels 

Bldg., San Francisco. -r- w 

Excello Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, r. vy. 

Schaer Co., Pacific Coast Agts., Santa Maria 

Bldg., San Francisco. c c 

Giant Stationary Suction Cleaner, San fran- 

cisco and Oakland, r, ii- 

Invincible Vacuum Cleaner, sold by K. W . 

Foyle, 149 New Montgomery St., San hran- 

Tuec mfrd by United Electric Company, Coast 
Branch, (general Contractors' Association, San 
Francisco. 
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

American Concrete Co., Humboldt Bank Bldg., 

Clinwn Fireproofing Co., Mutual Bank Bldg., 
San Francisco. ^. , , „ , 

McKibben & Taylor, 2125 Shattuck Ave., Berke- 
ley 

Otto.' W. H., 269 Park Ave., San Jose. 

Barrett & Hilp, Sharon Bldg , San Francisco. 

Foster. Vogt Co.. Sharon Bldg., Sa 

P \. Palmer, Monadnock Bldg.. ba 

Ransome Concrete Co., Oakland «, 
mento. 

International Concrete Construction 
West Berkeley. Cal. 
CONCRETE HARDENERS 

"Federal Steel Concrete Hardener," 
Federal Steel Cement Mills, Clevela 
sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See ad., 

CONCRETE MIXERS 

Austin Improved Cube Mixer. Factory branch, 
temporary office, 1235 Pine St.. San Francisco. 
FTO?e Mixers sold by Edw. R. Bacon. 40 Na- 
toma St., San Francisco. 



Francisco, 
and Sacra- 



npany. 



mfd. by 
nd, Ohio, 
p. 26.) 



Underwriters' Label- 
led Fire Doors and 
Windows— Kalamein 
Interior Metal Doors 
and Trim — Melal 
Corner Bead — Metal 
Furniture, etc. 



Capitol Sheet Metal Works 

"^""'^'" SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 



10 



The Architect and Ensiineer 



Telephone Sutter 4765 

QASPARD 



«& HAM/VIOIND 



BUIUDirNQ COMSTRUCTIOrV 

425 Sharon Building, 55 New Montgomery St. San Francisco, Cal. 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFI 

CONCRET?: PILES 



McArtlu 



Ci 



Building, San Fr 



Pile Company, Chr 



CONCRETE POURING APPARATUS 
Concrete Appliances Co., Los Angeles 

& Co., Coast Representatives, San 

Portland. Seattle. 
CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT 

United States Steel Products Co., S 

Cisco, Los Angeles, Portland and i 
Clinton Welded Reinforcine System. L 

ris, 140 Townsend St., San Francis 
-Kahn System," see advertisement on 

this issue. 



page 



International Fabric & Cable, represented by 
Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New M— * 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Triangle Mesh Fabric. Sales Agents, Pacific 
Building Materials Co., 523 Market St., San 

Twisted Bars, sold by Woods & Huddart, 444 
Market St.. San Francisco. 
CONCRETE SURFACING 

"Biturine." sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 
California St., San Francisco. 

"Concreta" sold by W. P. Fuller & Co., San 
Francisco. 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co.'s Bay State Brick 
and Cement Coating, sold by R. N. Nason & 
Co., San Francisco and Los Angeles. 

Glidden Liquid Cement, manufactured by Glid- 
den \'arnish Co., Whittier. Coburn Co San 
Francisco, and Tibbetts-OIdfield Co., Los An- 
geles. 

Moller & Schumann, 1023 Mission St., San 
Francisco. 

CONTRACTORS, GENERAL 

American Concrete Co., Humboldt Bank Bldg , 
San Francisco. 

Barrett & Hilp. Sharon Bldg.. San Francisco 

Arthur W. Diggers. 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

CoIIman & Collman, 526 Sharon Bldg.. San 
Francisco. 

Construction & Engineering Co., Hobart Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

M. Fisher, California-Pacific Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Foster, Vopt Co., Sharon Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Gaspard & Hammond, Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 
Cisco. (See card above.) 

Howard S. Williams, Hearst Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Lester Stock, 12 Geary St., San Francisco. 

McLaren S; Peterson, Sharon Bldg.. San Fran- 
cisco. 

R. W. Moller, 185 Stevenson St., San Francisco 

John Monk. 2016 Vallejo St., San Francisco. 

Monson Bros 1907 Bryant St.. San Francisco. 

Burt T. Owsley, 311 Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 

Ransome Concrete Co.. 1218 Broadwav. Oakland 
bound Construction Co., Hearst Building, San 

Francisco. 
Western Building &• Engineering Co., 455 Phelan 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Williams Bros. & Henderson, Holbrook Bldg., 



CATION INDEX-Con«ina«d 

CORK FLOORING 

"Linotile." manufactured by Armstrong Cork & 
Insulation Company. M. C. Van Fleet, agt., 
120 Jessie St., San Francisco. 
CORNER BAR 

Dolbear Curb Bar, manufactured by American 
Steel Ear Co., 1034 Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
CORNER BEAD 

United States M'etal Products Co., 525 Market 
St., San Francisco.; 750 Keller St., San Fran- 

CRUSHED ROCK 

Grant Gravel Co., Flat Iron Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Niles Rock, sold by California Building Ma- 
terial Company, Pacific Bldg., San Francisco. 

Niles Sand, Gravel & Rock Co., Mutual Bank 
Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 



rrancisco. 
DAMP-PROOFING COMPOUND 

Biturine Co. of America, 24 California St., 
San Francisco. 

Glidden's Liquid Rubber, sold on Pacific Coast 
bv Whittier, Coburn Company, San Fran- 
cisco, and Tibbetts-OIdfield Co., Los Angeles. 

Imperial Co., 183 Stevenson St., San Francisco. 

"Impervite," sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
adv. on page 26.) 

Trus-Con Damp Proofing. (See advertisement 
of Trussed Concrete Steel Company for Coast 
agencies.) 

"Pabco" Damp Proofing Compound, sold by 
Paraffine Paint Co., 34 First St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co.. Inc., 84 Washing- 
ton St., Boston. (See Adv. for Coast agen- 

DOOR HANGERS 

McCabe Hanger Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y. 

Pitcher Hanger, sold by National Lumber Co., 
Fifth and Brvant Sts., San Francisco. 

Reliance Hanger, sold by Sartorius Co., San 
Francisco; D. F. Fryer & Co., Louis R. Be- 
dell, Los Angeles, and Portland Wire & Iron 
Works. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Haws Sanitary Fountain, 1808 Harmon St., 
Berkeley, and C. F. Weber & Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 

N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Crane Company, San Francisco, Oakland, and 
Los Angeles. 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Co., 67 New Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco. 
DUMB WAITERS 

Spencer Elevator Company, 173 Beale St., San 
Francisco. 

Burdett-Rowntree Mfg. Co., Underwood Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Butte Engineering Co., 683 Ho 



Central Electric Co., 185 St 



rd St., San 
St., San 



Scott Co., Inc., 243 Mil 

P.icific Fire Extinffuishei 

St.. San Francisco. 



Co., 507 Montgon 



MORTENSON CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CONTRACTORS FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL AND IRON 

H. MORTENSON, Pres. CHAS. G. MORTENSON, Vice-Pres, .and Mgr, 

OFFICE AND shops: CORNER 19TH AMD INDIANA STREETS 

'hones: Mission 5033— Home M 3916 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Tlie Architect and Engineer 



11 



"FIBRESTONE" 



SANITARY FLOORING, WAINSCOT AND BASE. 



Laid Exclusively by 



Tel. Sutter 329 



AKCMITECTS- SPECIFICATION INDEX-Confinued 

FIXTURES— BANK, OFFICE, STORE. ETC. 
A. J. Forbes & Son, 1530 Filbert St.. San Fra 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 

Albert E. Noble, 173 Jessie St., San Francisco. 
Chas. T. Phillips. Pacific lildg., San Francisco. 
ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

Roberts Manufacturing Company, 663 Mission 
St., San Francisco. 
ELECTRIC I'LAIE WARMER 

The Prometheus Electric Plate Warmer for 
residences, clubs, hotels, etc. Sold by M. E. 
Hammond, Humboldt Bank BIdg., San Fran- 

ELEVATORS 

Otis Elevator Company, Stockton and North 

Point, San Francisco. 
Spencer Elevator Company, 126 Beale St., San 

Francisco. 
San Francisco Elevator Co., 860 Folsom St.. 

San Francisco. 
Pacific Gurney Elevator Co., 186 Fifth St., San 
Francisco. 
ELEVATORS, SIGNALS, FLASHLIGHTS AND 
DIAL INDICATORS 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co., Underwood Bldg.. 
San Francisco 
ENGINEERS 

F. J. Amweg, 700 Marston Bldg., San Fran- 

V/. W.' Breite, Clunie Bldg., San Francisco. 
L. M. Hausmann, Sharon Bldg., San Francisco. 
Chas. T. Phillips, Pacific Bldg., San Francisco. 
Hunter & Hudson. Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 
EXPRESS CALL SYSTEM 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co., U'nderwood 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
FIRE EXIT DE\'ICES 

\'on Uuprin Self.Releasing Fire Exit Devices, 

Vonnegut Hardware Co. (See Adv. for Coast 

Agencies.) 
FT"E ESCAPES 

Burnett Iron Works, Fresno, Cal. 

Pacific Structural Iron Works, Structural Iron 

and Steel. Fire Escapes, etc. Phone Market 

U74; Home J. 3435. 370-84 Tenth St., San 

Francisco 
Palm Iron & Bridge Works, Sacramento. 
Western Iron Works, 141 Eeale St., San Fran- 

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

Scott Company, 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 
Pacific Fire E.\tinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 
FIRE BRICK 

Livermore Fire Brick Co.. Livermore, Cal. 
FIREPLACE DAMPER 

Head, Throat and Damper for open fireplaces. 
Colonial Fireplace Co.. Chicaso. (See adver- 
tisement tor Coast aaencie^.l 
FIREPROOFING AND PARTITIONS 
Gladding. McBean & Co., Crocker Bids 

Francisco. 
Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co.. Frost 
Los Anireles, 
FIREPROOF PAINT 



., San 
Bldg., 




Fink & Schindler. 218 13th St., San Francisco. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St.. San Fran 

Cisco and 210 N. Main St., Los Angeles. Cal. 

T. H. Meek Co.. 1157 Mission St., San Fran. 

FLOOR VARNISH 

Bass-Hueter and San Francisco Pioneer Varnish 

Works, 816 Mission St., San Francisco. 
R. N. Nason & Co., 151 Potrero Ave., San 

Francisco. 
Standard Varmsh Works, Chicago, New York 

and San Francisco. 
Moller & Schumann Co., 1022 Mission St., San 

Francisco. 
Glidden Products, sold by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
San Francisco, and Tibbetts-OIdfield Co., Los 
Angeles. 
FLOORING— MAGNESITE 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 
FLUMES 

California Corrugated Culvert Co., West Berk- 
eley, Cal. 
GARAGE EQUIPMENT 

Bowser Gasoline Tanks and Outfit, Bowser & 
Co.. 612 Howard St., San Francisco. 
GARDEN FL'RNITURE 

G. Tomagnini & Co., 219 Tenth St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
O. S. Sarsi, 123 Oak St., San Francisco. 
GAS AND ELECTRIC FIXTURES 



Roberts M'anufacturing 
Cisco and Oakland. 
GAS GENERATORS 

Utility Gas Generator Co. 
San Francisco. 
GLASS 

W. P. Fuller & Company, 



npany. 



cities. 
Whittier-Coburn Co., 

Francisco. 
GRANITE 

California Granite Co, 



Ra 



IISCO. 



San Ft, 



id Granite Co 



Ho 



Di' 



principal Coast 
rd & Beale Sts., San 



Bldg., San Fran- 

and Potrero Sts., 



GRAVEL, SAND AND CRUSHED ROCK 

California Building Material Co., Pacific Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

Del Monte White Sand, sold by Pacific Improve- 
ment Co.. Crocker Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg.. San 
Francisco. 

Grant Gravel Co., Flatiron Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Niles Sand. Gravel & Rock Co.. Mutual Savings 
Bank Bldg., 704 Market St., San Francisco. 

GRA\ITY CHUTES 

Gravity Spiral Chutes, sold by G. E. Slurgis' 
Supply House, 602 Mission St., San Francisco. 



' Cabinets and Mirrors are the last word 
Sweet's 1914 Catalog. Pages 1054-1055 c 



■■White-Steel" Mcdi< 
Bathroom ETuipment. E 
full information. 

"WHITE-STEEL" SANITARY FURNITURE CO. 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Northern California Southern California 

Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co. H. R. Boynton Company 

San Francisco. Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 



12 



The Architect and Engineer 



Clarence E. Musto. Pn 



JosKPH B. Keenan. Vice-Pfi 



JOSEPH MUSTO SONS=KEENAN CO. 



Phone Franklin 
6365 



MARBLE 



OFFICE AND MILLS: 

535-565 North Point St., 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ARCHITECTS' SFECIFI 

HARDWALL PLASTER 

Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Co., San Francisco. 
American Keene Cement Co.. 333 Monadnock 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
"Empire" Hardwall Plaster, Pacific Portland 

Cement Company, Pacific Bldg., San Fran- 

HARUWARE 

Russwin Hardware, Joost Bros., San Francisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Los Angeles and 
San Diego. 

Sargent's Hardware, sold by Bennett Bros., 514 
Market St., San Francisco. 

Western Brass Mfg. Co., 217 Tehama St., S. F. 
HARDWOOD FLOORING 

Parrott & Co., 330 California St., San Francisco 

White Bros.. Cor. Fifth and Brannan Sts., San 



CATION INDEX— Continued 

LIME 

Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Co.. 9 Ma 
San Francisco. 
LIGHT, HEAT AND POWER 



Hardwood Interior Co., 554 Bryant St., 



d Taylor 
an Fran- 
San 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 

Dieckmann Hardwood Co., Bi 

Sts., San Francisco. 
Parrott & Co.. 320 California St., San 

Cisco. 
White Bros., Cor. Fifth and Brannan Sti 

Francisco. 
HEATERS— AUTOMATIC 

Pittsburg Water Heater Co., 237 Powell St., 

San Francisco. 
Hoffman Heaters, factory branch, 397 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 
HEATING AND VENTILATING 

American Heat & Power Co., Oakland, Cal. 
J. M. Boscus, 975 Howard St.. San Francisco. 
Fess System Co., 220 Natoma St., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter, Inc., 507 Mission St., San 

Francisco. 
Charles T. Phillips, Pacific Building, San Fran- 

i St.. San Francisco. 
341 Minna St., San 
Francisco. 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 

St., San Francisco. 
Petersen-James Co., 710 Larkii 



St., San 



HOLLOW BLOCKS 

Denison Hollow Interlocking Blocks, 310 Ochs- 
ner Bldg., Sacramento, and Chamber of Com- 
merce Bldg.. Portland. 
INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 

Robert W. Hunt & Co., 251 Kearny St., San 
Francisco. 
IRONING BOARDS 

M'erritt Patent Ironing Board, sold by A. Hom- 
niel, agent, Atlanta Hotel, San Francisco. 
JOIST HANGERS 

Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 
KEENE CEMENT 

American Keene Cement Co., Monadnock Bldg., 
San Francisco, 
LIGHTING FIXTURES 

Roberts Manufacturing Co., 663 Mission St., 
San Francisco. 



Pacific Gas & Elec. 


Co., 445 Sutter St., 


P'rancisco. 




JxMBER 




Dudfield Lumber Co 


, Palo Alto, Cal, 


Sunset Lumber Co., 


Oakland, Cal. 


Santa Fe Lumber Co 


, Seventeenth and De 



Sts 



Haro 



Wood Lvimber Company, East Oakland, 
California, 
MILL WORK 

Totten & Brandt Planing Mill Co., Stockton. 
Taylor & Co., 2001 Grand St., Alameda: 
MAIL CHUTES 

Cutler Mail Chute Co., Rochester, N. Y. (See 
page 38 for Coast representatives.) 



Adv. 
MANTELS 

Mangrum & Ott. 



561 Mission St., Sa 



Bldg., 



M \i;i:lf: 

Colorado Vule Marble Co., Monadnock 

San Francisco. 
S'-hoenfeld Marble Company, San Frai 

(See advertisement, page 154.) 
Joseoh Musto Sons-Keenan Co., 535 

Point St., San Francisco. 
G. Tomagnini & Co., 219 Tenth St., San 



MEDICINE CABINETS 

White Steel Sanitary Furniture Co., rep. b 
Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co., San Francisci 
METAL AND STEEL LATH 

"Steelcrete" Expanded Metal Lath, sold b 
Holloway E.xpanded Metal Company, Mona( 
nock Bldg.. San Francisco. 
L. A. Norris & Co., 140 Townsend St., Sa 
Francisco. 
METAL CEILINGS 
San Francisco Metal 
Co., 2269 Folsom St., 
METAL DOORS AND WINDOWS 

U. S. Metal Products Co., 525 Market St., Sa 



Sta 



ng & 



Dahlstrom Metallic Door Co., Western office, 
with M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San 
Francisco. 
METAL FURNITURE 

M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San Francisco. 

Chas. M. Finch, 311 Board of Trade Bldg., San 

METAL SHINGLES 

Meurer Bros., 630 Third St., San Francisco. 
San Francisco Metal Stamping & Corrugating 
. Co., 2269 Folsom St., San Francisco. 
MORTAR COLORS 

Dry Mineral Dyes, sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. 
(See adv., page 26.) 
OIL BURNERS 

American Heat & Power Co., Seventh and Cedar 

Sts., Oakland. 
S. T. Johnson Co. (see adv. below). 
Fess System Co., 220 Natoma St., San Fran- 



cisco. 
T. P. Ja 



Crude Oil Eur 



Co., 275 Con- 



HERE IT IS 



MADE IN CALIFORNIA, TOO ! 



A High Class Washable Paint for Inside Walls. 

OPAQUE FLAT FINISH 

Less material required to cover surface than any similar product on the market. 

R. N. NASON & CO., F^-'s*,! P°'nrsVr%"et SAN FRANCISCO 



TJiC Architect and Eiii:;iiu-cr 



13 



MADE IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PASSENGER ^FREIGHT ELEVATORS 

INVESTIQATE OUR PRODUCT 

SPENCER ELEVATOR COMPANY 

126-128 Beale Street, SAN FRANCISCO Phone Kearny 664 

ARCHITECTS- SPECIFIC 

ORNAMENTAL IRON AND BRONZE 
American Art Metal Works, 13 Grace 



A.TION INDEX-Continued 

PA\ING BRICK 

California Brick Company, Plielan Eldg., Sa 



Erode Iron Works. 

Francisco. 
Burnett Ir 
Palm Iron 
California 

enth St., 
J. G. Brau 
RaJ_ston Ire 
Cisco, 



31-37 Hawtho 



& Bridge Works, Sa 



Metal & Wire Co., 349 Se 



Mo 



ch Ir 



Works, 1165 Howard St.. Sa 



C. J. Hillard Company, Inc., 19th and Minr 
sota Sts., Sain Francisco. 
Mber & Sons Co., represented by Weste 



San 



rks. 861-863 Ho 



California 



Supply Co 

West Coast Wire & I 
ard St.. San Francisco. 

\'ulcan Iron Works. San Francisco. 
PAINTING AND DECORATING 

D. Zelinsky, 564 Eddy St.. San Francisco, 

Robert Swan. 1133 E. 12th St., Oakland. 
PAINT FOR BRIDGES 

Biturine Company of 

St.. San Francisco. 

PAINT FOR CEMENT 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworth, Rowland & Co. (Inc.). (See Adv. 
in this issue for Pacific Coast agents.) 

"Biturine," sold by Buturine Co. of America, 
24 California St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Stone Tex., Trussed Concrete Steel 
Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

Glidden's Liquid Cement, sold on PaciHc Coast 
by Whittier, Coburn Companv, San Francisco 
and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los Angeles. 

Concreto Cement Coating, manufactured by the 
Muralo Company, 540 Valencia St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Moller & Schumann Co., Kilo Varnishes, 1022 
Mission St., San Francisco. 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

"Technola," a cement paint, sold by C. Roman, 
San Francisco. 
PAINT FOR STEEL STRUCTURES 

"Biturine," sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 
California St.. San Francisco. 

Carbonizing Coating. Made by Goheen M'fg. 
Co., Canton, Ohio. C. W. Coburn & Co., 320 
Market St., San Francisco, and A. .T. Capron, 
Ainsworth Bldg.. Portland. Agents. 

Trus-Con Bar-Ox. Trussed Concrete Steel Co. 
(See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

Glidden's Acid Proof Coating, sold on Pacific 
Coast by Whittier. Coburn Company, San 
Francisco, and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los An- 
geles. 
PAINTS. OILS. ETC. 

Bass-Heuter Paint Co.. Mission, near Fourth 



nd Beale Sts., 



St.. San Francisco. 
Whittier-Coburn Co., Hom 



W. P. Fuller & Co., all principal Coast cities. 

"Biturine," sold by Biturine (To. of America, 24 
California St., San Francisco. 

Glidden Varnish Co., Cleveland, Ohio, repre- 
sented by Whittier-Coburn Co., San Francisco 
and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los Angeles. 

Moller & Schumann Co., 1022 Mission St., San 
Francisco. 

Paraffine Paint Co., 38-40 First St., San Fran- 

R. N. Nason Co., San Francisco. 
Standard Varnish Works, 113 Front St.. San 
Francisco. 



PHOTO ENGRAX'ING 

California Photo Engraving Co., 121 Se 



nd St., 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

R. J. Waters Co., 717 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
PIPE— VITRIFIED SALT GLAZED TERRA 
COTTA 

Gladding, McBean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Pacific Sewer Pipe Co., I. W. Hellman Bldg., 

Los Angeles. 
Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
PLASTER CONTRACTORS 

A. Knowles, 985 Folsom St., San Francisco. 
PLUMBERS' MARBLE HARDWARE 

Western Brass Mfg. Co., 217 Tehama St., S. F. 
PLUJIBING 

Boscus Bros., 975 Howard St., San Francisco. 
Scott Co., Inc., 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 
Peterson-James Co.. 7T0 L? rkin St., San Fran- 



Wittman, Lyman & Co., 341 Mi; 



St., 3„n 



Alex Coleman. 706 Ellis St.. San Francisco 
PLUMBING FIXTURES. MATERIALS. ETC. 

Crane Co.. Second and Brannan Sts., San Fran- 
cisco. 

N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

California Steam Plumbing Supply Co., 671 
Fifth St., San Francisco. 

J. L. Mott Iron Works, D. H. Gulick, selling 
agent, 135 Kearny St.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturiiig Co., 67 New 
Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Western States Porcelain Co., San Pablo, Cal. 




Crude Oil Burners Oporating Kitchen Ranges in 

Government Barracks at Fort Winfield Scott 

OIL BURNERS 

Modern EQUIPMENTS for 

Cooking and Heating Plants 

S. T. JOMNSOIN CO. 

1337 MISSION ST. 945 GRACE AVE. 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 



14 



The Architect and Engineer 



Phone Lakeside 91 



INational Roofing: Company 

ROOFING AND COMPOSHION FLOORING 
EVERYTHING IN ROOFING 

PLAZA BLILDINQ. Fifteenth and Washington Streets. OAKLAND 



ARCHITECTS' SFECIFICATION INDEX-Continued 



POTTERY 

Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 
Cldg.. San Francisco. 
PUMPS 

Chicago Pump Company, 612 Howard street. 
San Francisco. 
REFRIGERATORS 

McCray Refrigerators, sold by Nathan Dohr- 
mann Co., Geary and Stockton Sts., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Vulcan Iron Works, San Francisco. 
RENERSIBLE WINDOWS 

Hauser Reversible Window Company, Balboa 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
RE\OL\ING DOORS 

Van Kennel Doors, sold by U. S. Metal Prod- 
ucts Co., 525 Market St., San Francisco. 
ROCK BREAKING MACHINERY 

Vulcan Iron Works, Francisco and Kearny St: 
San Francisco. 
ROLLING DOORS, SHUTTERS, PARTITIONS 
ETC. 

Pacific Building Materials Co., 523 Market St. 

San Francisco . 
C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran 

Union Blind and Ladder Company, manufac- 
turers of the Acme rolling partitions for 
churches and schools, 3535 Peralta St., Oak- 
land. 

Kinnear Steel Rolling Doors. W. W. Thurston, 
agent. Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 

Wilson's Steel Rolling Doors. U. S. Metal Prod 
ucts Co., San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
ROOFING AND ROOFING MATERIALS 

Biturine Co. of America, 24 California St., San 
Francisco. 

Grant Gravel Co., Flat Iron Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Fibrestonc & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

National Roofing Company, Plaza Bldg., Oak- 
land. 

"Ruberoid," manufactured by ParafEne Paint 
Co.. San Francisco. 

Mackenzie Roof Co., 425 13th St.. Oakland. 

United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 
ROOFING TIN 

American Sheet & Tin Plate Co.. Pacific Coast 
representatives, U. S. Steel Products Co.. San 
Francisco, Los Angeles. Portland and Seattle. 

Meurer Eros.. A. H. MacDonald, agent, 630 
Third St., San Francisco. 
SAFES, VAULTS, BANK EQUIPMENT 

M. G. West Co., 353 Market St.. San Francisco. 
SANITARY DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Haws' Sanitarv Drinking Faucet Co., 1808 Har- 
mon St.. Berkeley. 
SANITARY BATH FINTURE 

"Boudoir" bath tub. mfrd. by Improved Sanitarv 
Fixture Co., 411 S. Los Angeles St., Los 
Angeles. Sold by all plumbing houses. 



S.\SH CORD 

Regal Sash Cord, Louisville Selling Co. repre- 
sented on Pacific Coast by Baker & Hamilton. 
Samson Cordage Works, manufacturers of Solid 
Braided Cords and Cotton Twines, 88 Broad 
St.. Boston, Mass. 
SCENIC PAINTING— DROP CURTAINS, ETC. 
The Edwin H. Flagg Scenic Co., 1638 Long 
Beach Ave., Los Angeles. 
SCHOOL FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES 

C. F. Weber & Co.. 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco; 512 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 
SEWAGE EJECTORS 

Chicago Pump Co., represented by Telephone 
Electric Equipment Co., 612 Howard street, 
San Francisco. 
SHE.\TH1NG AND SOUND DEADENING 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland. Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 
SHEET METAL WORK. SKYLIGHTS. ETC. 
Capitol Sheet Metal Works, 1927 Market St., 

San Francisco. 
U. S. Metal Products Co., 525 Market St., San 
Francisco. 
SHINGLE STAINS 

Cabot's Creosote Stains, sold by Waterhouse & 
Price, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Port- 

STEEL AND IRON— STRUCTURAL 

Burnett Iron Works, Fresno, Cal. 

Central Iron Works, 621 Florida St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Dyer Bros., 17th and Kansas Sts., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Erode Iron Works, 31 Hawthorne St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Judson Manufacturing Co., 819 Folsom St., San 



M 



Francisco, 

Construction Co, 
San Francisco. 
Mott Iron Works. D 



19lb and Indiana 



135 Ke 



St.. Sa 



H. Gulick, agents, 
h and Mississippi Sts., 



Pacific Rolling Mills, 

San Francisco. 
Pacific Structural Iron Works, Structural Iron 

and Steel. Fire Escapes, etc. Phone Market 

1374; Home, J. 3435, 370-84 Tenth St., San 

Francisco. 
Palm Iron & Bridge Works, Sacramento. 
Ralston Iron Works, Twentieth and Indiana Sts., 

San Francisco. 
U. S. Steel Products Co., Rialto Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Schreiber & Sons Co., represented by Western 

Builders Supplv Co.. S. F. 
Vulcan Iron Works. San Francisco. 
Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 

Woo'ds' & Huddart, 444 Market St.. San Fran- 
cisco. 
STEEL PRESERVATIVES 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St.. San Francisco. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co.. Boston Mass. (See 
.Adv. for Coast agencies.) 



CALIFORNIA ARTISTIC METAL&WIRECa 

J.T.MCCO.RMICK- Pnesidenl: 

ORNAMENTAL IRON & BRONZE WORK 

34^9-365 SEVENTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO. 

telephone: MARKET 2162 



The Architect and Engineer 



COLLINS PRONG STUDDING 




NO MORE TIEING 

ON OF LA TH. 
NO MORE SKIP- 
PING ON TIEING, 
CAUSING SAGS and 
BULGY DEFECTS 
IN PLASTER. 
SIMPLY BEND THE 
PRONG. 



PARROTT & CO. 

320 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone : Douglas 2400 

Seattle, Tacoma, Spokane, Portland, Los Angeles 
and San Diego 




Burden Rou-ntree Pneumatic Door Operating Dei 



BURDETT 
ROWNTREE 
MFG. CO. 



Dumbwaiters 

Door Operating Devices 

Elevator Interlocks 

323 Underwood Building, 
525 Market Street 

Phone Douglas 2S9S 

San Francisco, - - Cal 




ELEVATOR 
SUPPLY & 
REPAIR CO. 

Elevator Signals 
Elevator Accessories 
Xorton Door Closers 

323 Underwood Building, 
525 Market Street 

Phone Douglas 2898 

San Francisco, - - Cal. 



16 



The Architect and Eiisi'icer 



ARCHITECTS" SPECIFICATION INDEX-Cont.nued 



STEEL BARS FOR CONCRETE 

Kahn and Rib Bars, made by Trussed Concrete 

Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
Woods & Huddart, 444 Market St., San Fran- 

STEEL MOULDINGS FOR STORE FRONTS 
J, G. Braun, 537 W. 35th St., New York, and 
615 S. Paulina St.. Chicago. 
STEEL FIREPROOF WINDOWS 

United States Metal Products Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los ."Kngeles. 
STEEL STUDDING 

Collins Steel Partition. Parrott & Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 
STEEL ROLLING DOORS 

Kinnear Steel Rolling Door Co.. W. W, Thurs- 
ton. Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 
STONE 

California Granite Co., 518 Sharon Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Boise Sandstone Co., Boise, Idaho. 
Raymond Granite Co., Potrero Ave. and Division 

St., San Francisco. 
Colusa Sandstone Co.. Potrero Ave. and Di- 
vision St., San Francisco. 
STORAGE SYSTEMS 

S. F. Bowser & Co., 612 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 
SLTRETY BONDS 

Globe Indemnity Co., Insurance Exchange Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
H. Y. MacMeans & Co., Monadnock Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Massachusetts Bonding & Insurance Co., First 

National Bank Bldg., San Francisco. 
Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Pacific Coast Casualty Co., Merchants' -Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
THEATER AND OPERA CHAIRS 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT 

Telephone Electric Equipment Co., 612 Howard 
St., San Francisco. 
TILES. MOSAICS. MANTELS. ETC. 

California Tile Contracting Company, 206 Shel- 
don Bldg., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
The Mosaic Tile Co., 230 Eighth St., San Fran- 

TILE'FOR ROOFING 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 

Francisco. 
Gladding. McBean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 
TILE WALLS— INTERLOCKING 

Denison Hollow Interlocking Blocks, Ochsner 

Bldg., Sacramento. 
Thermos Brick Co., Monadnock Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
TIN PLATES 

American Tin Plate Co., Riato Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 
VITREOU.S CHINAWARE 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Company, 67 New M'ont- 

gomerv St., San Francisco. 
Western States Porcelain Co., Richmond. Cal. 
VACUUM CLEANERS 

The Vak-Klean \'acuum Cleaner. Pneulectric 

Co., Pacific Coast Agts., 943 Phelan Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Giant Stationary Suction Cleaner, manufactured 

by Giant Suction Cleaner Co., 731 Folsom 

St., San Francisco and Third and Jefferson 

Sts., Oakland. 
Invincible Vacuum Cleaner, R. W. Foyle, 

Agent. San Francisco. 
"Excello" Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, F. W. 

Schaer Bros., Pacific Coast agents, Santa 

Maria Bldg., San Francisco. 
"Tuec" Air Cleaner, manufactured by United 

Electric Co., 110 Jessie St., San Francisco. 
B. & W. Stationary \^acuum Cleaner, sold by 

Arthur T. Riggs, 510 Claus Spreckels Bldg.. 

San Francisco. 
VALN'ES 
Jenkins Bros., 247 Mission St., San Francisco. 



\AL\E PACKING 

•■Palmetto Twist," sold by H. N. Cook Belting 

Co.. 317 Howard St., San Francisco. 
\'ARNISHES 

W. P. Fuller Co.. all principal Coast cities. 
Glidden Varnish Co.. Cleveland. O.. represented 

on the Pacific Coast by Whittier-Coburn Co., 

San Francisco, and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los 

Angeles. 
Standard Varnish Works. 113 Front St., San 

Francisco. 
S. F. Pioneer Varnish Works, 816 Mission St., 

San Francisco. 
MoUer & Schumann Co.. Hilo Varnishes, 1022-24 

Mission St., San Francisco. 
R. N. Nason & Co., San Francisco and Los An- 



VENETIAN BLINDS, AWNINGS, ETC. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
WALL BEDS 

Marshall & Stearns Co., 1154 Phelan Bldg., San 
Francisco. 
WALL BOARD 

Bishopric Wall Board sold by I. E. Thaver & 
Co.. San FraVcisco. and Central Door & 
Lumber Co., Portland, Oregon. 
WALL SAFES 

Lowrie Wall Safe, sold by C. Roman Co.. 173 
Jessie St.. San Francisco. 
WATER HEATERS 

Pittsburg Water Heater Co., 237 Powell St., San 
Francisco. 

Hoffman Heater Co., Sutter St., San Francisco. 

Radke Heaters, sold by Schaer Bros., 173 Jessie 
St., San Francisco. 
WATERPROOFING FOR CONCRETE, BRICK, 
ETC. 

"Impervite." sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (Sec 
adv. on page 26.) 

Concreto Cement Coating, manufactured by the 
Muralo Co. (See color insert for Coast dis- 
tributors.) 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Glidden's Concrete Floor Dressing and Liquid 
Cement Enamel, sold on Pacific Coast by 
Whittier, Coburn Company, San Francisco and 
Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los Angeles. 

Imperial Co., 183 Stevenson St., San Francisco. 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land. Tacoma and Spokane. 

The Building Material Co., Inc., 583 Monadnock 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co., Inc. (See Adv. for 
Coast agencies.) 
WHITE ENAMEL FINISH 

"Gold Seal." manufactured and sold by Bass- 
Hueter Paint Company. All principal Coast 
cities. 

"Satinette," Standard Varnish Works, 113 Front 
St.. San Francisco. 

Moller & Schumann Co., Hilo Varnishes, 1022 
Mission St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Sno-wite, manufactured by Trussed 
Concrete Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast dis- 
tributors. 
WINDOWS— REVERSIBLE, ETC. 

Perfection Reversible Window Co., 2025 Market 
St., San Francisco. 

WTiitney Adjustable Window Co., San Fran- 
cisco. (See page 29.) 

Hauser Reversible Window Co., Balboa Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
WINDOW SHADES 

Top Light Shade Co.. 737 Market St.. Oakland. 
WIRE FABRIC 

Wadsworth. Howland & Co.. Inc. (See Adv. on 
page 31 for Coast agencies.) 

U. S. Steel Products Co., Rialto Bldg., San 



Co., 140 T. 



d St., San Fran- 



L. A. Nc 

Cisco. 
WOOD MANTELS 

Fink & Schindler, 218 13th St., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fra; 

cisco. 



The Architect and Engineer \7 



Send right away for the New 
Loose-Leaf Handbook on 



Roofing, Building 

Paper and 

Waterproofing 

It ought to be in the files of 
every Architect and Engineer. 

The Par af fine Paint Co. 

34 First Street, San Francisco 

Telephone Kearny 2785 
SEATTLE PORTLAND SPOKANE 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



18 



The Architect and Engineer 



TILING 

MANTELS 

GRATES 




A. S. MANGRUM. Pres. & M gr. CHAS. C. HANLEY. Secv & Treas. 

MANGRUM & OTTER 

INCORPORATED 

FURNACE AND STEAM HEATING 

HOTEL AND KITCHEN OUTFITS 

Stoves, Ranges. Refrigerators. Tin and Enameled Ware 



Telephone Kearny 

3155 



561-563 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



AERO-GAS is 50 Per Cent CHEAPER Than City Gas 

Aero-Gas is Best for Cooking, Heating and Illuminating 
of country houses, factories, public buildings, schools, 
churches, etc. Made from ordinary Motor Gasoline — non- 
poisonous, non-odorous, non-explosive — can be used when 
city gas is not obtainable, or can be substituted for city gas 
without changing piping, ranges, heaters, or lighting fix- 
tures. Architects should investigate. Circulars free. 

THE UTILITY GAS GENERATOR CO. 

PHONES: DOUGLAS 2400 GARFIELD 7937 
340 SANSOME STREET -SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 





HAWS SANITARY 
Drinking: Fountains 

are used today in the best State. County and Municipal 
Buildings on the Pacific Coast. Also in Schools, Theaters, 
Lodge Rooms. Parks. Depots, etc. 

Do You Want the Best? Specify HAWS. 

Send for Catalogue 



j^ Haws Sanitary Drinking Faucet Co. 



1808 Harmon Street, BERKELEY, CAL. 

C. F. WEBER CO. 
San Francisco and Los Angeles 



GRAVITY SPIRAL CHUTE 

Economical Method of Lowering Boxes, Package Goods and Merchandise 

M.ADE BY 

MINNESOTA MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

Manufacturers of Spirals, Automatic Siraight-Lift Eleva 
tors, Gravity Freight Conveyors and Power Conveyors 
Engineers and Designers of Labor-Saving Conveying 
Systems. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 



602 MISSION STREET 



San Francisco 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 678 




please 




FLAT FINISH 



The Architect and Engineer 19 



On Mission Work 

That soft dull rubbed effect can 
now be secured with no expense for 
rubbing, and yet with a finish having 
all the good qualities of a rubbed 
varnish. 

Can be used over stain, shellac, gloss, or 
other varnishe-, and the finest woodwork. 

Its jelly-like nature, with nothing to sep- 
arate or settle out, insures a uniform finish 
on all work. 

It is free from wax. 

You will be interested in Hilo Flat Finish. Let 
us send further information and sample of work. 

Moller & Schumann Co., 1022-24 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



American IKeene Cement Co. 

Office, 2.57 Monadnock Building, SAN FRANCISCO 
Works, SIGUARD, UTAH 

Formerly Known as BICKEL'S KEENE CEMENT 




'Strongest Keene Cement Known" 



RECENT SAN FRANCISCO BUILDINGS: 
Flood Residence, Bliss & Faville, Architects 

Physicians' Building, Frederick H. Me>er, Architect 

Hotel Ramona, Smith & Stewart, Architects 

American Keene Cement Company 

of California 

Telephone Garfield 7331 257 Monadnock Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 

When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



20 



The Architect ami Engineer 













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When writing to \dverti: 



please mention this magazine. 



The Architect a'ld Emy'inccr 21 



SPECIFY 




Green Label Varnishes 

and 

Advanced Finishes 

for all modem Building Construction, and then rest assured that 
you have specified the best that modem Science can produce. 
Made by the largest vamish factory in the world, and with a 
reputation of over fifty years as the Standards, they may be de- 
pended upon to be 

ALWAYS UNIFORM IN QUALITY 

and that they are manufactured by the most modem facilities and 

BEST SUIT THE PURPOSES 

for which paint and vamish Science has chosen them. 

GET ACQUAINTED WITH 
GLIDDEN 

by mailing a postal to the Calif omia Distributors, when you shall 
receive a full set of handsomely finished samples of Glidden Green 
Label Vamishes and Cement and Concrete Finishes, etc. 

Whittier - Coburn Co. , Tibbetts - Oldfield Co. , 

301 Howard Street 908 So. Main Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



22 



The Architect and Eiv^inecr 



HARDWOOD FLOORS USED THROUGHOUT SAN 
FRANCISCO'S FINEST AND NEWEST CLUB ROOMS 




WEST END OF LOBBY, COMMERCIAL CLUB. SAN FRANCISCO 
W. H. RatclifF, Jr., Architect Frederick Whitton. Manager of Construction 

The New Home of the San Francisco Commercial Club, Top Floor of Merchants' Exchange Building 
has been pronounced one of the Most Beautiful on the Coast. HARDWOOD FLOORS were laid by 

HARDWOOD INTERIOR COMPANY 

554 Bryant Street SAN FRANCISCO 




GIANT MODEL "A" 

OAKLAND 

3rd and Jefferson Streets 

„, \ Oakland 1374 
Phones Lakeside 67 




HIS machine, known as our 
Model "A" medium or high 
vacuum, handles a great vol- 
ume of air on small H. P. 
Manufactured in Oakland. 
Winner of Gold Medal at State 
Fair, 1913, against all competitive vacuum 
cleaners. The Judges were members of the 
California State Engineering Department. 
This machine embodies the vacuum cleaner 
process and can be instantly converted into 
a powerful compressor. Estimates cheerfully 
furnished to architects, contractors and build- 
ers. Hundreds of our machines in operation. 




Suction Cleaner Company 



SAN FRANCISCO 
731-733 Folsom Street 

Phone Kearny 26S4 



When writing to .\dvertisers please mention this magaz 




bid. Seal 

WllitQ 

Enamel 

TkeEnameldeLuxQ 



^^sswa.-*' 



"" Nothing is prettier in the 
home than a Louis XV room 
with the woodwork finished 
in pure white enamel. 

And that leads to the question: "What enamel is best?" 



There is but one answer, for there is but one BEST. Gold Seal White Enamel made by 
Bass-Hueter is without a doubt the best enamel in America, and for many reasons : 

It is pure white and it stays pure white through years of wear. It does not turn yellow 
with age as many other enamels do. When used over Gold Seal Flat for the undercoats, 
we guarantee it will remain white. 

It is durable — will not mar or scratch, crack or check. Hit it with a hammer and you 
only dent the wood — the enamel holds its surface. 

It is beautiful, as it forms a perfect finish — does not show brush marks, neither has it 
an uneven surface when properly applied. 

Gold Seal White Enamel can be rubbed to a soft, delicate, egg-shell finish, as it should 
be in a Louis XV room, or it can have a high gloss which the enamel itself produces, 
where it is used in a bathroom. 

If you are planning a new home, take up the question with your architect. He knows 
the quality of this enamel. 

Should you wish to have your living room or parlor made over, consult your painter. 
He will tell you from experience that Gold Seal is the best enamel ever made. 




We sell other grades of white enamel but we 
^^ recommend Gold Seal if you want the very best 

BASS-HUm PAINT CO. 

816 Mission St. 1564 Market St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Portland Los Angeles Seattle 



^•x% 




24 



The Architect and E)igiiiecr 



ROYAL FLUSH VALVES 




are rapidly supplanting all other meth- 
ods of flushing water closets, urinals 
and slop sinks. 

Flushing same quantity of water 
each operation of handle, no waste — 
noiseless. Write for catalog. 

N. O. NELSON MFG. CO. 

steam and Plumbing Supplies 

San Francisco Warehouse and Office: 
978 Howard St., Tel Kearny 4970 

LOS .WGELES S.\N DIEGO 



C. ROMAN CO. 

SPECIALTY PAINT MANUfACTllR[RS 

173 JESSIE ST., 0pp. Builders Exchange 
WE .M.WUFACTURE 

TECHNOLA" 

A ZINC PAINT containing Cement 

CUB BRAND 

GILSONITE 

QUICK DRYING BLACK 

SHINGLE STAIN 

BARREL HEAD 

FLAT-GLOSS 

LACQUERS 
GRAPHITE 

PASTE, SEMI-PASTE. LIQUID 

RED LEAD PASTE 
NO-DAMP 

WATER PROOFING 

PASTE COLORS 

HOUSE PAINTS 

WASHABLE WALL 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SCHAER BROS. 

Factory Representatives 

Excello Vacuum Machines 
Eclipse Stoves and Ranges 
RadKe Hot Water Heaters 

We cordially invite you to visit our 
demonstrating room, 

173 JESSIE STREET 

(Ground Floor) 

Opp. Builders' Exchange, near Third Street 

Phone Kearny 4728 




F.W. FITZPATRICK 

(with his Associated Specialists 

in Steel-Framing, Heating, 

Sanitation, etc.) 

OES for the Architect who 
only occasionally requires 
such services what the 
high-salaried and perma- 
nent staffs of e.xperts do 
for the few really big 
offices in the countrs'. The fees are 
rnoderate, the Serv-ice is of the very 
highest order, thorough, most prompt 
and enthusiastic. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick's personal work is 
limited to plan-problems, fire-preven- 
tion, design and the artistic rendering, 
"working-up" of perspectives, etc. from 
designs made in collaboration with the 
Architects or entirely of their ovm 
conception. 

Write for further data, illustrations 
and rates. 



4200 Sixteenth Street, N. VV. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



When writing to Advertisers please menticn this magazine. 



The Architect and En^^biccr 25 



"PAINTS 

for Every Purpose" 



PIONEER WHITE LEAD 
FULLER VARNISHES 
WASHABLE WALL FINISH 
PIONEER SHINGLE STAIN 

Are Manufactured by 

W. P. FULLER & CO. 

San Francisco 

Oakland Portland 

Sacramento Seattle 

Stockton Tacoma 

Los Angeles Spokane 

Long Beach Boise 

Pasadena San Diego 

Factories at South San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Eiii^iiteer 



Think what an increased tensile strength of more than 
59^ will mean in a cement floor mortar! 



FEDERAL STEEL 
CEMENT HARDENER 

WILL DO IT. 

Think of a similar strengthening armor in a concrete high- 
way will mean! 

The action of this wonderful hardener in a mortar is as 
simple as it is positive. As it is a compomid with iron 
dust as a base, it rusts and the resulting expansion of each 
minute particle closes up the pores and solidifies the mass. 
Could you ask for anything more direct in results? Use it. 
Demand it. Get it. 

A Step Toward Permanence 

E. A. BULLIS & CO. 

Merchants National Bank Bldg., San Francisco 

Cement Finishing Products 

When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



'flu- .Ivihitcct iind liii^^nicc 



The ONLY Background that holds Exterior 
Plaster Permanently and Prevents Cracking 



BISHOPRIC 




This shows the construction of 
stucco or plaster board — Dove- 
tail Lath — damp proof mastic- 
fiber board. 



^%tK'S'^ 



Made by the Central Door & Lumber Co., Portland 

oTUCCO BOARD — a non-staining spruce 
lath rigidly attached to a fiber board with damp 
proof mastic, fl Shrinkage Eliminated. 

1. E. THAYER & CO. 

no Market Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

BISHOPRIC WALL BOARD ALSO IN STOCK 



Del Monte White Sand 

(Known also as Monterey and Lake Majellaj 

AND 

Fan Shell Beach Sand 

Combined with the WHITE CEMENTS to produce 
chaste WHITE PLASTER Interior and Exterior 
Finislies, and Plain and Ornamental ARTIFICIAL 
STONE effects. 

Sold by Leading Building Material Dealers from 
Los Angeles to Vancouver, B. C. If not scjld by 
your dealer, write to us for Samples and Prices. 

Pacific Improvement Co. 

Phone, Kearny 4013 406 Crocker Building, San Francisco 



28 



The Arcliitcct and Engineer 



ARCHITECTS ATTENTION!!! 




For your SANITARY PORCELAIN WARE specify the California product made by 
the WESTERN STATES PORCELAIN CO. at Richmond, Cal., of the highest grade 
clays by most experienced workmen and the latest improved machinery, competing in 
quality and prices with the best Eastern goods, thus guaranteeing quick delivery and 
service. Illustrated catalog mailed on request. 

WESTERN STATES PORCELAIN CO. 

HERBERT F. BROWN. President 

Manufacturers of 
PLUMBERS VITREOUS CHINAWARE 



RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



For Sound and Economical Concrete Specify 

NILES SAND GRAVEL AND ROCK CO.'S 

Sharp Clean Concrete Sand. We carry three sizes 
of Crushed and Screened Concrete Gravel 

Roofing Gravel 

704 Market St., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2944 



Main Office: 
MUTUAL BANK BUILDING 




HANCOCK GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
FACED WITH 60,000 

Red Stock Brick 

Supplied by the 

DIAMOND BRICK CO. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

We Sell 

ARTISTIC CLAY BRICK 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 
Sales Office Telephone 

BALBOA BUILDING Sutter 2987 

ncnliun this niKgaziuc. 



The Architect and Etig^inccr 



29 




Residence as executed by David 
J. Myers, Architect, one of many, 
showing beautiful and artistic 
effects made practical through 
specifying ^^'hitney ^^'indo\vs. 

THE WHITNEV 
WINDOW I 
WM. H. PRINGLE, Mgr. 

TELEPHONE GARFIELD 7956 
522 Sharon Building, San Francisco. 




Steiger 

Terra Cotta ±^ pottery 

Works 



Main Office: 729 Mills Building 

: DOUGLAS 3010 San Francisco. Cal. 



ENAMELED BRICK 

MAT AND TRANSPARENT GLAZE 



PACIFIC SEWER PIPE CO. 



825 EAST SEVENTH STREET 



LOS ANGELES 



Gladding.HcBean&Co. 

Manufacturers Clay Products 

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco 

Works. Lincoln.Cal 



30 The Architect and Engineer 




'"'■^^^-- - 



JANE K. SATHER TOWER AND PRINCIPAL BUILDINGS OF UNIVERSITY GROUP, 
BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



University Library Exposition Auditorium 

Chemistry Auditorium Security Building, San Francisco 

■p , TT 'n Berkeley National Bank, Berkeley 

Boait nan ^.^^^ National Bank of Berkeley 

Agricultural Hall l^^j Strauss Buildings 1 and 2 
Residence of Pres. B. I. Wheeler American and Italian Bank, San 
Jane K. Sather Tower Francisco 

Buildings designed by Mr. John Galen Howard 
TRIMMED WITH 

RUSSWIN HARDWARE 



Russell & Erwin Manufacturing Co., Div. 

American Hardware Corporation. Successor 

New Britain, Conn. 
Commercial Bldg., 833 Market St., San Francisco 

NEW YORK CHICAGO LONDON. ENG. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Eifjineer 



M 



I'll Protect Your 

Concrete or Stucco 

Home Against 

Dampness 

One c at -I BAY STATE BRICK and 
CEMENT COATING will waterproof all 
concrete and cement surfaces without 
destroying the distinctive texture of the 
Cement. It becomes a part of the material 
over which it is applied and aflfords lasting 
protection to the structure ; preventing 
discoloration of interior and exterior sur- 
faces caused by moisture corroding the 
metal Lathing. 

Send for Book 25 which contains complete 
information on the subject of waterproof- 
ing and decorating Concrete surfaces. 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND & CO., Inc. 




Paint and Var 
82-84 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



DISTRIBUTING .AGENTS: 

F. T. CROWE & CO Portland, Ore.; Sookane. Seattle. Tacoma, Wash.; Vancouver. B. C. 

JON'ES-MOORE P.AI.VT HOUSE ' San Diego. Cal. 

R. .N. .\'ASO.\" & CO 54 Pine Street. San Francisco and 1047 South Main Street. Los .A.ngeles. Cal. 



r-FOR MODERN REINFORCED CONCRETE^ 
DAYLIGHTED BUILDINGS 

We manufacture and can furnish all the required Materials except 
the cement, sand, stone and lumber. We will promptly furnish esti- 
mates on any construction for these products 



UNITED SASH 
UNITED CASEMENTS 
United Fire Windows 
UNITED DOORS 
KAHN BARS 
RIB BARS 
COLUMN HOOPING 
RIB METAL 
ARMOR PLATE 
CURB BARS 



TRUSSED 

CONCRETE 

STEEL 

CO. 

Home Office and Plant 

YOUXGSTOWN, OHIO 

San Francisco 

517 Sharon BIdg. Tel. -^utter 1067 

LOS A.N'GELES 
PORTLAND SEATTLE SPOKANE 



FLORETYLES 
FLOREDCMES 
HY-RIB 
RIB LATH 
DIAMOND MESH 
CHANNELS 
CORKER BFAP 
RIB STUDS 
SLOTTED INSERTS 
SPECIALTIES 



TRUS-CON CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 



writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 




"THE PICTURE TELLS THE STORY" 



TUEC 

The United Electric Co, 

CANTON, OHIO 

110 Jessie Street, San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Eiii^iiieer 



33 



BAR MADE ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 




SECTIONAL VIEW OF DOLBEAR CURB BAR IN CONCRETE 
SOLID ANCHORAGE — NOX-WEDGIXG — MECHANICALLY PERFECT 

THE AMERICAN STEEL BAR MFG. CO. 

MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BLDG. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
F. T. CROWE & CO. UNION LIME CO. 



Agents 
Seattle— 411 Qlobe BIdg. 
Tacoma — lOOS - A Street 
Spokane — So. 164 Madison St. 
Portland— 45 - 4th St. 



Agents Southern California 
Seventh & Alameda Sts., Los Angeles 

FRED H. FIGEL 

Agent 
San Jose. Calif. 



AMERICAN ART 
METAL WORKS 

Manufacturers of 

AMERICAN ART IN BRONZE 
AND IRON 

Church and Cemetery Bronze Work 
a Specially 

We Ma-.ufacture the follrding: 

Sculptured Bronze, Entrance Doors, 
Cast Bronze and Iron Stair Railings, 
Mausoleum Doors, Crematory Urns, 
Statues and Figures, Cast Bronze vSigns 
and Separate Letters, Memorial Tab- 
lets, Bronze Tablets with Portrait. 
Medallions, Sun-Dials, Fountains. Vas- 
es, Bronze and Iron Electric Light 
Standards, Cast Bronze and Iron 
Lanterns, Etc. 

13 GRACE STREET 

Bet. 9tb and lOtb, Mission and Howard Sts. 

MaAe?"i404 Sail Ftaiicisco 



The Judson Manu- 
facturing Company 

announces to the trade 
that il IS NOW 
OPERATING an 

Open -Hearth Furnace 

and is in a [position to fur- 
nish MILD STEEL BARS. 
SMALL ANCLES and 
UNIVERSAL P L A TES 

in the same range of 
sizes as it has hereto- 
fore supt^lied in double 
refined Iron. 

Judson Manupactiiring Co. 



rs please mention this magaz 



34 



The Architect and Engineer 




Wood. Down & Ueming. Arcliilects 



The Architect and Eii<rineey 



.^5 




UNIVERSITY LIBR.\RY. BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA. JOHN G. HOWARD. Architect 

This Building Equipped throughout with IVIott's Plumbing Fixtures 

Mott's manufacturing plant at Trenton, Xew Jersey, comprises Potteries, Iron 
and Brass Foundries, Enameling Works, Cabinet Shops, Ornamental Works, etc. 
In 1828 our works at ilott Haven were established. In 1894 our potteries were 
established in Trenton, where, in 1907, our entire manufacturing plant was 
concentrated. 

Not only do we manufacture all the goods we sell, but we manufacture them in 
one coml^rehensk-c plant, which is undoubtedly one of the most complete and 
thoroughly equipped of its kind. No expense has been spared to get the very best 
results of the highest quality in their various grades, and to do so at a reasonable 
cost. 

Our new showrooms at Xo. 135 Kearny street, San Francisco, exemplify the 
possibilities of modern plumbing of the highest class. In addition to the many 
individual fixtures exhibited, the two complete bathrooms demonstrate what can 
be accomplished by the proper treatment of tiling in conjunction with our imperial 
porcelain and otlier high-grade sanitar}- fixtures. Included are many neat and 
serviceable fixtures requiring but a minimum outlay. 

We strongly urge that, whenever possible, owners, architects and pluml>ers pay 
a visit to our showrooms, where our goods may be examined, their excellence 
demonstrated and selections made from the actual samples. Catalogues will be 
gladly furnished upon request. 

It is just as essential for those contemplating building or remodeling bathrooms 
to interest themselves in plumbing fixtures as it is to select rugs, furniture, portieres, 
etc. The bathroom of today is a primary feature in the "house beautiful" and. 
moreover, it contributes largely to health, comfort, and life-long satisfaction. 

Mott's plumbing fixtures are installed in representative buildings of all kinds 
throughout the country — residences, schools, hotels, hospitals, factories, prisons, etc. 



Motts 

Plumbing 

Fixtures 



THE J. L MOTT IRON WORKS 

1828— EIGHTY SEVEN YEARS OF SUPREMACY— 191 5 

Q LJ/^\ A/D/^/~\K ^Q 135 Kearny St., San Frincisco. 
OnW VV riL/ WIVIO Douglas 1786. D. H. Gulick. Siles Agt. 



tig to Advertisers please mentipn this magazine 



36 



The Architect and Eii<:;ineer 




What is More Troublesome than to Pack Radiator Valves? 



size packing. Because 
le stuffing box the pack- 
leak more or less when 



Vou never seem to have the rigl 
there is no active rod travel through 
ing sets and gets hard, and the valve 
opened or closed. 

PALMETTO TWIST 

can bu unstranded and any size valve packed from one spool. 

Itcannot burn — it's al! asbestos. Does not get hard — because 
a perfect lubricant is forced into each strand. 

Use PALMETTO TWIST on all the valves, and you will 
not liave to repack so often. 

We will send you a sample spool FREE. Just to prove tbis. 

H. N. COOK BELTING CO.. 

317-319 Howard St.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A. KNOWLES 

Metal Furring, Plastering and 
Decorations 

Phone Douglas 3451 
985 FOLSOM ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Specialist 

in 

"CAEN 

STONE" 




AUSTIN Improved Cube 
Concrete Mixer 

Made in all sizes and styles of mountings for 
general concrete work, for road and pavement 
construction, and for bituminous concrete work. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING & 
CONTRACTING CO. 

Main OBSce, Railnay E:ichangc, CHICAGO ILL. 

Direct Factory Branch in S.4X FR.iXCISCO. 

Temporary Office: 

A. M. SKILLM AN, 1235 PINE ST , San Francisco 



PACIFIC FIRE EXTINGUISHER CO. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Heating and Ventilating, Electrical In- 
stallations, Fire Extinguishing Apparatus 

THE GRINNELL AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 

Main Office, io? MONTGOMERY STREET. SAN FRAMCISCO. CAL. 

'-ii8 Colman Building .... - - - . Seattle Wash. 

Branch Offices: ^ |°f 505 McKay Building Portland Ore. 

826 Paulsen Building - - - - Spokane. W ash. 

563 I. W.Hellman Building Los .Angeles, Cal. 




mention this magaz 



The Architect and Eii' 



37 



Established 1902 



■OUALITY COVXTS" 




15,000 BOOTH ORNAMENTS 
To Architects and Booth Builders 

Save Time and Money p 

with \iest results. 

Ornamental Work, 

in Wood, Plaster, Compo, 
"Fibro" and Iron. 

15,000 Stock Models to choose from. 

Mouldings, Capitals. Brackets. Friezes. Coves. Panels. Shields. Urns. etc.. etc.. etc. 

Also Special Lighting Fixtures — Standards ^"''^^0° ?t°^'^^ 

QUICK DELIVERY, whether to order or from stock. 
Exclusive Agents — Decorators Supply Co., Chicago. 

N. Y. Car\'ed Moulding Co. and others 

WESTERN ByilDERS' SUPPLY CO. 

San Francisco, Gal. 

155 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 





Phone Kearny 1991 




BUILD of 
Concrete Slabs 

A FIREPROOF BUILDING 
OF REINFORCED CON- 
CRETE FOR THE SAME 
MONEY AS A COMBUSTI- 
BLE STRUCTURE OF WOOD 

Walls and Partitions of 
Concrete Slabs== 
Waterproof, Crackproof, 
Everlasting==Sanitary 

■"^ Note the Air Space 

INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Parker & Ninth Sis. West Berkeley, Cal. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



38 



The Architect and Engineer 




Beautiful 
Hand 
Wrought 
Art WorK 

IN 

COPPER 

AND 

BRONZE 



Bust of George i. o.'.lini^. uii 

San Francisco Metal Stamping 
and Corrugfating Company 



VULCAN 

Refrigerating: 
and Ice Making 
Machines 




Refrigerate Cold Storage Rooms 
Make Pure Distilled Water ice 
Supplj Cooled Drinking Water 



Etc., Etc. 



Manufactured by 



VULCAN IRON WORKS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



The Cutler Mail Chute 




Pacific 
Coast 
Represen- 
tatives : 

San Francisco, 
Cal., 

Thomas Day 
Company. 

Portland, 
Ore. 

C. W. Boost. 

Seattle and 

Tacoma, 

Wash., 

D. E. Fryer 
&Co. 

Spokane, 
Wash. 



Mall Box— L. C. Sn 
Se»tt 
Gaserln * fin 



Cutler Mail Chute Co., 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Cutler Building. 




01iNAA\ENTAL 

IR0N6BR0NZE 

STRVCTVEAL STEEL 

CINCINNATI 

i\N FRANCISCO 

WESTERN BVTLMKS SVPFEy CO 

155 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 
LOS ANCEIES 

SWEETSEE & BALDWIN SAFE CO 
200 EAST 9T2 ST 



When writing to Advertisers please 



The Architect and Engineer 



39 




Isometric view 
of the Oscil- 
lating Portal 
Wa 11 B ed 

showing how 
the same bed 
may be used, 
at will, either 
on the sleeping 
porch or in the 
room. 



Sleeping Porc 



MAP«:WAI T ^^^STFARTV? rn SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 

MAKMlAL,L.&&ll^AKI>iai^U., 11S2 Phelan Buildlni; 1774 Broadway 



Geo. H. Dyer President 



R. W. Dyer, VicePn 



\V. J, Dyer. Sec'y 



DYER BROTHERS 

Golden West Iron Works, Inc. 

Structural Iron and Steel Contractors 



ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 



Office and works: 
17th and KANSAS STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone Market 134 



Guaranteed Building Specialties 

SEE OUR LIST 



Enameled Brick (American Enameled Brick 

& Tile Co.) 
Safety Treads (.American Mason Safety Tread 

Co. 

Hollow Metal Steel and Bronze Doors 

and Trim (Monarch Metal Mfg. Co.) 

Revolving Door (.vtchison.) 

Medicine Cabinets (Corey Metal Mfg. Co.) 

Metal Lockers (Hart & Cooley Co.) 

Warehouse Doors, Rolling Steel Shut- 
ters, Oarage and Elevator Doors 

(Variety Manufacturing Co.) 



Dumb Waiters (Energy Elevator Co.) 
Radiator Valves (Lavigne Manufacturing Co.) 

Elevating Window Fixtures (Tabor Sash 

Fixture Co.) 

Metal Weather Strip, Bronze and Zinc 

(Monarch Metal Weather Strip Co.) 

Waterproofing Compound and Steel 
Cement Hardener Clnsulite." "Aqua- 
bar" and "National.") 

Venetian Blinds (Swedish Venetian Blind 
Co.) 



C. JORGENSEN & COMPANY ''' f/'.Villc^Jcl^^'' 



Telephone Kearny 2386 



40 



The Architect and Engineer 




The 
Real 



Only 
Stains 



Residence of Thomas Shields Clarke. Esq., Lenox. Stained 
wilh Cabot's Shingle Stains and linedwUh Cabot's Sheathing 
Quilt for warmth. Wihon Eyre. Architect. Philadelphia. 



If you have only seen the crude 
and tawdry colors of the thinned- 
paint imitations of 

Cabot's 
Shingle Stains 

you have no idea of the beautiful 
coloring effects of the true Stains. 
They are soft and deep, like vel- 
vet, but transparent, bringing 
out the beauty of the wood grain. 
Half as expensive as paint, twice 
as handsome, and the only Stains 
made of Creosote, "the best wood 
preservative known." 



/^ AUr'^nP'C "/^TTTT TT" Cold-Proof, Heat-Proof, Sound-Proof 
V>ix\.r>W 1 iJ I^UIIjI 40 Times Warmer than Common Papers 

The many imitations of Cabot's Quilt are the best evidence of its wonderful effi- 
ciency and success. Quilt is sold on quality — the imitations are made to sell cheap! 
Quilt is rot-proof, vermin-proof and almost fire-proof. It is the only deadener that 
breaks up and absorbs sound-waves. 

SAMUEL CABOT, Inc., Mfg. Chemists, Boston, Mass. 

Cabot's Waterproof Cement Stains. Waterproof Brick Stains. Conservo Wood Preservative. 
Damp-proofing, Waterproofing, Protective Paint, etc. 
( Pacific Building Materials Company, San Francisco. 
AGENTS \ The Mathews Paint Company, Los Angeles. (Stain). 
^ Waterhouse & Price Company, Los Angeles. (Quilt). 



J. G. BRAUIN 

615-621 S. Paulina St., Chicago, 111. 

527-541 W. 35TH ST.. NEW YORK 



Steel Mouldings for Store Fronts 



Elevator Enclosures, Etc. 





Plain and Oraamenlal Sash Bars, Leaves, Rosettes 

Pickets and Oraamenlal Rivets, Square Root 

AoilelroD from ^8"x^8"xl-l6" Upwards 

Square Tubing for Elevators. Elevator 
Enclosures and Office Railings 

PATENT SHEET METAL SHEARS PUNCHING MACHINES 

All parts, including the main body, are made of forged steel, which makes theae 
tools far superior to any made from cast steel. <]f The Punch Machines are made 
from steel plates. All movable parts are steel forginga. All parts which can be 
are tempered. The Eccentric pillar blocks are made with Independent steel rings. 
Some of these Machines also have Shears for cutting Angle, Tee or Flat Iron. 

WRIU fOR CAIALOG 
AND PRICES 




OVER 900 
MACHINES 
SOLD 



When writing to Adv 



The Architect and Engineer 



41 



P. Noble. Pres. 



Edward Bonneau Noble. Vice-Pres, 



Thomas Rolph Sec'y 



f ariftr Snlling Mill (En. 



SUPPLIERS OF 



Structural Steel, Forgings, Bolts, Rivets, 
Frogs, Switches, Cast Iron Castings 



General Office nnd Works 

17th and MISSISSIPPI STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Market 215. also Connecting City Offices 



City Offices 

216-217 SHARON BUILDING 

Telephone Sutter 4388 




.ii''''li^\^ 



('^1 



TELEPHONE 

Home Phone m 1841 
A, A. DEVOTO. President 






ND woBKs: 621-651 FLORIDA ST. 
Habhison and Bryant, isth and is 
San Francisco. Calif. 




W. B. MORRIS, President H. M. WRIGHT, Vice-President L. J. GATES. Secretary 

Western Irom Works 

STRUCTURAL IRON and 
STEEL CONTRACTORS 



Gas Holders, Vault Linings, Jails, Fire Escapes, Beams, Channels, Angles 
and Steel Wheelbarrows Carried in Stock 



Phones; Keamy 575 
J 1259 



n:\il %\\\fs^slV SAN fRANCISCO, CAL. 



W. R. ERODE, Pres. R. J. ERODE, Viee-Pres. LOUIS R. HOLAl. Sec'ty 

ERODE IRON WORKS 

EstablisheJ 1S86 Incorporated 1013 

Fabricators and Contractors of Structural Steel 

and 

ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 

Telephone Kearny 2464 
31 to 37 HAWTHORNE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

Between Howard and Folsom Sts., East of Third Street 

When writing lo .Advertisers [lease menlion Hii.=, magazine. 



42 The Architect and Engineer 



TELEPHONE. MISSION 1763 HOME PHONE. J 2376 

C. J. HILLARD CO., Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Bank and Office Railings. Elevator Enclosures and Cars. 

Cast Iron Stairs and Store Fronts. Wire Work. Fire Escapes. 

Nineteenth and Minnesota Sts. c c- r- \ 

N.xt to California Cann-ri« ^^aH h rancisco, Lai. 



Telephone Mission 5230 

Ralston Iron Works, Inc. 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
Ornamental Iron Worfi 

Twentieth and Indiana Sts. San Francisco, Cat. 



Phone Main 322 

The Palm Iron and Bridge Works 

INCORPORATED 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
ORNAMENTAL IRONWORK 

15th and R Streets - SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



MERRIT IRONING BOARD 

THE attention of architects and owoiers is called to the 
exceptional merits of the Merrit Ironing Board, the 
latest improvement in folding ironing boards. This 
ironing board has given genuine satisfaction wherever 
it has been installed. It is very rigid, strong and simple. 
Send for Descriptive Circular and Price List to 

MERRIT IRONING BOARD COMPANY 

1715 21 MISSION STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO 



When writing to .'^idvc 



The Architect and Ens.inccr 



4,^ 




SPECIFY THE COLONIAL 
HEAD THROATand DAMPER 

THE BEST DEVICE FOR OPEN FIREPLACES 
SEE SWEETS INDEX PAGES— 1702-3 

SOLD ON THE PACIFIC COAST BY 

^"^^Tt««.f°- "'««'"^^'^''i':°,l±?.l" COLONIAL 



D. O. Church 
Scott. Lyman & Stack 
D E. Frver&Co. 
Wm. N. ONeil & Co 
M. J. Walsh Co. 



Sin Fr„.....o^u 

Sacramento F I R E P L AC E 

ncouver^B^C COMPANY 

Po°r"tL"d. Ore. :: CHICAGO:: 



CRANE 

COMPANY 


Higli Grade . . . 

PLUMBING 
SUPPLIES 

Steam and Hot Water Heating 

PIPE, VALVES. FITTINGS 


Second & Brannan Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO 


Power Plant and Water Works Materials 

STEAM SPECIALTIES 



CALIfORNIA STEAM AND PLUMBING SyPPLY CO. 

PIPE, VALVES AND FITTINGS o^piCB and warehouse: 

FOR 671-679 FIFTH STREET 

STEAM, GAS, WATER AND OIL 



COMPLETE STOCK OR 

The Kelly & Jones Company Products 

WRITE ROR CATAUOGUE 



Corner Bluxome 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Sutler 737 



CRUDE OIL BURNING EQUIPMENT 

write us yi>ur requirements. We will specify antl submit bijs on 

High or Low Pressure Mechanical Burners 

Installed on 30 days Trial — Price Lowest 

AMERICAN HEAT & POWER COMPANY 

7th and Cedar Streets OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

When writing to .\dvertisers please mention ;his magazine. 



44 



T!ic Architect and Ens_inecr 



Ever Have Trouble With Your 
Furnace or Retort? 

The fault is not always with 
the IVorl^manship, sometimes it's 
the material. 

Specify "Livermore" when 
you use Fire Brick or Fire 
Clay Products of any J^ind and 
})ou can depend upon the quality 
being there. Special shapes and 
sizes made to order. Standard 
sizes carried in stock.. 

LIVERMORE FIRE BRICK CO. 



LIVERMORE, 



CALIFORNIA 




STEEL TANKS COATED 



BITURINE 

CANNOT RUST (inside and out) 

White House — O'Connor & Moffatt — Eastman Kodak 

Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson — Commercial — Flood Bldgs. 

TANKS ALL COATED. 

24 California St., San Francisco Kearny 4478 




THE KINNEAR MFG. CO. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

STEEL ROLLING FIREPROOF 

DOORS AND SHUTTERS 

Agents 
Seattle = Portland = Los Angeles = Salt Lake City 

San Francisco Office 517 Rialto Building 



66 



FIRE — A CRIME" 



W'e are equipped with two Pacific Coast Factories to manufacture 
METAL DOORS — Tin Kalamein, Composite. Hollow Steel and Bronze, — Swinging, 

Sliding, Folding. Elevator. Van Kannel Revolving Doors, and Wilson's Steel 

Rolling Doors. 
METAL WINDOWS — Underwriters, Hollow Metal of all kinds, Kalamein, Bronze 

and Steel Sash gm- See the SIMPLEX METAL WINDOW. 



UNITED STATES METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
525 Market St., San Francisco 750 Keller St., Los Angeles 



Agents and Branches in all Coast Citii 



The Architect and Engineer 

of California sin^ii- copl-s, 

25 Cents 

Pacific Coast States 



of subscripiion. of Califomia 

■W.oO per \ear 



Contents for January 



P.\GE 

SATHEE TOWER, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY 

Frontispiece 

John Galen Howard, Architect 

SOME OF THE RECENT WORKS OF JOHN GALEN HOWARD, 

F. A. I. A. IT 

W. C. Hays, A. I. A. 

WHY BE AN ARCHITECT? 83 

Carl F. Gould, A. I. A. 

THE ARCHITECT AND THE CLIENT S.", 

Oliver La Farge 

A PLEA FOR THE PRESERVATION OF THE PRESENT ARCHI- 
TECTURAL BEAUTY OF THE FERRY BUILDING - - - ST 

THE HUMAN SIDE OF THE ARCHITECT 88 

James Stephen 
A NEW TYPE OF ARTIFICIAL SWIMMING POOL - - . . fio 

Prof. W. S. Franklin, Lehigh University 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ADMISSION OF ARCHITECTS TO 

PRACTICE .------.-.. 9.5 

THE ANTIQUITY OF BRICK 101 

THE HIGH COST OF INCOMPETENCE lO.i 

F. W. Fitzpatrick and S. Knise 

EDITORIAL • 112 

WITH THE ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS 114 

BOOK REVIEWS 119 

HEATING AND LIGHTING - - 121 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING - - - 12(i 

In.le.x 10 .AtWertisements Page 81 




Frontispiece 
The Architect and Engii 
of California 
January, 1915 



THE J.4.\'E K. SATHER TOWER 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

JOHN GALEN HOWARD. ARCHITECT 



THE 

Architect and Engineer 

Of California 

Pacific Coast States 

Vol. XL. Cv«-^^"" JANUARY, 1915 No. 1. 

,.:v250 

Some Architectural Works of John Galen Howard 

By WILLIAM C. HAYS. A. I. A. 

IF it be true that music, poetry, painting, 
sculpture and architecture are but phases, 
all, of the very selfs seeking utterance, 
then one finds here and there, even among 
moderns, the artist favored with power of ex- 
pression through varied mediums. Such a 
man is he of whose buildings this sketch is 
written ; so versatile that there is need to 
delimit the title chosen for any comment upon 
his works. Not only is he a busy prac- 
titioner ; he is teacher and consulting expert 
as well. In quite another field, he has written 
essays and papers on both general and tech- 
nical subjects which are a generous contribu- 
tion to the world store. He is also a prolific 
author in belles lettres and it was Cass Gilbert 
who, speaking to the writer, said of Mr. Howard's most sustained work in 
verse, "This is a searching translation of the artist's attitude toward his work 
and the world." The poem "Brunelleschi" is not. as referred to by its author, 
merely "this imagined face," but is, rather, a stark innermost type-portrayal of 
ihe creative artist. 

Without energy, enthusiasm, buoyancy and the labor that is love rather than 
of love, there cannot well be either inclination or capacity for so diverse work: 
these traits are his. .-Vn untiring, time-regardless worker, yet never hurried, 
never showing trace of the toil : many is the draftsman who has, day after day, 
and sometimes reluctantly, forfeited much of the lunch hour while his chief 
has studied and restudied with him the big conception or the minutest detail. 

It is his executed buildings, however, with which we have to deal. The 
appointment to carry out the University Group was the magnet which drew 
Mr. Howard west. It will be rememibered that in the Phoebe A. Hearst Archi- 
tectural Competition for the University of California the first prize was won 
by Monsieur Emil Ilenard, of Paris. After the competition M. Benard was 
commissioned to make certain further studies of the general plan, but no ar- 
rangement was culminated for his coming from France to carry out any of the 
scheme. On the completion of M. Benard's restudies the Regents of the Uni- 
versity looked about for the properly qualified man to bring the buildings into 
reality and secured Mr. Howard, who had been one of the prize winners, to 
come and establish practice here. This he did. in the spring of 1902, main- 
taining an ofiice in Xew York, however where a number of works were under 
way, until his final withdrawal in 1904. 




48 



The Architect and Engineer 




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THEPHOl ■ /VXi.'.V HEARST /LAX 

UNIVERSITY OF C A L I F O R \ I A 
JOH\ CALEX HOWARD. SUPERVISIXG ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Eiii>iiiccy 



49 




50 



The Architect and Emiincer 




The Architect and Eii''iiiccr 



51 




CATALOGUE ROOM OF LXiyERSITY LIBRARY. UXIVERSITY OF CALIFORMA 
John Galen Hauard, Architect 




READISG ROOM OF USIVERSITY LIBRARY. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORMA 
John Galen Howard, Architect 



52 



The Architect and Eiis'iiiccr 




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The Architect and Enzinecr 










54 



The Architect and Engineer 




INTERIOR COURT, HEARST MEMORIAL MINING 
BUILDING, UNIfERSITV OF CALIFORNIA 



The Architect and Engineer 



55 



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HEARST MEMORIAL MIXIXG BUILDING. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
i'iew from Sather Tower 




BOALT HALL OF LAW, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



56 



The Architect and Engineer 




READING ROOM. BOALT HALL OF LAW 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
JOHN GALEN HOWARD. ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Engineer 



57 





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7H£ GREEK THEATRE, UNIVERSITY OF C ALIFORM. 4 
Perspective and Plan of Completed Building John Galen Howard. Architect 



58 



The Architect and Engineer 







33 






The Architect and Ennnca 



59 




MITCHELL MONUMENT. UNIVERSITY OF C.4i.IF0RN!A 
JOHN GALEN HOWARD, ARCHITECT 



60 



The Architect and E7i!finccr 




TEVIS MEMORIAL. CYPRESS LAIVM CEMETERY 
John Gcleti Howard, Architect 




LOGGIA A\D GARDEX, MAIN ENTRAXCE TO ST. FRAXCIS 11 OOD 
John Galen Howard, .'Architect 



The Architect and Etv^inccr 



61 




ADAM GRAXr BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
JOHN GALEN HOWARD, ARCHITECT 



62 



The Architect and Engineer 




2^ 



The Architect and n.n;^inccr 



63 







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64 



The Archilcct and Etiginccr 







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The Arcliilcct and Eui'iiu'c' 



65 




COSTIXESTAL BilLDIXC. SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 

Jolni Galen HoicarJ. Archhccl 




SALES ROOM IX PI LKCf.^A RKOir BLILi'LyO. SA\ Fft.^.\ C7 ^t ( >. C.Ujri>l;\LA 
John Galen Howard, Architect 



66 



The Architect and Engineer 




Golden Gate Cement BERKELEY NATIO.VJL BANK BUILDIWG. BERKELEY. CALIFORSUA 

used JOHN GALEN HOWARD, ARCHITECT 



The Arcliitcct and Etv^inccr 



67 




EUCLID APARTMENTS, BERKELEY. CALIFORNL't 
John. Galen Ho-a'arJ. Architect 



In the placing- of the first building- on its plot, according to the revised 
Benard plan, difficulties of grading developed new and unforeseen problems 
and it became evident that some way would have to be devised by which the 
natural contours could be kept more nearly undisturbed. Since the original 
competition, as well as the subsequent studies, had all been along the line of 
purely formal architecture, it will be seen that radical departures were needed 
and that the project had to be studied "de nouveau." (3ne other reason for 
change has been a response to the fact that any university is a living, nioving 
and growing organism: that its developnient is impossible-of foretelling and 
that expansions of departments here, shrinkages tlijcre, constantly dictate 
modifications as long as the plan remains in a plastic state. 

Mr. Howard's first task for the University was the Hearst Memorial Min- 
ing Building, for which the sketches and earlier drawings had been made in 
New York. In more or less steady succession there have come into being, of 
the permanent buildings the Greek Theatre, the Power Plant, California Hall, 
the University Library, Boalt Hall of Law, the Sather Gate, Agriculture Hall 
and the Jane K. Sather Tower — which is now nearing conipletion. Besides these 
permanent buildings there have been erected sonie dozen or more "temporary" 
buildings to house in some make-shift fashion the rapidly growing classes of 
many of the departments. Of the Library, largest of the University Group, 
it is worth mention that the main reading room — exceeding in size all others in 
America except that of the Xew York Public Library — is often so over-crowded 
with readers that plans for the Library extensions must provide for adtlitional 
reading space, opening from the already vast main room. 



68 



Tlic Architect and Euciuccr 




STAIR HALL I\ MR. HOHARDS RESIDESCE 
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 



The Architect and Engineer 



60 




COURT OF MR. HOWARD'S RESIDENCE 
BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA 



70 



The Architect and Engineer 

lliiBrilMTTr"" 




.1/7?, HOirARD'S STUDY 



In general practice, Mr. Howard has ranged broadly and has carried out 
monumental, commercial, domestic and garden work ; he has also been en- 
trusted with large undertakings in association with others. 

His monumental work is doubtless best shown by the beautiful memorial of 
the Tevis family in Cypress Lawn Cemetery, San Francisco. The design is 
composed of a large, somewhat elevated cirailar niche flanked bv exedrae. 
All of the lines, both in plan and elevation, are subtle curves of great beauty, 
execution of which was the despair of the workmen. For this memorial Herbert 
Adams executed three sculptured figures, the central of which, a bronze, is the 
Angel of the Resurrection, and poises lightly, hands outstretched, above the 
burial plot. Following the top outlines of the exedrae is a beautifully lettered 
scriptural text. A word in passing is to be said, also, of the simple but satis- 
fying monumental drinking fountain which was erected in Berkeley by the class 
of 1907 as memorial to John Mitchell, who was annorer to the student cadets 
of the University. 

Of a semi-monumental character are the gates and entrances to several land 
subdivisions in Alameda County, such as those at Clarement. Claremont Court, 
and Xorthbrae : and more particularly the comprehensive scheme of entrances, 
fountains, shelters and minor architectural accessories at St. Francis' Wood in 
San Francisco. Much is to be said for the restraint and proprietv of the 
architecture of this work at St. Francis" Wood. In its form and detail it seem.s 
peculiarly suitable for execution in plaster, for its placing in the broad outdoors 
against a background of eucalvptus trees and to be, itself in turn, the foil for 
great floral masses of vivid color. 



The Architect and Engineer 



71 




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72 



The Architect and Engineer 




COURT AXD LIVISG ROOM, RESIDENCE OF DUKCAS' McDVFFlE. ESQ.. 

Berkeley. California 

John Galen Houard. Architect 



The Architect and Eui^inccr 



7i 




RESIDENCE OF DUNCAN MrDUFFIE. ESQ.. BERKELEY. CAUF0RNI.4 
John Galen Howard, Architect 




ENTRANCE GATES AND GARAGE OF DUNCAN McDUFFIE. ESQ.. BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 
John Galen Howard, Architect 



74 



The Architect and Eng,biccr 




BARS AXD PUMP HOUSE OF DVXCAX McDCFFIE. ESQ., BERKELEY, CALIFORXIA 

Join, Galcii Hoz,-orJ. Architect 




RESIDEXCE OF IIARREX GREGORY. ESQ.. BERKELEY. CALIFORXLi 
John Galen Howard. Architect 



The Architect and Engineer 





76 



The Architect and Engineer 




PLAN OF THE SAN FRANCISCO CIVIC CE\TER 
( JOHN GALEN HOWARD 

Board of^p'ublk''fforl;s 1 FREDERICK H. MEYER 
( JOHN REID, JR. 



Till Architect and En<:inccr 



77 




AEROPLANE VIEW OF SAM FRAXC/SCO CiriC CEXTER 
^ , . ^ , . ) JOH.W GALEN HOWARD 

Consulttng Architects I ironnEoi^i.- zj iriri/co 

Board of Public Works f FREDERICK H. MEYER 

) JOHN REID. JR. 



78 



The Architect and Eu[:incci 




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The .Ircliitcct and Eiv^inccr 



79 




MAIX ESTRANGE. EMERSOX SCHOOL. OAKLAXD. CALIFORSIA 
JOHN }. DOXOVAX, SUPERVISIXG ARCHITECT 

JOHX GALEX HOHARD. ASSOCIATE ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Engineer 




PATIO I\ EMERSO\ SCHOOL, OAKLAXD, CALIFORSIA 
John J. Dono-jan, Super-u-ising Architect 
John Gaien Ho-j:ard, Associate Architect 



Several of the business buildings illustrated date from the period following 
the great San Francisco fire after Mr. Howard had formed a partnership with 
John D. Galloway, under the firm name of Howard & Galloway. Architects and 
Engineers. Arthur H. ^Nlarkwart and the writer being junior members of the 
firm. Some of the works of this firm were the Italian-American Bank, the 
Security and Adam Grant Buildings in San Francisco, the Berkeley National 
Bank and the Bank of Santa Rosa. Among the buildings carried out by Mr. 
Howard in his separate practice the Empress Theatre, the Third Street Annex 
of the Spreckels Building, and the Pierce-Arrow Building are all recent : the 
First National Bank and Carnegie Library, both of Berkeley, date from before 
the fire. 

One of the most interesting of his works is the new Emerson School in 
Oakland, done in collaboration with J. J- Donovan. This plan is one of double 
courtyards separated by an auditorium, and surrounded on their other sides by 
class and administration rooms/ It is a plastered exterior with brick trimmings 
and Spanish tile roof. There^is associated with a wrought iron railing for the 
kindergarten of this school an amusing story of its design. !Mr. Howard being 
asked by an assistant what character should be given to the iron work, answered, 
"Oh, make it as simple as A. B. CI" He was taken at his word and the panels 
of the railing are instructively composed of the alphabet and arable numerals. 

Among the most successful of Mr. Howard's domestic buildings mention 
may be made of the Euclid Apartments at the corner of Hearst and Euclid 
avenues, Berkelev. Here enough color has been used in the cornice to make 



The Architect and E)igiiieer 81 

one wish there had been more, and to bring up the query of why we have all 
seemed to hesitate at the use of strong color in buildings until Jules Guerin 
came to devise the color scheme for the Exposition. Some other houses erected 
in Berkeley by Mr. Howard are a group of three, crowning one of the lower 
hills. The first was the one he planned for himself * and which was designed 
fronx day to day on the job. The only drawing made was a plan of the lot and 
the foundation ; after this the owner, on each morning's visit, laid out enough 
work to keep the carpenters busy for the day. Workmen, who at first found 
themselves at sea without drawings, soon caught the spirit and became inter- 
ested and eager to see what would follow. The Sprague and Miller houses 
complete this individualized but harmonious group. The several buildings of 
the Duncan McDuffie place also should be mentioned among his domestic 
works. 

Mr. Howard's association with others has been extensive. That nearest 
us, in p>oint of time and place, is the service rendered by him to the city of San 
Francisco as a meniiber, together with Frederick H. Meyer and John Reid, Jr., 
of the Board of Consulting Architects. Schools, firehouses and similar works 
have been carried out by them, jointly, but the monument equally shared by 
the Administration, the Architectural Board and a farseeing citizenship will 
be the design and achievement of a Civic Center and Municipal .\uditorium. 
second to none in the land. The Board also acts in an advisory way with the 
architects of the other Civic Center buildings. 

Mr. Howard, before coming to California, was a leading member of the 
Board of Architects of the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, where he 
designed and built the dominant feature of the composition — the Electric 
Tower. He again found himself a guiding spirit in exiX)sition design, in 1906, 
when the firm of Howard & Galloway were architects in chief of the Alaska- 
Yukon Pacific Exposition. In that instance the earlier general planning was 
done in collaboration with Olmsted Brothers. Later, the preparation of archi- 
tectural plans, the facade sketches, all construction of the main exposition 
palaces, and the general supervision of all State and secondary building de- 
signs were entrusted to Mr. Howard's firm. In the development of the facades 
of the major buildings local architects were associated. At Seattle there were 
also three buildings, all the work of Howard & Galloway, which were destined 
for pennanent use by the University of Washington after the close of the Fair. 
These are now the Auditorium. Chemistry Building (during the E.xposition 
period the Art Gallery), and the Engineering Building. 

It i's the maturity of his creative power that Mr. Howard has brought and 
given to California his home by adoption. New York and thereabout is rich in 
his earlier works. Almost without exception they were brilliant, swift-flashing 
inspirations of the enthusiast returned from Paris fresh from a three years' 
quickening contact with Victor Laloux. Already Richardson had taught vigor, 
and McKim thoroughness, devotion, and fine feeling; so his designs were ex- 
pressions of vivid personality, of vital young manhood, of a will to do the high 
and worthy thing. It was in the time of the competitions for the New York 
Library, the Yacht Club, and of the just completed Hotel Renaissance that 
the writer, then a student, came to wonder at the power which the high 
Gods had put into the hands of this young architect, whose name, in- 
dexed often in the magazines, meant expectation and fulfillment. Long 
before he was to me more than a name, the photogravure plate of his ex- 
quisite facade for the New York Yacht Club, representing him. hung just over 
my drawing table ; in the years since then I have come to know something of 
the man. Instead of that voiceless yet speaking facade, studied in college davs, 



82 The Architect and Engineer 

there has been the closer touch in practice and teaching — and on my own part, 
the unformulated relation of subconscious pupil. 

I would say that the distinctive quality of his later architecture is its catho- 
licity. The fault of his earlier works, if fault they had, ( though it was the trend 
of tlie time, rather than the bent of the man ) was that they sometimes found 
their expression through a too strongly nationalized French type of architect- 
ure; these newer things are not French — not Italian, nor Spanish, nor English 
— nor even American ; have they not a quality of universality that is abreast of 
our age? Perhaps here is added evidence that national demarcations are being 
wiped out in modern architecture, as they most surely have been in the sciences 
and, to a large extent, in the other arts. 

It is unfair to summarize Mr. Howard's contribution with only this — the 
visible — result of his service. If these buildings might have been successfully 
done by other equally trained men, there remains one creation peculiarly his ; 
namely, the School of Architecture of the University of California. 

Twelve years ago when he came to the Pacific Coast, there were here no 
facilities for comprehensive architectural education. A few disjointed courses 
in the University' gave related subjects, but the basic study, design, was lacking. 
From the outset, the architectural course had to be built up ; it began with a 
faculty of one and a student body of eleven. It has grow-n to a faculty 
of seven ; it registers about two hundred and fifty students in at least 
one course in architecture and of these, eighty-two are registered in the major 
course in design. What means much for the raising of architectural standards 
on the Coast is that a growing and loyal alumni body is now behind the school, 
creditably showing by their performances that the work is worth while. Several 
alumni are teaching, one of whom heads the Architectural Department of a 
large State university. The school's work is partlv paralleled bv excellent 
ateliers of the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects, these two educational forces 
being helpful to one another. 

It is not a measurable quantity, this leavening influence of architectural 
education in a community. Certainly it reaches beyond the actual student body. 
Lectures, primarily intended for the students, receive visitors : exhibitions are 
arranged, publicly announced and largely attended. These exhibitions are 
not only of students' work, but they are varied to include such diverse things 
as etchings, lithographs, posters, Japanese prints and oriental rugs. 

It is to this phase of Mr. Howard's work, the organization of the school, 
that a group of the younger architects are most indebted. He has made 
technical training possible here. He has helped broaden the outlook and open 
up new opportunities : and, when such a new field is opened one realizes that 
there have been pioneers coming to California even decades after the days of 
forty-nine. 






^- 




MR. HOIfARDS SIG.WATURE 



The Architect and Engineer 83 

Why Be An Architect* 

By CARL F. GOL'LD 

WE wonder sometimes after we have had one of our unsatisfactory ad- 
ventures with a client whose thick hide we have been unable to 
puncture, whither have flown our early aspirations, our youthful 
high-mindedness, our desire to better the architectural world. We uncon- 
sciousl}' ask ourselves at such moments, whether the materializing of our 
dreams does in any way correspond to the dreams themselves ; whether we 
have not been led by "will-o'-the-wisp" and have been following something 
that leads nowhere? 

In the days of our early training we had been brought in contact with 
the great architectural periods of the past : we were led into the cool atmos- 
phere of the Eg}'ptian and Grecian life and art: we were transferred to the 
great empire of Rome, and led around its forum, in its palaces, and we thor- 
oughly believed that it only needed our combined action, our master en- 
thusiasm to reproduce these epochs and we were certain that the}' were 
going to come in our lifetime. 

We were led through the great periods w'hen the united religious en- 
thusiasms conspired together in the construction of those altogether most 
wonderful cathedrals of France, and then we jumped into the sunny period 
when the classic revival gripped the world and gave birth to the French 
chateaux. And on we were led through the varied and interesting expres- 
sion of the classic revival of the kings of France and England with their 
great and glorious gardens and estates of the nobles into our colonial refine- 
ments ; and there we seemed to suddenly stop. 

The world then becomes a practical evil, our architecture seems to ofifer 
no inspiration ; we were through then for the time with enthusiasm. We 
enter the period of individualism started bj' our great Richardson, and we 
come marching on to the present day when every man seems to be aiming 
in his own particular and peculiar direction and no longer do we seem to 
have the great men to follow. Now, what does it all mean? ^^'here are we' 
going? What will be the next type of expression? Where is the trend? 

We return once more to the immediate present and the feeling of resent- 
ment that has been left by our client. W'e have labored over his particular 
building, spent night working for a satisfactory and a convenient arrange- 
ment in plan, we have gone through hundreds of plates in our fondest 
library books; we finally believe that we have obtained the best possible 
solution. 

We have discussed at length all the most advantageous methods of con- 
struction with our engineer: w^e have gone over with our draughtsmen their 
drawings, day after day, and restudied them even after they were drawn on 
tracing cloth to ink ; we have carefully described our building to the 
minutest detail in our specifications and now we have a client on our hands 
who only gives us adverse criticism. A wife's uncle has criticised the 
mantel detail ; the contractor has failed to figure accurately a partition : a 
desk does not fit; a gas heater fails to work; a spot occurs in the ceiling 
from defective plumbing: the architect is immediately blamed for it all and 
all the conscientious care and thought that has otherwise gone to make the 
building a success is utterly ignored by our fond client. 

We are in despair. Again, and perhaps still again, occurs the greatest of 
all difficulties — the cost of our client's building has gone beyond the 
original estimate. Immediately word goes out to his friends and his 
friends' friends, that the architect is a visionary; that he is unbusinesslike; 

•Paper read at annual convention of .\rch:tectural League of the Pacific Coast, Seattle, Wash. 



84 The Architect and Engineer 

rhat he is incapable of handling a financial proposition. His friends and 
bis friends' friends subsequently build. They go to a contractor who 
charges them not one solitary cent for the cost of preparing plans, the extras 
are absorbed and the contractor becomes the hero — at least for the time 
being. The owner draws up his own plans and any contractor will figure 
from them. 

Once more, where are our dreams? What has become of the profession 
of architecture? \\'ill we have to wait for the public to learn its lesson, to 
find that the buildings so designed, so constructed under the supervision of 
the contractor, is of an ephemeral nature ; that the design is only of mo- 
mentary value ; that the plan is not serviceable e.xcept for the most imme- 
diate uses: that the construction and materials are of the poorest quality 
and become shabby within a short period of time? 

The purpose of an architect, as we know it, is to maintain the standard 
of design and construction of buildings ; to see that they are planned to 
serve the greatest economical and practical function : to see that the best 
and cheapest building materials are used, and that they are put in place in 
the best and most efficient way; to see that above all, when the building is 
finished, it expresses in its design its charactr and functions; that it will 
become a thing of beauty without which it has no lasting quality. 

With this big purpose, can it be supposed that the architect is no longer 
needed? If we look at our building records we find that only a small per- 
centage (we estimated at one time 17 per cent) of the work done in our 
city was done through architects' offices. We certainly, as a profession, 
cannot exist without the public. The public can, as it is showing us, exist 
without us. It seems most improbable that if the above is our function 
that the public will, in the long, continue to build its structures in an in- 
ferior way when there is one proper, ordinary and sane method of pro- 
cedure — the employment of an architect. 

This has been true throughout the ages and it will continue to be true. 
The architect serves a definite function ; he is needed by the public, and 
they will insist upon his serving them. < Jur thick-skinned client (we will 
have to admit at this point that his epidermis is not always of this nature ; 
that we have had most delightful experiences with the species and draw 
from it some of our best friends). 

But we are certainly misunderstood, generally speaking, by the public 
and this misunderstanding can only, it seems, be properly overcome by 
going before the public and stating our case; telling it what architecture is; 
what the functions of the architect are, and how he serves the public in an 
economical way ; that he does not exist merely to put frosting on a wedding 
cake, but that his duties are interwoven in every detail of arrangement, 
plan and economy of a structure. Let us each go out and not always blame 
the public or .our clients until we have gone before them and explained 
our position more fully, taking advantage of every opportunity' through the 
press, through our schools, through our uni\ersities, and through our popu- 
lar magazines. 

The profession of an architect is one that serves in a constructive 
capacity and touches our people at innumerable vital points, ^^'e must as- 
sume our responsibilities and put our proposition to them in an impelling 
way ; we must systematize our methods of getting our services so that the 
public understands them. We shall, without question, succeed in accom- 
plishing this and our client will then become a more appreciative being 
and the difficulties which we have encountered will be far easier to over- 
come because we will have his confidence at the start, and although we may 
make mistakes occasionally as individuals, he will not blame the entire 
profession. 



The Architect and Engineer 85 

The Architect and the Client* 

A Banker Speaks on the Subject 

NOTWITHSTANDING the fact that I hve close to two architects and I 
have one in my family, I am perfectly amicably disposed toward the 
profession, and may truly say that I always have dwelt in good relations 
with its members. I may say that I expect to do so until such time as I shall 
build something of my own. 

While I say this with a frivolous revelry and abandon, I note that you 
assume that in it there lies concealed a subtle something, about which I am 
going to trespass on your good nature and amiability. 

One is not often given a chance to talk to architects and tell them, as a 
crowd, just what one thinks of them. I am somewhat peculiarly situated in 
regard to this. I have worked in an architect's office and have studied archi- 
tecture and building and am one of those so-called business men who are 
supposed not to know the aims, ambitions, and hopes of the men of your 
profession, and am also one of that body of men who continually offend by 
refusing to recognize the ethics of your profession. 

Perhaps it was fortunate for me that I was brought up in the atmosphere 
which was always redolent of the carnage of battle between the artistic temper- 
ament and the commercial temperament, and I am quite sure that I am not 
mistaken when I say that there is a great deal to be said on both sides of this 
question, and that there is a great deal that has been left unsaid by the archi- 
tects, which in duty to themselves and to the public requires to be said. 

You may have noted a remarkable fact in regard to the average x\merican 
business man. in that there is no question which he feels quite as unable to 
master easily as the question regarding art or architecture. This feeling is 
largely due,' of course, to unfamiliarity with the subject as well as to a con- 
tempt' for its mastery — a feeling which has been engendered by an exclusiveness 
of aim and attainment on the part of those who practice it. It seems to me 
that it is possible to bring about a more complete understanding of your work 
and its necessities by the adoption of a few simple principles, one of the first 
of which is that the public be made to understand the architect's point of view. 

We must remember that all professions dealing in imaginative qualities of 
work have had, from time immemorial, difficulties of understanding as between 
principles and clients, and architecture has this difficulty because, if the client 
had these qualities, he need only employ a carpenter or builder. 

Perhaps you may remember how indignant was Michael Angelo when he 
overhead the Pope and one of his advisers criticising his work and methods, 
and how his indignation got the better of him and he upset the paint on their 
heads from his scaffold. 

Perh"aps we can go further back than that, even to the remote ages, and 
remember the sadness of the ancient Chinese painter who, overwhelmed by 
continuous criticisms and misunderstandings> retired into the painting which 
he had made in order that he might retain his peace and happiness. 

All our earlier artists and architects suffered from the universal lack of 
knowledge of art and from an improper understanding of its necessities ; but, 
in spite of that, and, I might say, by favor of that, they were able to produce 
lasting things. 

Richardson suffered from this as nnich if not more than than any architect, 
and I could cite you nunerous cases of apparent disregard of the feelings, 
opinions, or intelligence of architects, artists, and sculptors. 

'Abstract of an address delivered bv Mr, Oliver La Farge to the members of the .Architectural 
League of the Pacific Coast at Seattle. Washington. 



86 The Arcliifcct a)id Engineer 

Almost universally, may it be pointed out that an understanding would have 
been easily possible provided the professional man had been willing to unbend 
and become a teacher to his client. 

In all cases you will find that the impatience of the so-called practical man 
of affairs with the imaginative qualities of architects is due in part to three 
or four things : 

First. Lack of knowledge of the cost of drawing. 

Second. Lack of explicit determination of what the client is paying for. 

Third. Lack of imagination — 4;hat is, lack of understanding — of what the 
architect's function really is. 

Fourth. Lack of evidence of commercial return on good design as well 
as planning. 

Now as to the first: It is a problem how to get this into the lay mind, but 
I assure you it can be done if the architect himiself keeps a cost account of his 
draughting as he should ; yet there are many architects who do not keep such 
a cost account and therefore cannot explain to the client in details of dollars 
and cents and hours and minutes. If they keep such a system, there is nothing 
that will interest the commercial client more than an exposition of it. 

Now as to the second : A definite method of charging is professionally 
correct and should be adhered to, but the public usually misunderstands what 
is meant by supenision, and wherever you find a client you will very likely 
find him confident that he is not getting the supervision to which he is entitled. 
I believe that a complete understanding on this point before proceeding saves 
many difficulties and much expense to architects. 

Now the last two difficulties, which are really due to a lack of education, 
can be remedied (and I believe they have been somewhat remedied), first, 
by keeping to the standard of your profession and demanding recognition of 
your standards, and also by a constant exposition of the work of the architect, 
what he has done for the community and what he can do, and what he supplies 
that the other man lacks. 

It has seemed to me that a practical book, on the plan of Mr. Richard Kurd's 
book on real estate values, would be of great value not only to architects but 
to the public. I presume many architects are famiiliar with that book. It 
gives the history of city growth, and the land, building and rental values of 
many cities which, of course, are closely related to the question of proper 
planning. It gives many examples in photographs of rental values sacrificed 
by architectural blunders in planning, and on the whole, I think there has 
been no book written on that subject as good as this one. 

My own business is mortgage banking; that is, savings-deposits invested 
in city mortgages. To us, during periods such as we have had in the last 
few years, the only real basis of appraisal of real estate for mortgage is the 
rental basis, because of the lack of sales of real estate. The rental basis of a 
loan depends in jiart upon the good planning of the building, and in part upon 
its location, but the major portion depends upon good planning. This depends 
upon the architect. So, you may see that after all we are closely allied— if you 
do good work we can do good work — and just so much as a savings bank is 
able to invest its funds wisely and safely in a community, just so much better 
and richer is that community ; it is being constructed by its own people, and 
is just so much more able to employ good architects. 

I believe that architects, as a ride, are the best professional men of any 
community. I have always found them alert, filled with civic pride, and very 
human, and the most delightful men as friends. I have usually found them 
controlled bv two very strong motives ; a constant wish to do honor and justice 
to their profession, and a desire to please their clients, of course not counting 



The Architect and Engineer 87 

the anxiety we all have to get the job. The control by associations is a good 
thing, but I beg you to remember that your client cares nothing for rules and 
regulations, and you must educate him to a belief in your capabilities, and not 
present him with a printed slip of what the Institute decrees professionally. 
You can do this now. where you could not do it twenty years ago. 

There are occasional lapses by the public but the emphatic expression of 
outrage by the people of the world at the recent destruction of the architectural 
monuments in France and Belgium must convince you that the people are 
generally assured of the value of good architectural work. 

My conclusion is that the successful architect is the one who can handle 
the public without offense to its sensibilities, and still cling to the high ideals 
of his profession. 

A Plea for the Preservation of the Present 
Architectural Beauty of the Ferry Building 

Editor The Architect and Engineer of California: — The subject of the 
traffic congestion at the foot of ^larket street, San Francisco, at the Ferry 
Building, which is before the people of San Francisco at this time, is of 
great importance to both the present and the future generation. 

In surface planning, as suggested in the plans printed in the November 
Architect and Engineer, we have no advantages over what is already in 
general use today. And besides, if these plans are to be followed, I fail to 
see where we would be adding anything to the appearance of the present 
structure; on the other hand, we would sitnply destroy what architectural 
beauty there is now. 

The widening' of Market street at the ferry would be a good idea, as it 
would give a freedom to the whole plan, which is now in a cramped posi- 
tion. And if we are to thus consider the beauty of the situation from an 
architectural viewpoint, I would suggest that this be carried out. The 
Ferry building is a gem within our great city, and it should not be dis- 
figured by anything so unsightly as suggested in your November number. 

Let us build simple, if we must, but in harmony, and not carry out some- 
thing that we know will be in the present and the future an eye sore to our 
conceptions. The only true solution of this problem is the subway plan. 
Here we have the advantages of carrying out all that can be desired, both 
architecturally and in the matter of solving the traffic congestion problem. 

\\"e have come to love our Ferry building with an immortal love, and 
lor the sake of relieving the traffic congestion, let us not lessen this im- 
mortal love, not while we have other means to preserve its beauty — other 
than surface planning. 

The planning of underground conveyance could be carried out more 
extensively than we perhaps realize. We do not want to build and tear 
dow-n. Let us build so we may add without tearing down. 

I suggest if we must use the Embarcadero for ornamental purposes, let 
us erect something that will be in keeping with the general appearance 
and design of the present surroundings. 

Here in the center of the Embarcadero we may erect a beautiful foun- 
tain symbolizing our beloved San Francisco, surrounded by her courtiers 
who have brought fame to her throughout the world. Let this fame de- 
velop into the realization of our true love for her ; and then we shall ha\ e 
justified the means to an end. 

GUY OUINTIN DOANE. 

1827 j^ Addison street, Berkeley, California. 



88 The Architect and Engineer 

The Human Side of the Architect 

JAMES STEPHEN', in the Pacinc Builder and Engineer* 

MANY a good fellow is wrapped up in a shell of formal dignity which, if 
pierced, would disclose a kindred spirit. 
The architect, with his artistic temperament and high ideals, on 
a close diagnosis, we fear, would prove to be quite human. 

In our day we are much given to organizing societies and associations 
with high-sounding names which, after learning to enunciate clearly, we 
take a certain pleasure in repeating with a glibness acquired by long 
practice. 

A few daj's ago a gentleman called at my office and introduced himself 
somewhat in this wise: "I am the president of the Rainier \'alley Sunday 
School Association, an auxiliary of the King County Sunday School Asso- 
ciation," etc. Of course I was impressed by this tremendous title and was 
about ready to kow-tow when I succeeded in getting tmder his epidermis 
only to find him just a man and a very good fellow. 

It so happens by the grace of council appointment that I hold the office 
of president of the \\'ashington State Chapter of the American Institute of 
Architects, a truly impressive title and one that compels our respect, so 
awe-inspiring is at that we involuntarily begin an inventory of our person 
to see if our necktie has sagged or a vagrant button slipped its moorings. 

Xaturally. we assume a certain formal attitude and demeanor at the 
meetings and functions of our high-sounding, long-named association. At 
these gatherings we have listened in times past with more or less pleasure, 
not to mention patience, to long, carefully prepared papers full of glowing 
enthusiasm, lofty ideals and sparkling with well chosen gems of thought, 
a seeming effort to reduce to an essence the combined wisdom of the dic- 
tionary and the encyclopedia. 

It is no far cry to imagine one of these writers on the morning following 
his masterlv peroration engaged in a futile effort to convince his client that 
the commercial building that he is planning should stand on an obviously 
substantial base, only to have his suggestions brushed aside b}' this busi- 
ness juggernaut who demands that all supports for upper stories, be they 
one or ten, be kept well back of the window plane and covered with mirrors 
to complete the illusion, leaving the architect's dream floating on a sea of 
plate glass. 

Can you wonder that the loft}' idealism, shocked, suppressed and buf- 
feted by a cruel and unappreciative world, finds in his association a haven 
of refuge wherein and in the presence of kindred spirits he may unburden 
his soul of its longings? 

Are we not inclined to take ourselves too seriously : at least to have the 
other fellow believe we are what we are not, and even try to convince our- 
selves that the clay of which we are made is a superior kind of mud and 
not the ordinary blue stuff with, it may be, a streak of yellow? 

It is quite possible that in our efforts to preserve the dignity of the pro- 
fession that we assume too much dignity in our own persons. 

How often it happens that we do not really discover the man within his 
shell of reserve until some crisis or emergenc\- shocks him into an exposure 
of his real self, which generally discloses finer traits of character than we 
had given him credit for. 

At a recent fiuiction we were regaled with a story of George B. Post, 
wherein he was discovered in a fluently profane discussion with a fractious 

'President Washington Stale Chapter American Institute of Architects, Seattle. 



The Architect and Ent^incer 8') 

Irishman digging post holes, a momentary uncovering of the human side of 
this great man (not the Irishman). 

Among children the favorite diversion is playing make-believe, and as 
they grow up into man and womanhood they still play the game but give 
it another name — bluffing, or grown up make-believe ; and who among us 
does not put up the bluff? 

Holding the office of president of this august body puts one under con- 
stant fear of doing or not doing something which might lower the dignity 
of the office. Being a humble member of this chapter is a wonderful de- 
terrent in keeping us out of questionable situations, hence the awful check 
exerted on the natural exuberance of the president. 

The writer is fond of a picture show, but owing to his exalted position 
and fearing a lapse of dignity, looks carefully up and down the street to see 
if he is observed before entering one. On a recent occasion, after making 
the usual reconnaissance and finding the coast apparently clear, we got out 
the exact admission fee and made a dive for the entrance of a Second-avenue 
picture house and sat down in an obscure seat, feeling that we had not been 
discovered, and then the lights were turned up. Much to my amazement, 
and to his, I discovered in the man sitting next to me one of the most digni- 
fied members of our chapter, who rather apologetically began a feeble 
attempt to justify his presence by an assumption of looking up the angle of 
projection, while I must confess to a similar elifort, giving as my reason a 
study of acoustics. Of course he knew, and I knew, and he knew that I 
knew that he knew that we had both dropped in with more or less de- 
liberation just to see the pictures. \\'hy didn't we say so? Why not be 
human? 



[We had the same experience the other day when we dropped into a 
Market street "movie" and found seated close by a usually very busy San 
Francisco architect, who, from outward appearances and general air of 
aristocracy, would not deign be seen at anything less expensive than a 
grand opera. And do you know what excuse he offered? Had been work- 
ing on a problem all morning. Was nervous and no appetite, so dropped into 
the picture show during the noon hour for relaxation ! 

Speaking of architects and the "movies," the writer knows of a San 
Francisco architect who used to be an almost daily patron of the "cock-tail 
route" up and down Market street. Now he is a "tee-totaler," and he finds 
quite as much satisfaction and diversion in visiting the nickelodeons, 
sprinkled along both sides of Market street, as he used to find patronizing 
the bar-rooms. This architect starts out about 11 o'clock in the morning and 
saunters up one side of the street and down the other, stopping at about the 
same number of movie houses as he used to visit saloons. Inside the 
theaters you will invariably find him way down front, where he feels safe 
from observation. After all, there is nothing' to be ashamed of in his daily 
indulgence of the pictures; surely 'tis infinitely better than fighting John 
Barlevcorn ! — Ed.l 



Pointers 

"Business is a matter to give and get. 

And what you get depends on what you give. 

Give a knock and you get a knock ; 

Give a boost and you get a boost ; 

Give service and 3^ou get profit." — Selected. 



90 The .-Irchitcct and Engineer 

A New Type of Artificial Swimming Pool* 

THE need of artificial swimming pools in our thickly populated districts 
is coming to be more and more cleai"ly recognized by every one who 
thinks seriously of the important problem of physical education, and 
our urban Park Commissioners and Boards of Education must soon enter 
upon extensive campaigns of swimming pool construction. A great diffi- 
cult}', however, is that the problem of keeping an artificial swimming pool 
clean is coming more and more to be thought of as impossible of solution. 
A very careful study** of thirty-five swimming pools in Connecticut, New 
York and Xew Jersej' recently made under the direction of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Xew York City shows that the great majority 
even of the carefully conducted pools are more or less filthy. Only one 
pool out of the thirty-five was shown to be actually clean. In this pool 
the water was changed only once or twice a week, and continuous filtration 
was employed at a rate sufficient to turn over, in about forty-eight hours 
an amount of water equal to the contents of the pool. This same pro- 
cedure was followed in most of the pools which were studied, the dif- 
ference being that in this particular pool rigid rules were very scrupulously 
enforced as to the evacuation of bladder and bowels and as to the washing 
of the body before entering the pool, and as to spitting in the pool. Such 
necessary rules can, however, be strictly enforced only when a pool is used 
b}' a fairly homogeneous group like the students in a college, and even then 
there is always a chance of serious pollution. Now, it is no great satis- 
faction to the prospective user of a public swimming pool to know that 
the washings from the body of another person are innocuous in nine hundred 
and ninety-nine cases out of a thousand ! Indeed fastidiousness is, in its 
essence, the instinctive appreciation of the seriousness of the one case in a 
thousand ! An improved system of operation of the public swimming pool 
is necessary, as any one must realize who considers how the average person 
hesitates to wash his hands in a basin of used water and how almost un- 
thinkable a second-turn bath is even in the privacy of the family! 

Professor W. S. Franklin of Lehigh University has worked out a plan 
which makes it feasible to install a swimming pool of the largest size and 
keep it as clean as hourly scrubbing and hourly changes of water can make 
it ; at a cost which is no greater than the cost of operating a pool under the 
old system, and in a place where the w-ater supply is neither abundant nor 
cheap. The plan involves three distinct elements as follows : 

(a) The installation of a large sand filter alongside of the pool with a 
capacity sufficient to turn over the water in the pool from twelve to twentj'- 
four times per day depending on the number of persons using the pool. It 
is well known that very badly polluted river water and even actual sewage 
can be made drinkable bj' the use of a sand filter, and water which has been 
in a swimming pool for an hour or two can be easily and repeatedly puri- 
fied b}- a sand filter. It is the common practice at present to install a con- 
tinuous filter in connection with a swimming pool, and the capacity of this 
filter is usually sufficient to turn over, in forty-eight hours, a quantity of 
water equal to the contents of the pool. The suggested installation of a 
sand filter carries with it the idea of filtering the water at an enormously 
increased rate. 

(b) The use of a lightly framed bulk-head which is pushed slowly from 
one end of the pool to the other by the inflowing pure water, thus entirely 

*The novel features of design and construction which are here described are covered by applica- 
tions for United States patents. 

**See American Physical Education Review. December. 1912. 



The Architect and Engineer 



91 



>^\'\VVV^ 




i^ 



Fig. 1 




Fig. 2 



92 The Architect and Engi)iecr 

preventing the mixing of the inflowing pure water with the used water in 
the pool. The advantage of this moving bulk-head is an enormous increase 
of efficiency of the sand filter by preventing the mixing of the inflowing 
pure water with the used water in the pool. In all existing pools the filtered 
water is allowed to mix with the used water, so that about one-eighth of the 
old water remains in a pool after a quantity of water equal to three times 
the contents of the pool has passed through the filter. The moving bulk- 
head would certainly produce a four-fold increase of efficiency of the filter. 

(c) The use of the moving bulk-head for automatically scrubbing the 
bottom and side walls of the pool as it travels back and forth along the 
pool. Frequent scrubbing of the sides and bottom of a pool is necessary, 
and the only method now available is to empty a pool and wash it out by 
hand. Professor Franklin's plan provides for a slight lowering of the 
water level in front of the traveling bulk-head so that the bulk-head is pushed 
along by the inflowing fresh water, and the scraping and rubbing action 
of the closely fitting bulk-head provides for a thorough scrubbing. When 
the bulk-bead reaches the end of the pool it passes over a number of by- 
pass channels in one of the side walls of the pool so that the pure water 
flows around the bulk-head and sweeps across between the bulk-head and 
the end of the pool, thus eliminating every drop of used water from the 
pool. At this time the inner face of the bulk-head and the end of the pool 
can be swabbed by hand. The by-pass channels are provided with light 
valves which close whgn the flow of water is reversed thus causing the bulk- 
head to start on its return travel. 

The essential details of the moving bulk-head are shown in Figs. 1 and 
2 ; Fig. 1 is a front view and Fig. 2 is a top view. A light steel truss bridges 
across the pool and rests upon two two-wheel trucks which run on two 
rails, one on each side of the pool. Two pinion-racks are placed alongside 
of the rails, two pinions gear into these racks, and the two pinions are keyed to a 
shaft which reaches across the pool and is supported by the light steel 
truss. The steel truss presents a flat surface on top which serves as a 
narrow runway, and the truss and trucks are strong enough to support 
any number of persons who may sit or stand upon it or who may climb upon 
it by means of the ladders which are attached to it. The bulk-head itself 
is made of a large sheet of galvanized steel with a wooden plank screwed to 
its lower edge, and this sheet of steel with its attached plank is held in the 
frame-work of the truss with its entire weight resting on the bottom of the 
pool. When the board becomes badly worn the sheet of steel can be hoisted 
out of the frame-work of the truss, and a new board attached to it. The 
sheet of steel has vertical boards attached to its ends, these boards reach to 
within about half an inch of the side walls, deep grooves are cut in the 
edges of these vertical boards, in these grooves are placed two tongues 
made of three-quarter inch boards, and these tongues are pushed against 
the side walls by springs. The edges of the bottom and end boards 
'tongues) give the desired scraping and scrubbing action, and water rushes 
through between the scraping edge and the polished cement surface wher- 
ever there may be failure of actual scraping contact. A tongue of com- 
pressed cloth may be set into the scraping edges if necessary. 

Satisfactory operation of the moving bulk-head requires the bottom and 
side walls of the pool to be made accurately plane, and the interior finish 
of the pool should meet three other important conditions, as follows : ( 1 ) 
The walls and bottom must be smooth so that dirt and algae growth can 
be cleaned off bv scrubbing; (2) The interior finish should be such as to 



The Arcliitcct and Ejr^iiiccr 

I entrance 



93 



IT 



hooks 

immi ii i i i ii mimmnn i 



o O 
o O 



I I II II I INI I I illli™ 



b M\ 



TTT 



O o 
O o 
O o 

— d' 



showers hooks 

i ii in i n i mi i iii ii n ii ii i iH i 



W b' 



iiii M i m i i ii i i M iiii i i I 



1 1 1 1 I " ' ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



pool 20 X 40 X 7. ft. 



pool 20 X 40 X 4 ft. 



Fig. 3. 



show up the cleanness of the water, and (3) The finish of the bottom and 
sides should be such as to give to a diver a distinct sense of the depth of 
the water. 

Any one who has noticed the smoothness of a well made concrete side- 
walk after it has been rubbed down a little by traffic must admit that such 
a surface would be smooth enough for the interior of a swimming pool. 
Indeed a concrete walk becomes extremely smooth if the surface cement 
contains finely crushed limestone which is soft enough to wear dov^m under 
the action of shoe leather. To bring out strikingly the cleanness or tur- 
bidity of the water, the bottom of the pool must present a clearly defined 
pattern with sharp edges and strong contrasts. To give to a diver a dis- 
tinct sense of depth the side walls should also present a sharp pattern. 

Professor Franklin proposes the following construction of the pool bot- 
tom to meet the above requirements. After the bottom of the pool has 
been laid in rough concrete with or without a water tight layer of asphalt 
and paper, a checker work of narrow strips of milled slate or molded cement 
(blackened by mineral pigment) is laid over the bottom, and these narrow 
strips are wedged up by thin metal wedges to an accurately plane surface 
on top. As this checker work is laid, the open squares are nearlv filled with 
ordinary cement grouting which is worked to some extent under the narrow 
strips, when this grouting is hard the squares are filled with a special 
cement which is known in the trade as 'iily white" cement, and the whole 
is then rubbed down to a smooth surface by a very moderate amount of 
grinding. The surface cement would be perhaps best made by using finely 
crushed marble or calcite instead of silica sand. 

The side walls of the pool are of concrete molded between vertical slabs 
of cement on one side and a board frame on the other side, the vertical 
cement slabs being tied to the concrete by projecting screws. The cement 



94 



The Architect and Engineer 

roof 




Fig. 4. 
Section along A B oi Fig. 3. 



slabs are made as follows : On a smooth cement floor (the finished floor of 
the pool for example) a sheet of wet paper is stretched, a rectangular frame 
of one-inch strips is laid flat upon this paper and thin squares of slate or 
molded black cement are arranged inside of the frame in any desired pat- 
tern. A thin coating of white cement is then thrown up>on the paper and 
slate blocks by a broom or air blast, and when this thin layer of cement has 
hardened slightly so as to hold the slate blocks in position, a layer of 
cement coming up to the top of the one-inch strips is spread over the whole. 
Then a sheet of wire gauze or expanded metal is laid on the cement, a 
second frame of one-inch strips is placed on top of the first, and another 
layer of cement is spread over the whole and finished sufficiently smooth 
and flat for the building of another slab on top of it; and so on. When the 
slabs are hard they are turned with their figured faces upwards and white 
cement is spread into the flaws to give a smooth surface. The faces are 
then polished by a moderate amount of grinding. Small metal blocks, 
tapped for screws, are laid into the backs of the slabs while the slabs are 
being made, and screws are screwed into these blocks to provide for the 
tying of the slabs to the molded concrete wall. 

Another important feature which is proposed by Professor Franklin is 
a layout which so far facilitates the work of inspection and attendance as to 
make it easily possible, in the case of a small natatorium, for a single at- 
tendant to look after everything when the natatorium is being used by one 
sex onh', two attendants being employed when the natatorium is being 
used by both sexes. The layout is shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The middle- 
weight lines in Fig. 3 represent high screens of corrugated steel. The man 
attendant stands on a platform M. which is about two feet higher than the 
floor of the dressing rooms or locker alleys and five or six feet higher than 
the platforms which surround the pools ; and the platform i^I is surrounded 
on three sides by a low counter, a, b and c. The man attendant takes in 
entrance fees from men and boys at a and operates an entrance stile ; he 
serves out towels and soap : he looks over the low splash screen d to see the 
showers in use, he looks into the closets and locker alleys, and looking 
over c he has a view of the whole of both pools. The men and boy patrons 
present themselves in a nude condition at the counter b to be inspected be- 
fore receiving bathing suits or before passing down the stairs at e to the 
pools. Similarly a woman inspector stands on the raised platform W ; 
and hand wheels are conveniently located so that either inspector can 
operate all of the valves for controlling the hydraulic arrangements of the 
pools and filters. 



The Architect and Engineer 95 

The pools shown in Figs. 3 and 4 have been designed for Sabetha, Kan- 
sas, and everything possible has been done to reduce the consumption of 
water. Each shower consists of a supply pail with a few feet of rubber 
tubing connected to it, and two showers together constitute a unit ; one of 
the showers having a one-quart supply pail and the other a five-quart pail. 
The bather removes the one-quart pail from its shelf, fills it with warm 
water at a hydrant (hydrants are not shown in the figure), places it on its 
support and soaps himself thoroughly. He then fills the five-quart pail 
and rinses himself thoroughly. The closets shown in the figure are of the 
dry type, and odors are to be eliminated by using two small electric fans 
and a tall ventilating flue for each set of closets. The arrangement shown 
in Figs. 3 and 4 will cost about $5000 with only 50 lockers installed at first. 
The floors are to be of cheap wooden construction, and the scraping of the 
filter beds is to be done from one end. 

The pools shown in Figs. 3 and 4 will accommodate a maximum of 30 
swimmers and 30 learners, or, reckoning on an average of 45 minutes in the 
pools for each person with open hours from 10 to 12 A. M., and 2 to 6 and 
8 to 10 P. M., a maximum of 640 bathers can be accommodated each dav. 
The filters will turn over the water in both pools in two hours, and with 
the above schedule the water in the pools will be as fresh and clean at the 
beginning of each of the three periods as if it were drinking water in well- 
cleaned glasses, and while in actual use the water will be changed and the 
sides and bottoms scrubbed once every two hours. 

The pools shown in Figs. 3 and 4 contain about 70,000 gallons of water, 
and the cost of operating them on the old plan with semi-weekly changes 
of water would be $14 per week for ivatcr alone at 10 cents per thousand 
gallons, and the old plan involves the following additional items of expense 
to keep the pools in condition, namely, interest and depreciation on the 
usual pump and filter equipment, cost of power for operating the pump, 
and cost of labor of washing out the pools twice a week. On the other 
hand, the filter beds in Figs. 3 and 4 together with all hydraulic equipment 
represent a cost of about $1500 over the cost of the bare pools and dressing 
rooms, and the cost of operating the filters is $17.10 per week counting 
interest and depreciation at 10 per cent per year, counting 10 cents per 
kilowatt-hour for energy to drive pump, counting on filling the pools once 
every month with new water at 10 cents per thousand gallons, counting 
$24 every eight weeks at the cost of scraping and reforming the sand filters, 
and assuming a swimming season of 120 days. 



Requirements for the Admission of Architects to 
Practice 

THE report of the Committee on Legislation, presented to the forty- 
eighth annual convention of the American Institute of Architects, 
contains much that seems to be of both general and timely interest. 
The subject of licensing architects or admitting them to practice, as the 
institute prefers to term it, is one that will require study and definite deter- 
mination within the next two or three years. If the advantages outweigh 
the objections, as now seems to be the general impression, every possible 
effort should be made to secure the enactment of laws containing uniform 
provisions in all states. If, on the other hand, further study and investiga- 
tion gives conclusive evidence that such a law is in danger of eventually 



96 The Architect and Engineer 

becoming a check to architecture, it is well that it should be known, in 
order that proper means can be employed to prevent a spread of an unde- 
sirable form of legislation. The committee referred to goes on record as 
follows : — 

We believe, after careful analysis of laws now in force for the admission of architects 
to practice, and the reports showing their practical! workings, that it can be said, first, 
that architects should be admitted to practice, and that the states having licence laws 
have proven that the public benefits thereby. We further believe : that if the laws 
in force are not improved in certain particulars, and if the profession as a body is not 
tor them, and a constant eye kept on their workings, that there are many reasons why 
they might eventually become a check to architecture and, of course, in that case a hurt 
to civilization. We believe : that any license law that is not primarily for the good of the 
public at large is not good for architects, and would be a boomerang to our profession. 
* * * We believe : that the present laws are deficient in not covering in their definitions 
of an architect, what an architect is. Most of the present laws define the qualifications 
of an architect in a way that would lead the public to believe that his principal duties are 
along structural and sanitary lines. While we know that he should have some knowledge 
of these matters, they are not by any means the principal qualifications of an architect, 
and the license laws should describe more fully what the qualifications of a practicing 
architect are. * * * The architect's most important qualification should be ability in the 
art of building, and the science of building should be secondarj-. The architect is not the 
highest authority on construction or sanitation, but he should be on planning, grouping, 
design and color. .Are not these latter requirements more necessary of possession by 
architects to help the public toward better architecture than knowledge of trusses and 
plumbing? 

This feeling of the committee, comments the American Architect, can be 
readily understood, and there is little doubt that the majority of architects 
would prefer to be known as men proficient in design and color, rather than 
as men who have expert knowledge of construction and sanitation. 

Hc)wever, laws heretofore enacted designed to regulate the practice of 
architecture b}' restricting it to those who have given satisfactory evidence 
of proper qualifications, have, as far as appear, been based upon the theory 
of police powers vested in legislatures to enact laws necessary to the pro- 
tection of life, limb and health. Moreover, where they have been tested 
their constitutionality has been established by reason of features that were 
lield to be proper means of safeguarding life, limb and health. In other 
words, it appears that the structural and sanitary features of buildings are, 
in the ej'es of the law, the only ones essential to the physical welfare of the 
public, and hence constitute the only valid excuse for a license law. 

It would be, of course, highly desirable to also regulate and hx artistic 
standards, if such a thing were possible, but it is not plain just at this time 
how this could be done. Even if it were possible, such action would not 
in any sense appear to justify lowering the standards or eliminating pres- 
ent requirements in matters of structural design and sanitation. These 
features are essential and necessary, and must be provided by someone. 
If the architect does not qualify and become responsible for them, someone 
else will, and it would seem as though such a course would tend to detract 
from or restrict his present position of authority in charge of building 
operations. There can be no objection to, and there are a great many 
things in favor of, adding to the present requirements for registration of 
architects, a more thorough knowledge of planning, design, grouping and 
color, but it would appear to be fatal to the success and even validity, per- 
haps, of a registration law to omit or make less rigid the present require- 
ments in matters afifecting the health or safety of those occupying or 
visiting structures designed by architects; and to our minds, such a course 
would also be unwise as tending to rob an architect of his position of 
supreme authority in connection with any building operation under his 
direction. While, as is stated by the committee, an architect can readily 



The Architect and Engineer 97 

employ engineers to design the structural and sanitary features of build- 
ings, the state has no assurance that he will always do so. and to admit an 
architect to practice relying upon the probability of his employing others 
more competent than himself to supply certain essential information and 
technical service appears as illogical as it would be to admit a physician to 
practice who was incapable of performing a diagnosis, on the assumption 
that he would employ a diagnostician to supply what he lacked, and that, 
after all. the administering of proper treatment or the operation was the 
great thing. 

It would undoubtedly be gratifying to have the public understand fully 
the architect's function, but we feel that it would be extremely unfortunate 
if it was to become convinced that the profession held in contempt the 
practical features of building, the features that contribute to the health, 
safety and physical comfort of those whose money is expended. Already 
there is an impression in the public mind that architects are. as a class, 
impractical, and some members of the profession have been to considerable 
trouble to convince prospective clients that such impression was erroneous, 
at least in their own case, and that it would be unwise to divide their com- 
mission, employing an architect for onh' such features as he professed pro- 
ficiency in, as grouping, planning, design and color, and engineers for the 
balance of the work. There has always been some difficultv in explaining 
a demand for authority over matters concerning which onlj- a general or 
superficial knowledge is claimed, and we expect this to increase with a 
clearer understanding of the situation b}^ the public. Unless architects are 
willing to become proficient in all the essentials of their calling and have the 
fact known, there is undoubted danger of their being eventually deprived 
of some of the authority and emoluments that they now enjoy. In that 
event it might not be necessary to license them as they would no longer 
be in a position to endanger the public health or safety any more than would 
the painter, sculptor or poet. In fact they would then be much in the same 
class so far as their work and its effect upon the ]iublic was concerned. 

Corrosion of Steel in Concrete 

SPEAKING on this subject some time ago. Dr. ^^^ H. Walker, Director 
of the Research Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, said that every engineer is well aware of the 
fact that acidulated water, no matter how small the percentage of acid may 
be. tends to corrode steel by increasing the number of hydrogen ions 
present. It had been made clear, from tests he carried out, that there were 
certain alkaline substances present in concrete which corrected any acidity, 
and so protected the contained metal work from corrosion. This fact has 
an important bearing upon the question whether concrete will protect iron 
or steel from corrosion. Inasmuch as Portland cement, when it sets or 
hardens, liberates a quantity of caustic lime, which is a stronp^ alkali, the 
answer to the question must be in the aftirmati\e. Iron or steel will not 
corrode when imbedded in good concrete. But caustic lime is soluble in 
'.vater. and poorly made concrete is not impervious to moisture. There- 
lore, if iron be imbedded in concrete through which water is allowed at any 
time to percolate, this calcium hydrate will be slowly but surely dissolved. 
With it will disappear the inhibiting action of the concrete: and iron em- 
bedded therein will, in time, rust and become corroded. To ensure abso- 
lute protection of the reinforcing members of concrete construction, there- 
fore, such concrete must be of good cjuality. and sufficiently dense and care- 
fully made to render it waterproof. 



98 The Architect and Engineer 

Faults of Engineers from the Contractor's Viewpoint 

IXTERESTIXG observations bearing upon the relationship of the engineer 
to the contractor are contained in a paper presented recently before the 
Albany Society of Civil Engineers, by Mr. Richard \V. Sherman, Chief 
Engineer of the New York State Consenation Commission. The follow- 
ing extracts from this paper are printed in a recent number of Engineering 
and Contracting: 

Contractors are largely iniluenced by their opinions of engineers. The engineer who 
has a reputation lor ability, honesty, fairness and good disposition, will attract bidders 
for any work of which he has charge and the desire to do work under him would be an 
incentive to reasonably low prices. On the contrary, if contractors consider an engineer 
incompetent, dishonest, an inebriate or of a cranky disposition, they will often avoid 
bidding on the work of which he has charge or add to their bids a sum which they hope 
will cover the excess cost of the work due to the unfavorable attributes in the make-up 
of the engineer. It is a feature of contracting to "size up" the engineer with as much 
accuracy as possible, and many contractors become very e.xpert thereat. 

In bidding for work, contractors are almost as sensitive as weather vanes. As a rule, 
they run quite a risk of loss if they bid too low ; and the engineer is at least one of the 
most important features in the situation, as by reason of the characteristics of the 
engineer it may be possible to make a profit at a given bid under one engineer and im- 
possible to avoid a loss under some other engineer with all conditions, aside from the 
engineer himself, precisely similar. 

Contractors who do not care for the contract often bid fairly high without any 
expectation of securing the contract, but m.erely to avoid a reputation among contractors 
of being low bidders and with the bare chance of getting the work at good prices. Ex- 
cessively high bids are usually the result of lack of knowledge of the value of the work, 
lack of time to become familiar with it, and not infrequently from a variety of reasons 
by which the engineer has been "sized up" so unfavorably by some contractors that they 
do not want the work under him, are prejudiced against him and the work and conse- 
quently unintentionally or otherwise bid too high. The treatment which bidders think 
they will receive from the engineer if they secure the work is an important feature of the 
bidding. 

If an engineer's preliminary estimate is believed to be too low it drives away bidders 
and tends to indifferent high bidding. Some over-anxious contractors may be influ- 
enced thereby to bid too low. They may secure the work, in which event the engineer 
has an unpleasant task during construction. There is almost sure to be a disposition on 
the part of the contractor to save himself from loss, and he is thus tempted to slight or 
cheat in the quality of the work which the engineer tries to prevent (as he should). 
The engineer, no matter how fair and just he may be to the contractor, will usually end 
with a feeling, of enmity toward him. Both contractor and engineer are in some degree 
injured by the work having been done at less than cost. It is detrimental to an engineer 
to make a practice of making his preliminary estimates higher than the prices at which 
it is later found the work can be let to reliable parties. On the other hand, great annoy- 
ance and trouble and. in most cases, detrimental features which in one way and another 
causes loss to the owner and detriment to the reputation of the engineer result from 
making preliminary estimates too low. 

In the matter of monthU- and final estimates, contractors, particularly those ignorant 
of engineering, are ver\- prone to suspect that engineers have under-estimated or cheated 
them. There never has been any good reason why contractors should not check up 
measurements and quantities even if it is necessary to employ contractors' engineers to 
do so. In large contracts this has been the custom for some years and is becoming more 
so. Many more engineers than formerly are engaged in contracting and this feature 
adds to the practice of contractors measuring and checking up estimates. It is to be 
hoped that this practice will become general. 

Great injustice has been done engineers, as many intelligent contractors know, by 
the perpetual suspicion that the engineer is under of having cheated contractors. There 
is seldom a motive other than spite for an engineer to cheat a contractor and the spite 
cases I believe to be very rare. In small works, for instance, such as \i!!age water- 
works and sewers, some engineers may be tempted to under-estimate in order to keep 
the cost of the work down to the preliminary- estimate or appropriations. I trust there 
are not many such, but I fear there are some. 

An indolent, indifferent engineer and also a procrastinator, are torments to contrac- 
tors and a cause of considerable unnecessary cost in executing the work. 



The Architect and Engineer 99 

Announcement 

A DEPARTMENT of City Planning and Housing, to be edited by 
Charles Henry Cheney. Secretary of the California Conference on 
City Planning, will be started in this magazine with the February 
number, in which will be run notes on the principal items of City Planning 
and Housing interest in California and elsewhere. As there are very few 
books published which cover this new subject, it will be the aim of this 
department to keep the readers of the magazine posted on new municipal 
reports and other data now being so rapidly brought out by many American 
cities and public agencies. In this connection there will also be a brief 
column of reviews of current articles on these subjects in architectural and 
town planning magazines. 

Following is a summarized report of the Town- Planning Committee of the American 
Institute of Architects : 

While the correction of laws governing endeavor in the direction of cits" planning 
falls largely within the domain of city and State politics, and therefore outside the 
activities of the Institute, as such, your committee believes that in the field of 
education, in the assistance it may lend to communities striving for a realization of 
new social ideals, it can. with the earnest co-operation of its various chapters, as 
time goes on. fit itself to perform a worthy service both to the profession and to 
the country. 

In fact, through the Journal the Institute is already engaged in disseminating 
much useful information, which is being put to good use in furthering the cause 
of city planning. It is interesting to note that Senator Borland of Missouri quoted 
from the Journal in support of his plea before the Senate, for the passage of the 
now celebrated "Alleys Bill" of Washington, and that in other ways the Journal 
has attracted the attention of Congress in relation to similar matters. It is hoped 
that the Journal may speak on these subjects with greater and greater authority 
as time passes, and it would seem highly desirable, therefore, that contact between 
this committee and the Journal should be intimate and constant. 

It is. therefore, recommended that the Committee on Town Planning be con- 
tinued: that it be provided with funds sufficient for it to proceed at once, independ- 
ently, without the assistance of the several chapters, if that seems best, with a 
program for equipping a bureau of definite information concerning city planning, 
embracing maps, plans, photographs and lantern-slides of executed and projected 
work, and copies of laws governing actual procedure and construction: that its 
headquarters be located where constant and intimate contact with the office of the 
Journal may be sustained. 

The committee which reported on this report recommended that the committee 
investigate the matter of co-operation with such bodies as the National City- 
Planning Conference, to the end that its work may be carried on without duplication 
and expense. The recommendation was approved by the convention. 

Mr. George B. Ford addressed the convention on the work of the National 
City-Planning Conference, and once again pointed out the duty of the architect 
to lead in city-planning work, since his qualifications fit him better for that task 
than those who are now trjing to lead. 

M. H. Whitehouse, 

Elmer Grev. 

W. R. B. WiLLCOX, Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
The Committee on Town Planning, pursuant to instructions of the last convention, 
has endeavored to ascertain whether the town-planning movement in the United States 
is widespread and genuine. It finds many communities appointing town-planning com- 
missions and receiving with considerable enthusiasm the reports of such commissioners, 
but little actual interest in providing the ways and means for carr>ing out their recom- 
mendations. The amount of space which the newspapers and magazines are devoting 
to this subject would seem to be a rare indication that people are interested, but the lack 
of tangible results would seem to indicate that the interest is superficial and attaches 
to the spectacular features and not to the fundamentals of cit>-planning. The committee 
recommends the equipment of a bureau of information embracing plans, photographs, 
lantern-slides and copies of laws governing procedure and construction, and that its 
headquarters be in intimate contact with the office of the Journal, through which its 
educational work may be carried on. The board is in hearty accord with these recom- 
mendations and hopes that during the coming year funds may be available to make a 
start in collecting the necessary material for such a bureau. 



100 



The Architect and Eni^iuca 




C EX T E R BAY, R O M .-I X CATHOLIC 
OKPHAX ASiLL.'i. SAX F^iAXClSCO 
SillTH O'BRIEX. ARCHITECT 

A LATE EXAMPLE OF GOOD BRICK IIORK 



The Architect and Eui^iin-cy 101 

The Antiquity of Brick 

BRICK, the venerable and reliable building material — unmistakabl}- the 
oldest thing- made by civilized man, as far as records determine — gives 
evidence of architecture on earth. It was the earliest substantial 
building material, and is the latest. Si.x thousand years of histor}' which 
embrace the entire known period of human civilization deal with brick. 
The earliest sunrise of enlightenment on the far-away plains of Babylonia. 
in the remotest time of which we have no man-made record, revealed towers 
and walls of burnt brick. Today men are still building of the same ma- 
terial, and they e.xpect their structures to stand as long as some of those in 
the Eastern countries stood. 

Statistics are generally considered pretty dry, but the simple statement 
that 25,000,000,000 bricks are made annually in the United States can he 
appreciated and remembered. The full meaning of this enormous number 
is brought home when it is considered that it is but a single factor in a vast 
accumulation ; that it is added to what we already had ; that it increases by 
that much the country's wealth of brick, for few are destroyed, and every 
year adds 25,000,000,000 more. That is enough to lay a five-foot sidewalk 
eight times around the world. The enormous output is not ahead of de- 
mand, and this ought to be proof that the brick that came sixty centuries 
ago, came to stay. 

It is worthy of thought that the first important building material in- 
vented by man was the most durable thing he ever invented. Some minor 
improvements may have been made since, but in the main essentials the 
bricks in the Tower of Babel were as good as those of today. Man reached 
the limit of possibilities in brick-making — at least in durable qualities — 
earlier than any history records. He did the same with the bow and arrow, 
for there was absolutely no improvement in the bow, as far as known, from 
the days when the archer "drew a bow at a venture" and pierced the armor 
of Ahab, at Ramoth-Gilead, down to the battle of Crec}'. Five thousand 
years after the bow reached perfection it was laid aside for something bet- 
ter; but not so with brick. 

It is a matter of interest, though purely an academic question, how men 
learned to burn brick. It was probably learned accidentally and experi- 
mentally. A brick is no more and no less than an artificial stone, in the 
making of which great heat has played a part. It is a common thing in 
nature, and doubtless the earl)' brick makers took hints from lava flows. 
Some lavas are so much like some kinds of brick that a broken piece of one 
could scarcely be distinguished from a fragment of the other. For in- 
stance, the bufT-colored feldspathic lava from j\lt. Shasta in California 
looks, when freshl}' broken, like a piece of bufif brick ; while the hard, 
metallic, basaltic lava, so common in some parts of New Mexico, is the pic- 
ture of the hard, vitrified brick with glassy surfaces. There can be little 
question, though direct proof is not at hand, that the Babylonian brick- 
makers who worked wonders in Sargon's kilns at Akkad, 3,800 years B. C, 
were putting into practice lessons learned in the volcanic regions of the 
Northern plateaus. 

Be that as it may, all historical and archaeological evidence points to the 
valley of the Euphrates river as the region in which the art of brick making 
was developed and it had reached practical perfection nearly or quite 6,000 
years ago, as is evidenced by the remains buried in mounds of that 
cradle of civilization. This refers to burned brick, not to sundried 
cakes of mud. No one knows when these were first made, and the 



102 



The Architect and Engineer 




MALABAR SCHOOL --END DETAIL 
SHOWING EFFECTIVE BRICKWORK 
WITHEY & DAVIS. INC.. ARCHITECTS 



The Architect and Engineer 103 

<|uestiun is of little practical importance, thout;h it niiyht he interesting^-. 
Bricks dried by the sun and left unburnt are of little im])ortance in this 
country. Doubtless such were made long before the art of burning bricks 
was discovered. 

When modern excavators began to dig into the vast mound which is 
believed to mark the site of the Tower of Babel, they soon came to layers 
and heaps of bricks which had passed through heat so great as to vitrify the 
surface. Theologians were the first to suggest a cause for it. They saw in 
the hard, glassy bricks many pieces of evidence to substantiate the biblical 
story of the confusion of language and the destruction of divine wrath of 
the monument erected by sinful man to escape another flood. It was 
pointed out by biblical scholars that the glassy surfaces of the bricks must 
have been due to repeated and terrific strokes of lightning — therefore, the 
Tower of Babel must have been destroyed by lightning as a punishment for 
wickedness and a warning to ambitious man not to attempt to reach for- 
bidden heights. 

Scientists took the same facts and placed quite a difi^erent interpretation 
on them. Instead of a bombardment of lightning sufficiently fierce to half 
melt the surfaces of the bricks — a thing absolutely impossible under the 
laws and phenomena of nature — a reasonable and simple exjjlanation was 
found. The vitrified bricks had been regularly and properly burned in kilns 
before they were built into the massive foundations of the Tower of Babel. 
The builders knew enough of masonry and architecture to understand that 
the best and strongest material must go in the foundation in order to sup- 
port the great weight above, and there was where they placed the best- 
burned bricks, and there is where excavators find them after thousands of 
years. The tower was said to have been 600 feet high, but that figure is 
doubtful. There is no doubt, however, that the hard bricks excavated were 
capable of sustaining the enormous weight of such a superstructure. 

That is going back a long time, but the information is worth the journey. 
It throws light on a good many phases of life on economic conditions in 
that remote period. Modern man is prone to consider himself everything 
and the ancient man as a barbarian dressed in goatskins, fighting with sharp 
sticks for spears, living in tents, and subsisting on his flocks, or the chase, 
with a little assistance from crude agriculture. Excavations of the Chal- 
dean mounds show a different state of affairs. The ability' to burn bricks 
capable of standing the elements 3,000 or 6,000 years is proof of a civiliza- 
tion of high order ; because the presence of skilled brick makers implied the 
presence of competent mechanics of other kinds — architects, smiths, lum- 
bermen, irrigationists and merchants to carry on the trade of an empire. No 
great industry stands alone. It cannot do it. Unfortunately, time, war and 
decay have blotted out almost everj'thing pertaining to that ancient civili- 
zation — except the most indestructible part of it, the brick. In later times 
kings stamped their names and engraved their laws on bricks, but the most 
ancient are plain. Yet those most ancient blocks of burnt clay tell a story 
filled with human interest. 

Take, for example, the matter of burning the millions of bricks which 
the Babylonians used. Where did the wood come from for firing the kilns? 
It is a forestless region now with only a few ragged fringes of brush along 
the nearly dry, meandering water courses ; and there is reason to belie\'e 
that it was practically in the same condition 27 centuries ago, when the 
only mention of trees was a fringe of willows along the rivers where the 
captive Hebrews hung their harps on the willows by the rivers of Babylon 
and wept. Our "weeping willow" came from there. But 2,000 years before 



10+ The Architect and Engineer 

chat time the brick-kihis were filling the Euphrates valley with their smoke, 
and doubtless wood was then plentiful. 

\\hen Xebuchadnezzar, as it is recorded of him, looked about him and ex- 
claimed with exultation and pride, "Is not this great Babylon which I have 
builded?" He was looking upon a vast brick-built city. He was himself 
one of the world's greatest brick makers. It was doubtless necessarj' even 
in the comparatively early time in which he lived to raft wood down the 
Euphrates and Tigris rivers from the highlands of Ararat and the Anti- 
taurus mountains to supply his brick burners : but the wood was forthcom- 
ing and the brickkilns turned our their products by millions. Xebuchad- 
nezzar was not only a mighty brickmaker, but he was also one of the most 
elaborate advertisers the world has seen. His name was stamped on every 
brick that came from his kilns. 

"Xebuchadnezzar's furnace" has become a proverb. It is a term used to 
convey the idea of intense heat. The specific use to which he put it on one 
occasion made it famous : for there he ordered the three rebellious Hebrews, 
I\Ieshach, Shedrach, and Abednego, to be burned alive, according to the 
biblical narrative. As a preparation for the proposed cremation he ordered 
the furnace to be heated "seven times hotter." 

^\"hat was Xebuchadnezzar doing with a furnace? This is a fair, prac- 
tical question. It does not appear that he maintained a furnace for the 
special purpose of burning unfortunate prisoners ; on the contrary, the 
reading of the narrative shows that he acted on the impulse of the moment 
when he ordered the prisoners burned, and not deliberately (though tricked 
into it I as when he ordered Daniel thrown into the lions" den. The plain 
facts probably were — as far as the narrative is a statement of facts — that 
the famous furnace was simply a brick-kiln. That, at least, is a reasonable 
interpretation of it. Doubtless the brickyards w^ere in the suburbs of the 
city, and the great interest which the king took in brickmaking would 
cause him to think of a burning kiln the first thing when he wanted to 
inflict prompt and terrible punishment. 

How hot were Xebuchadnezzar's brick-kilns? That is not a foolish 
question or one wholly incapable of being answered, though it might seem 
so at first thought. There were, of course, no thermometers then for meas- 
uring temperature, but the condition of the bricks themselves is a record 
of the fierceness of the fire through which they passed. Heat produced the 
same effect on clay then as it does now ; and comparing some of the hardest 
burned of Xebuchadnezzar's bricks with the product of modern kilns where 
the degree of heat is known, it is found that some of his kilns were heated 
from 1,800 to 2,200 degrees Fahr. It is difificult to attain much greater heat 
than that when wood is the fuel, and it is evident that his brickmakers un- 
derstood how to build kilns which developed the largest amount of heat 
from the fuel in use. 

It has not been necessary to burn brick on a large scale in the Euphrates 
and Tigris valleys during the past 2,000 years. In the first place there has 
been little fuel available for that purpose ; in the second place, the region 
has sunk so low in civilization and has been so greatly devastated by wars 
that the inhabitants have been discouraged from erecting large buildings. 
But those who have put up houses have simply dug the necessary bricks 
out of mounds wdiich mark the sites where ancient cities stood. This has 
been going on for 2.000 years and plenty remains. The bricks now in the 
walls of a poor Arab's hut were once part of a palace. Time, war. flood and 
fire have leveled the ancient edifices, but the bricks remain, and many of 
them are as serviceable today as they were when first laid up in masonry 
a thousand years before Abraham crossed the Euphrates on his journey 
westward to the land of Canaan. — Rock Products. 



The Arcliitcct and Engineer 105 

The High Cost of Incompetence 



Are present-day methods of arehiteelurc and eonslruetion all wrong.' Mr. S. 
Kruse, a Minneapolis builder and ozeuer, contends they are, in a forceful article in 
the Xovember Real Estate Magacine. Kruse puts things in black and ivhite and lie 
calls a spade a spade. He oz'erdran'S things a bit. but the real competent architect 
zeill recognize tlutt Mr. Kruse kiioii.'S his subject and is hitting the nail squarely on 
the head. 

While we do not approz'e of his plan to totally eliminate the architect as a direct 
employee of the oiener and engage, instead, a competent and financially responsible 
construction firm which has in its employ qualified designers and engineers, we do 
feel that a rigid license taw should preivil in cecry State, making the requirements 
for admission most stringent, and thereby ridding the architectural profession of in- 
competents. 

As a prelude to Mr. Kruse's paper. Mr. F. IF. Fitcpatrick, consulting architect 
of Washington, Iws zcritten for this magazine an interesting commentary under the 
Caption. "1 he O'a'ner's Point of I'ieze." — Editor. 



By F. \V. FITZPATRICK 

THE average architect really believes that his most important function 
is fulfilled when once he has designed a beautiful, much be-columned 
and highly ornamental exterior for a building. He stands ready to 
sacrifice almost any advantages of plan or economy of construction to that 
'"front." Indeed, his whole education and training has been "frontward." 
so one can't wonder much at that most natural and highly cultivated bent. 

But it has done him harm and may yet be the Waterloo of the profes- 
sion, ^len who pay for buildings have grown to want more than monu- 
ments to their architects' artistic and decorative ability, they want profit, 
they want every penny spent where it will do the most good ; they want 
service, in other words, and are realizing that they are not getting it in the 
highest degree from their architects. 

I have been preaching for years the gospel of greater service, more 
thoroughness on the part of the architects, exhorting them to set aside their 
wonted disdain of the merely practical details of planning and building, but 
the architects have pooh-poohed it all, thought I was just scolding, or 
sermonizing, or bidding for more business as a consulting or advisory asso- 
ciate. They rather fatuously believed they were giving all that could be 
expected of them in the regular, accustomed, usual manner sanctioned by 
long precedent, for were they not doing just as had been done by architects 
for years and j'ears? 

But that is exactly what the people don't want. Things have progressed, 
more is expected of everyone ; he who lags behind is liable to be lost, for- 
gotten and new ways are constantly being devised for doing what he may 
have so well done years ago. That is what is happening in architecture, the 
writing I've seen upon the wall, the construction of buildings by construc- 
tion companies direct, with architects as mere subordinates, not as directors 
and representatives of the owners. 

Hundreds of owners have felt they were not getting their money's worth 
through the architects, some have sued the latter for mistakes and losses 
but, so far, the courts have assumed that architects act as agents for the 
owner, therefore the latter were responsible for such errors and couldn't 
recover. A broader and more equitable view of the law is the order of the 
day and owners are beginning to know just where the trouble lies and are 
seeking redress for it or a preventive. 

Mr. Kruse, the owner and builder of a large hotel in Minneapolis, the 
Radisson, himself a lawyer, has written a most severe arraignment of the 



106 Tlic Architect and Iiui^iinw 

rircliitects, excerpts of which are given in the succeeding pages. It voices 
the sentiments of probably eight out of ten people who build. Unwise, 
indeed, will it be for the architects to dodge it or loftily ignore it. Better 
far for them to read it with the greatest attention, digest it most thoroughly 
and then sincerely and earnestly set to work to render such service, if it is 
))ossible, as will impel the owners to continue things as they are now, rather 
than resorting to the expedients (found right at hand) Mr. Kruse describes 
find recommends, and that if adopted spells nothing more nor less than the 
extinction of architecture as an independent profession. 



The High Cost of Incompetence 

By S. KRUSE, Builder and Owner, Hotel Radisson, Minneapolis 

NEXT in importance to the science of building operation and manage- 
ment, is the science of building architecture and engineering. Sooner 
or later, every building operator will be interested either as designer 
or builder. It is of the utmost importance that, before becoming involved, 
lie have an accurate conception of the real status, function and legal lia- 
liility of the architect. 

The courts define the relation between owner and architect as that of 
principal and agent. Out of this fundamental principle grew the doctrine 
that the architect as the agent of the owner is purely advisory. In theory 
he is supposed to be directed by the owner as to the desig'n and construc- 
tion ; in fact, as to all details of the proposed building. The architect, as 
the agent, was supposed to take these instructions and develop them into 
tine harmonious whole and was, theoretically, supposed to deal directly 
with the contractor for the purpose of giving to the owner the building, 
including material, that the owner had determined on. 

As a corollary to the doctrine of agency, grew the principle that the 
architect is not responsible for errors in judgment, or errors in employment 
(if contractor or sub-contractor, or errors in the selection of material, or 
errors in the superintendence, providing he exercise such care and skill as 
was customarily exercised by members of his profession. From these two 
fundamental rules our entire system of juris]irudence pertaining to relative 
rights of owner and architect have grown. 

Rule Prejudicial to Owner 
The relation between owner and architect as one of principal and agent 
operates very satisfactorily so long as building construction is simple in its 
nature. The difficulty with this principle and the injustice of it to the 
owner becomes apparent when building construction becomes complex and 
\vhen the sciences of sanitation, ventilation, heating and plumbing, elec- 
tricity and transportation are incorj)orated in the construction of our mam- 
moth buildings. It was formerly, and to a large extent is now, the practice 
to entrust to the architect, the employment of the necessary engineers and 
specialists. It becomes apparent, that where the architect is entrusted with 
the employment of these specialists that either through ignorance, incom- 
(jetency or dishonesty qn the part of any of the specialists employed, the 
owner may be the heavy loser. This follows for the reason that under the 
doctrine of agency the mistake of the architects is the mistake of the owner 
and the consequent loss must be borne by the owner. It also becomes 
apparent, in order to avoid the responsibility for loss, there is ony one 
recourse for the owner, viz., to make the selection personally. This is not 
practical, as the owner is not competent to determine the qualifications of 
any so-called expert to perform the necessary service. The result under 



The Architect and Engineer 107 

this system is that in a large building project, under the doctrine of agency, 
the owner places himself wholly into the hands of his architect and is 
wholly at his mercy. 

We can readih* imagine the predicament of the owner who falls into the 
hands of an unscrupulous or ignorant architect, and in this respect there 
is no practical difference between ignorance and dishonesty, as the results 
are the same. The reader will further realize the precarious situation of the 
owner, w^hen we consider that practically eight out of ten so-called archi- 
tects are wholly incompetent and unfit to undertake large building con- 
struction and determine the various problems incident thereto. The archi- 
tect as a specialist is practically on a par with the other professional men. 
It is a well known fact that the average American professional man is unfit 
and incompetent to assume the serious responsibilities of his profession. 
This is so by reason of insufficient education and by reason of lack of in- 
tellectual interest in his profession. It is a fact that the interest of the 
average professional man is purely commercial and his principal thought 
is how many dollars he can derive therefrom with the least labor. 

In American communities, the commercial spirit will always rule. It is 
not a question of honor, or integrity, but solely a question of realizing as 
much money as possible on the smallest investment, either of time or 
money. The man who can secure the largest profit on a given investment 
is looked upon with admiration. This spirit pervades even the professions. 
It is not to be expected, therefore, that the a,rchitect will hesitate to advise 
his client to undertake a large building project, for the larger the project, 
the larger the fee. He will encourage his client to undertake a building 
project involving millions without questioning whether the project is prac- 
tical and without questioning whether the client will lose or gain. These 
questions, the architect reasons, are for the client to determine, and in the 
event the project is a failure, it is, of course, chargeable to the client's folly. 
Such is the reasoning of the architect. In reality, the relationship of the 
architect to the owner is that of trustee and beneficiary. Being imbued 
with American commercialism, he has no liking for a trust relationship 
and consequently disregards it and takes advantage of his position for his 
pecuniary gain. 

Says Average Architect is Incompetent 
•■\nother reason for abandoning the rule is the fact that the average 
architect is incompetent for larger work. The architectural student spends 
three or four years at school and is then graduated. Having no interest 
in his profession except a commercial interest, he does not pursue his 
studies after graduation. The result is that when he is employed on large 
construction he is wholly unfit to render efficient service. He, not know- 
ing the requirements of modern lousiness, is not capable to select experts. 
Xot knowing the subject himself he cannot judge the qualifications of 
another. It is not improbable, therefore, that when he employs expert 
service he will, in his ignorance, select men who are as incompetent as he. 

A common practice in an architect's office is to call into consultation 
the representatives of firms dealing in specialties. The writer has observed 
the draftsmen of an ornamental iron company preparing plans and specifica- 
tions for the architect of the iron work ; representatives of the marble com- 
l)any submitting plans of the marble installation ; representatives of electric 
firm drawing plans of the electric work. In return for service in preparing 
such plans, the architect urges his client to let the contract to the firm 
that prepared the plans and specifications. The reason is apparent — the 
architect does not know how to prepare the plans and specifications or is 



108 The .Irchitcct and Engineer 

too indolent to do so. In case the owner refuses to comply with the archi- 
tect's directions there is trouble. These are facts that are within the knowl- 
edge of the writer and of most every salesman and builder. 

The writer has been assured that in many offices the successful con- 
tractor "must pay the architect a percentage in order to keep him good 
natured and to secure an O. K. on the work promptly." 

The plans and specifications of the average architect covering a hotel 
or office building project are usually so imperfect and impractical as to be 
worthless. If adopted as a basis for contract, it gives to the contractor 
every opportunity to claim extras for he is not obliged to do any work not 
specified in the plans and specifications. This is frequently the reason why 
the owner must pay many thousands of dollars as extras, in order to secure 
a practical and finished building. In the opinion of the writer, if the owner 
wants practical and complete plans and specifications "he had better pre- 
pare them and then submit them to his architect to draw them to scale." 

If the owner cannot do this, then he had better not build. Witness the 
tragic story of many of our large hotel and office building projects: trace 
the project from its inception as a promotion scheme of which the architect 
was the leading spirit, through the many stages of construction, resulting 
ultimately in foreclosure of the bonded indebtedness, and the owner in- 
volved in financial ruin. Observe again the number who have lost the 
savings of a life time in enterprises of this character, and still others, who 
because of these conditions, have sought relief in suicide. The writer 
knows two cases of this character traceable wholly to the ignorance and 
dishonesty of architects. 

Thinks Architects' Charges Excessive 

Another reason for abandoning the rule is the fact that the basis of 
charge for architectural service as determined by the American Institute of 
Architects, is excessive. The usual basis of charge for plans and specifica- 
tions, with superintendence, is six per cent of the aggregate construction 
cost. 

The time spent on a one million dollar building does not exceed two 
months for preparation of plans and specifications and about ten months in 
superintendence of the building construction, yet his fee is $60,000. Four- 
fifths of the work is done by subordinates, usually drawing salaries of from 
SI 5 to $25 per week. It will be observed that the architect demands his 
percentage not only on the cost of the building construction, but also on the 
cost of the entire mechanical equipment, electrical installation, ventilation 
installation, and. in fact, on all items pertaining to the cost of the building. 
He will demand this "even though he was not employed or concerned in the 
mechanical installation," and even though the owner employed and paid 
the engineers therefor. The writer is informed of five specific instances 
where the architects took this attitude solely on the theory that the me- 
chanical equipment w'as part of the building cost and. therefore, under the 
form of contract as drawn by the American Institute of Architects they 
were entitled to six per cent compensation. 

The fourth reason for abandoning the rule is the fact that the average 
architect is not practical in specialty building or design. The owner as- 
sumes that his architect is informed of the requirements of modern business 
building and will incorporate these requirements into his plans and specifi- 
cations. Relying on this assumption, the owner does not carefully inform 
himself, or employ an experienced and expert manager to revise the archi- 
tect's plans. The result is that w'hen the plans and specifications are sub- 
mitted and adopted they are in many details wholly impractical, and the 



The Architect and Eiii^inccr 109 

building constructed ])ursuant tlicreto is a financial failure. Modern busi- 
ness in most all lines is very complex, and each business usually involves 
man}- specialties. The ability to prepare practical plans and specifications 
in any of the departments of any given business requires a specialist who 
has become so by reason of years of training and study. The average archi- 
tect is not a student, he is usually only a draftsman. 

The writer eni])l(jyed, on a hotel project, a firm of architects reputed to 
be the best in the Northwest, who had upwards of forty years of building 
experience, and, l>y reason thereof, had the absolute confidence of the 
owner. These gentlemen, no doubt, did the best they could, and yet the 
following were some of the items of their work : 

Embedded steam pipes in concrete floor slal)s with the rcsuU tliat the expansion and 
contraction of the pipes in the slali caused the pipes to break and to leak through the 
slab. 

Embedded service pipes in tlie wall in such manner that when a leaks occurs, or 
repairs are necessary, it is necessary to tear away the w;ill in order to gain access ta 
the pipes. 

In a twelve-story hotel project, omitted plumbing shafts. 

Installed duplicate soil and supply pipes where one set would serve the purpose. 

Selected bath tubs of such size and built the entrance doors to bath rooms so small 
that when the tubs arrived, it was found that they were too large for the entrance doors, 
and holes had to be cut into the bath room walls before installation of tubs could be 
made. 

Gave the building windows of four different sizes, thereby making it necessary to 
purchase curtains and window shades of that number of separate and distinct sizes. 

Dead arms approximately twenty feet in length on hot water service lines. 

Refused to submit any plans of electric fixture installation, plumbing plans, ventila- 
tion system, kitchen installation, ofiice design, furniture layout, on the pretext that that 
is no part of the architect's contract who has undertaken to prepare complete plans and 
specifications of a hotel project. 

These gentlemen represented that the completed hotel of 250 rooms would cost not 
to exceed 25 cents per cubic foot, when in reality after correcting the architect's blun- 
ders, it cost much more. 

It is apparent that a legal proceeding against an architect is a fruit- 
less task. It reminds one of the story of Frederick the Great, who one day 
undertook to punish the Polish King. The King returned after the comple- 
tion of a militar\- campaign empty handed, with nothing except the fruitless 
glory of victory. \\'hen asked what success he had achieved, he said he 
was in the position of the devil who went wool gathering, but found noth- 
ing except wild hogs, and he undertook to gather wool from them. \\'hen 
asked as to the result of his attempt, he said, "Great cry, but little wool." 
So is the attempt to collect damages from the average architect. 
Suggestions as to Remedy 

The writer has frequently discussed the situation above outlined and 
has come to the conclusion there are two remedies. To those who are of 
the opinion that it will serve their interests best to entrust same wholly to 
an architect, the contract relation between them should be reduced to 
writing, and somewhat along the following lines : 

After informing the architect of the sum the owner desires to spend, the parties 
should agree : First, the architect to prepare preliminary sketches and for which there is 
to be no charge. .-Vfter submission of tlie sketch, the owner to have the right to proceed 
or not to proceed and in either event, is not to l>e liable to the architect for any purpose. 

In the event the owner, after receipt of preliminary plans and specifications, decide to 
specifications. On submission of the same, the owner to be liable for one per cent of the 
contraction of the pipes in the slab caused the pipes to break and to leak through tlie 
construction and in the event he does not proceed, then his liability to be limited to the 
one per cent of the estimated cost. 

In the event the owner, after receipt of preliminary plans and specifications, decide to 
proceed with construction, then the architect is to prepare detailed plans and specifica- 
tions covering the entire construction phase of the building and in a manner satisfactory 



110 Tlic Arcliitcct and Engineer 

tQ the owner. On receipt of same, bids are to l)e secured thereon. In the event the 
lowest responsible bid exceed the construction cost as limited, then the owner is not to 
be liable to the architect for any further compensation. If the lowest responsible bid do 
not exceed the construction cost as limited, then for plans and specifications, the owner 
is to pay the architect two per cent on the actual cost. The owner, however, has again 
the option to proceed or not to proceed with the construction, and in the event he decide 
not to proceed, then he is indebted to the architect not to exceed two per cent on cost 
as appears from the lowest bid. 

On acceptance of the detailed plans, and the receipt of the lowest bid, the question 
of superintendence arises. The owner has the option to employ the architect, or to em- 
ploy an independent inspector. In the event he select the architect's superintendence, 
then he is to pay him therefor on a basis of two per cent of the actual cost of the building 
with the proviso, however, that he may discontinue the architect's service on any day the 
owner so desires and on so doing the architect's compensation for service for superin- 
tendence to be computed on a pro rata basis. 

The advantage of a contract along this outline is that the owner at all 
times is absolute master of the situation. He \vill avoid the danger of 
placing himself at the mercy of the architect, and in the event that he does 
not proceed with the building, will avoid controversy over fees. Also, 
under an arrangement of this character he will secure far better service for 
the reason that the architect, being aware that his service may be discon- 
tinued at any moment, will be more anxious to please, and less arbitrary. 
It is the e.xperience of the writer that in the employment of men it is policy 
not to enter into any arrangement that will in anywise interfere with the 
owner removing an employee at will. 

The construction contract should be given to one person or firm for all 
the construction work. By this method the owner avoids the annoyance of 
wrangling among the various sub-contractors and their employees, and he 
avoids the claim so frequently made by a contractor that the defective work 
of which he is accused, or the delay for which he has been called to account, 
is due to the negligence of another contractor, or his employees. It also 
avoids the argument so frequently made by the architect when he is 
charged with negligence, or incompetency, that the situation is due to the 
negligence or incompetency of some certain contractor or his men and was 
in no wise chargeable against the architect. By letting to one person a con- 
tract for all the work, that person is forced to assume all the difficulties 
and tribulations to which the owner is exposed when he lets contracts to 
numerous sub-contractors. It is noteworthy that a great number of the 
larger building constructions today are undertaken on this plan, and the 
writer has not learned of a single instance where its results were in any- 
wise unsatisfacto^3^ 

Objections Considered 

The architect will reply hereto by saying that his self-interest will impel 
him to give his client the best of service. Theoretically, the answer appears 
plausible. In practice, however, the argument is not applicable. The aver- 
age architect, as the average lawyer, or doctor, will take any case that is 
submitted to him, regardless whether he be competent or otherwise. The 
liumati being is so conceited as to consider himself competent to undertake 
any case pertaining to his profession. Once having secured his commission 
he will render such service as he may be able and then claim that he has 
complied with his contract and, therefore, entitled to the compensation. 

Another objection is that even though the owner should enter into a 
contract along the lines above indicated yet it will be economy for him to 
employ a competent architect. The architect claims he is more familiar 
with construction and its economies and, therefore, can save for the owner 
an amount of money exceeding the architect's commission. This argument 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 111 

also appears plausible, but is fallacious in so far as it assumes that the archi- 
tect knows the economies of construction. The fact is that the average 
architect does not know the economies in construction and has but little 
knowledge of construction cost. When sued for damages on the ground 
that he misrepresented as to cost, his answer is that in his professional 
capacity he is not supposed to advise as to cost ; that that is not one of the 
professional duties of the architect, and that the owner has no right to rely 
on any opinion the architect may express as to cost. 
Lost Entire Investment 

The importance of this subject is emphasized by the experience of Mr. 
Collins of the Dyckman Hotel. He was a hotel operator of many years' 
experience, and interested in promoting a hotel project on certain lines. As 
was reported from the testimony his architects represented the total construc- 
tion cost would not exceed $400,000. Thereupon he entered into a lease 
with the owner of the ground, whereby the owner agreed to erect a build- 
ing pursuant to those plans on a rental basis of 5 per cent per annum on 
the value of the ground, 8 per cent per annum on the cost of the building, 
and 9 per cent per annum on the cost of plumbing, steam and special in- 
stallation, together with taxes, assessments and insurance. The building 
was constructed and. as is reported, the ultimate cost thereof aggregated 
$600,000. As a result of three years" operation of the hotel, Mr. Collins was 
obliged to discontinue, being in arrears in rent for approximately two years 
and in bills and accounts payable in a very large sum. One of the reasons 
for his failure was the fact that because of the increased construction cost, 
over and above the limit placed by his architects, his rental was increased 
to such an extent that he could not successfully operate the house. 

Mr. Collins, so it is reported, lost his entire investment. His claim 
against the architects is without value, for the reason that the opinion as to 
cost, legally speaking, is an expression of opinion outside of their profes- 
sional duties, is not binding on them and is not a ground for claim for 
damages. 

Investigation of this subject leads one forcibly to the conclusion that 
there should be either a change in the antiquated methods heretofore em- 
l>loyed or stringent legislation, making the architectural profession a 
licensed profession, making the requirement for admission stringent, and 
making him legally responsible for misleading estimates and opinions and 
fixing his compensation on the reasonable basis, say, 3 per cent of the esti- 
mated cost. 

Architectural League Exhibition 

The thirteenth annual exhibition of the Architectural League of Xew York 
will be held in the building of the American Fine Arts Society, 215 West Fifty- 
seventh street, Xew York commencing Sundaj'. February 7, and continuing 
until Saturday, February 17. inclusive. The annual dinner is scheduled for Friday 
evening, Febmary 5, and the league reception for the following afternoon. 
The exhibition is illustrative of the architecture and allied fine arts. It will 
consist of drawing and models of proposed or executed work in structural, 
decorative and landscape architecture : sketches and finished models and monu- 
mental sculpture. Cass Gilbert is chairman of the committee of the annual 
exhibition and jury of selection. The jury of architecture is composed of 
Richard M. Hunt, Edwin H. Blashfield, Cass Gilbert. Isdore Konti, Donn 
Barber, William M. Kendall. Charles A. Piatt, Philip Sawyer and S. B. T. 
Trowbridge. There will be competitions for the Henry O. .\very prize and 
a special prize of $300. 



112 



The Architect and Engineer 



Arrijitprt anb lEnginppr 

OF CALIFORINIA 

Published Monthly in the interests of the 
Architects, Structural Engineers, Contract- 
ors and the Allied Trades of the Pacific 
Coast by the Architect and Engineer Co. 



Business Office and Editorial Rooms 

617-619 Monadnock Building, San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 1828 



J Canada 50c addil 



IIPTION 

le United States |1.50 

: to all Foreign points 



January, 1915 



SintctjtraL Steel 



' Brick. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Wm. B. Gester, -I luspectton 

LOREN E. Hunt. C. E. -1 and Tests 

O. P. Shelley. C. E. ( r. j. r ^ , 

F W FlTZPATRlCK \i''"t"'"OI ^<»'^t'''"i'0''- 

W. W. Breite, C. E. 
Athol McBean 
W. E. Dennison 
How.ARD Frost, i 
G. B. AsHCROFT. c. E 

H. M. LoWENTHAL 

J. K. D. Mackenzie - 

Fred M. Woods. Jr.. 

Wilbur David Cook, LandscapeArchiiectt, 

T, C. KiERULFF - ■ ■ Legal Points 

Paul C. Butte - Electrical Construction 

Louis F. Mauer - - Waterproofing 



ARCHITECTURAL 



Artificial Stone 

c Roofs and Roofing 

Rock and Gravel 



Fred H. Meyer 
August G, Headman 
Edward T. Foulkes 
Alfred F, Rosenheim 
G. Albert Lansbursh 
Houghton Sawyer 
Herman Barth 
Arthur Brown. Jr. 
Chas. P. Weeks 
Octavius Morj-an 
J. C. Austin 
Jas. W. Plachek 
W. H.Ratclitf. Jr. 



William O. Raiguel 
F. U. Hudson 
Sumner P. Hunt 
Norman F. Marsh 
Smith O'Brien 
Alnnric Coxhead 
Harrison Albright 
John Parkinson 
A. W, Smith 
T. Patterson Ross 
William H. Weeks 
Chas. W Dickey 
Henry C. Smith 



CONTRIBUTORS 



Ernest Coxhead 
Wm. C. Haves 
Chas. Henry Cheney 
Herbert E. Law 
Hon. Jas. D. Phelan 
John Galen Howard 
Louis C. Mullgardt 



John Bakcwell.Jr. 
W. Garden Mitchell 
Nathaniel Blaisdell 
W. R. B. Wilcox 
William Mooser 
Robert Morgeneier 
B. J. S. Cahill 
F. A. I. A. 



E. M. C. Whitney 
.\. I. Whitney 
Frederick W. Jones 



Manager 
Treasurer 

Managing Editor 



Xext month The Architect and En- 
gineer of Cahfornia will publish an 
interesting article 
DEVELOPMENT on "The Develop- 

OF THE MOVING ment of the Mov- 
PICTURE THEATER i n g Picture The- 
ater," showing 
some of the latest examples of motion 
picture houses in Pacific Coast cities. 
It is gratifying to note that archi- 
tects are now given an opportunity to 
design something better than a "corru- 
gated iron shack" which marked the 
initiatory stages of the "movey" craze. 
Referring to the hap-hazard construc- 
tion that has characterized the mov- 
ing picture theater in the past, the 
Builders' Guide of Philadelphia com- 
ments : 

There is no doubt in the mind of any 
sane observer that the building of "movie" 
theaters, — so far as Philadelphia is con- 
cerned, — has been overdone. Nor is there 
an.v doubt at all that inost of the buildings 
dedicated to this form of amusement have 
been underdone. When it is considered 
what really beautiful and artistic effects 
are possible with the use of architectural 
terra cotta in this field of design, one is 
moved to marvel at many of the garish, 
flimsy and hopelessly ugly affairs thrown 
up as "palaces of photoplay entertainment.' 
The bulk of these are in ornamental sheet 
iron, a medium that while useful to a cer- 
tain extent has somewhat sharply defined 
limitations. One of the chief objections to 
corrugated iron is that it deceives no one^ 
not even the builder. Coat it as you may, 
plaster it with gold leaf, embellish it with 
lights, it remains under any and all circum- 
stances frankly and even obtrusively — orna- 
mental iron. This is not true of archi- 
tectural terra cotta. Terra cotta has the 
"feel." the sense of solidity, the grace of 
outline of stone. It has an air of elegance, 
a wholesome genuineness about it that ap- 
peals. It is wholly free from that sugges- 
tion of the "shoddy" and the "gingerbread" 
that makes itself felt in the structure of 
sheet iron. A diminution in the number of 
the "movies" with a corresponding better- 
niient in the quality of the building seems to 
be at this time more or less inevitable. We 
note, too, that the shoddy structures which 
marked the initiatory stages of the "movej'" 
craze are gradually being abandoned or 
handed over for remodeling for other lines. 
The moral is that spurious building doesn't 
pay, and that an attractive structure de- 
signed by a competent architect and made 
of approved materials is as necessary to 
success as first-run picture features or ex- 
tensive advertising. 



The Architect and Engineer 



113 



W'riting about the lack of color in 
modern architecture. Mr. Charles de 
Kav, the noted art 
COLOR IN MODERN critic of New York. 
ARCHITECTURE alludes to the bas- 

relief in enameled 
tiles at the exhibition of the Architec- 
tural League in Xew York, as fol- 
lows : 

Notwithstanding all that has been done in 
the way of tiles to decorate the interior 
and exterior, the fact remains that our 
architects are not taking the advantage they 
might of this material to enrich the town- 
scape and -provide sumptuous and lasting 
color schemes for churches and capitols, 
hotels, libraries and railway stations, pub- 
lic and private houses. 

The color notes from smooth or dull or 
unevenly surfaced products of the kiln 
have been so far mild enough, discreet 
enough, well enough suited to the timidity 
one meets when the question of color comes 
up. Even these anemic hues are often set 
aside for drab or dead w-hite walls unre- 
lieved by anything save windows in monot- 
onous rows whose deadly iteration numbs 
the mind and steeps the soul in gloom. By 
the d'cft introduction of tiles in smooth or 
dull glazes much might be done to render 
tall buildings less repellant and to some 
degree disguise the enforced but ghastly 
regularity of their fenestration. 

Tiling can be varied in tint to prevent 
a too solid color ; it can be modelled in 
relief to obtain elifects of shade. Chance 
alterations in tone, or "hazards" of 
the kiln allow the architect a gamut 
color vibrations on which to play the 
changes. Perhaps through this ma- 
terial we shall have presently an 
architecture better suited to our bril- 
liant atmosphere, our autumn wood- 
lands, than the doleful kind we inherit 
from Europe. In the hands of archi- 
tects who have some feeling for color 
we should have rich and varied deco- 
rations for schoolhouse and city hall, 
hospital and public library, clubhouse 
and theater, market and nniseum. We 
should demand to be at least as fa- 
vored in this way as were the men of 
the middle ages and the ancients of 
Greece. Assyria and Egypt when they 
built their temples and palaces. 



Jr.; directors, A. M. Loevventhal, Thomas 
Bendell and T. M. Priueggor. 



Architects Elect Officers 

At the annual meeting of San Fran- 
cisco Architectural Club, January 7th, the 
following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent Albert L. Lapachet; vice-president, 
Charles Peter Weeks: secretary, A. R. 
Williams; treasurer, William J. Helm, 



A Pleasant Compliment for Mr. Cahill 
Improved Sanitary Fi.xture Co. 
411 S. Los Angeles St.. 
Los Angeles. 
Mr. F. W. Jones, Editor Architect and Engineer, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Dear Sir:— May I say that I deem Mr. Cahill's 
article in your December issue a brilliant literary 
masterpiece — the best I ever read on an architec 
tural topic. It is comprehensive, incisive, instruc- 
tive, interesting and inspiring. 
Yours sincerely, 

George Huntington Barker. 



Engineers to Have New Quarters 

The San Francisco Society of Engi- 
neers has practically decided to move 
to the top floor of tlie Shreve building. 
Architect C. E. Gottschalk has prepared 
preliminary plans calling for an expendi- 
ture of about $10,000 in tilting up the 
entire floor for the use of the Society. 
If it is decided to go ahead with the 
proposition the Society will endeavor to 
materially strengthen its membership. 



Architect Gottschalk Busy- 
Architect C. E. Gottsclialk, who suc- 
ceeded to the business in San Francisco 
of the late William Curlett, is unusually 
busy, new work on hand including a 
$25,000 Class C commercial garage for 
the Terminal Hotel interests, a $15,000 
frame apartment house on Filbert street 
for Charles Farrell, a $70,000 Class C 
hotel and a number of smaller jobs. 



Close Figuring 

The sharp competition on recent con- 
struction contracts has resulted in much 
close bidding. At several of the lettings 
in the last few weeks, says Engineering 
and Contracting, the figures to the right 
of the decimal point have decided the 
award of the work. On a 100.000 cubic 
yard earthwork job the other day the 
low bidder put in a bid of 23.999 cents 
per cubic j-ard. The figure of his near- 
est competitor was an even 24 cents. 
The latter contractor was an old timer, 
who never bothered with the fractional 
part of a cent in his unit price. He vras 
not exactly strong on fractions and he 
also believed in making it easy for the 
engineer to figure out the monthly esti- 
mates. On this work he had put in a 
particular!)' low proposal, and he felt 
quite confident of securing the contract. 
He was somewhat astonished, therefore, 
to find out that he had been under-bid. 
He figured it out: 100.000 cubic yards 
at 24 cents made $24,000; then he took 
his competitor's bid and, after some 
maneuvering, discovered that it totaled 
$23,999. He reflected on his problem for 
a minute and then broke out: "Well! 
Well! Well! The little divil won oiit 
by $1. That comes of having an eddi- 
cation." 



With the Architects and 
Engineers 



Amprtraii JlnBttlulr of ArrljttrrtB 

(ORGANIZED 1857) 

OFFICERS FOR 1914-15 

President R. Clipston Sturgis, Boston 

First \'ice-President. . . .Thos. R. Kimball, 

Omaha, Neb. 

Second Vice-President. D. Knickerbocker Boyd. 

Philadelphia 

Secret.\rv Burton L. Fenner, New York 

Treasurer ■ J. L. Maur\n, St. Louis 

, ( T. J D. Fuller, Washington, D. C. 

Auditors...) Robert Stead, Washington, D. C. 



Board of Directors 

For One Year— Irving K. Pond. Chicago; .John 
M. Donaldson, Detroit; Edward A. Crane, Phila- 
delphia. 

For Two Years— C. Grant La Farge, New 
York; Burt L. Fenner, New York; H. Van Buren 
Magonigle, New York. 

For Three Years— W. R. B. Willcox, Seattle, 
Wash.; Octavius Morgan, Los Angeles; Walter 
Cook. New York. 

San Francisco Chapter 

President W. B. Faville 

Vice-President Edgar A. Mathews 

StCRETABY-TREASURtK SVLVAIN SCHNAITTACHER 

_ J Henry A. Schulze 

Trustees ; j^^ w. Reid 

Southern California Chapter 

President Albert C. Martin 

Vice-President S. Tilden Norton 

Secretary Fernand Parmentier 

Treasurer August Wackerbarth 

Board of Directors 

J. E. Allison J. J. Blick 

J. J. Backus 



Portland, Ore., Chapter 

President A. E. Doyle 

Vice-President Folger Johnson 

Secretary Wm. G. Holford 

Treasurer J. A. Fouilihou.x 

Council Members ! ^"^^'^rAMORE 

Washington State Chapter 

President Tas, H. Schack, Seattle 

Vice-President '. Tos. Cote, Seattle 

Vice-President Geo. Gove, Tacoma 

\'ice-President. L. L. Rand, Spokane 

Secretary Arthur L. Loveless, Seattle 

Treasurer Andrew Willatzen, Seattle 

I D. R. Huntington 
Members of Council < W. R. B. Willcox 

' Jas. Stephen 



(Haltfontia l^tatp 2^uari uf ArtljUrrturr 

NOBTHERN DISTRICT. 

President John Bakewell, Jr. 

Secretary and Treasurer. Sylvain Schnaittacher 

Jno. Bakewell, Jr. Edgar A. Mathews 

Joseph C. Newsome 

SOUTHERN DISTRICT. 

President John P. Krempel 

Secretary-Treasurer Fred H. Roehrig 

I Octavius Morgan 

Members < Sumner P. Hunt 

I Wm. S. Hebbard 

g'an JfraKriarn Arrljitprtural (Illub 

OFFICERS FOR 19IJ.I4 

President Geo. E. Greenwood 

Vice-President Chas. Peter Weeks 

Secretary A. L. Williams 

Treasurer Wm. D. Sherman 

Directors 
Henry A. Thomsen James A. Magee 

2inB Angplra Arrl|itprtural (Club 

President Arthur Rolland Kelly 

\'ice-Peesident Harry F. Withey 

Secretary-Treasurer Henry E. Bean 

Chairman Educational Committee 

John T. Vawter 

Chairman House and Entertainment Committees, 

Mossier of Atelier 

Gilbert Stanley Underwood 

&an lipgn Arrl|ttPrtural AsBnnattan 

Pkesident J. B. Lyman 

Vice-President F. C. Cressy 

Secretary Robt. Halley, Ir. 

Treasurer G. A. Haussen 



^^nrtlanli Arrl|ttprtural Ollub 

OFFICERS FOR 1913 



Arrljttprtural SJpagup a f tl|p ParifirQInaBt 

President., Charles Peter Weeks, San Fr 

Vice-Pres....John Bakewell, Jr., San Fr 

Sec'y-Treas.. . . Aug, G. Headman, San Fr 

Next Convention City— San Francisco. 

Architects' Homes Robbed 

A number of Los Angeles architects 
are wondering why it is that the gentle- 
men who follow burglary for a profes- 
sion have singled them out for victims. 
As the burglars in each instance secured 
a sufficient reward, their good judgment 
cannot be questioned at any rate. Among 
the homes entered were those of John 
Parkinson, of Parkinson & Bergstrom, 
Lyman Farvvell and A. F. Rosenheim. 




^aniFrancisico ^ocietp 
of aircftitectsJ 

Regular Meetings Second 
Wednesday of Each Month 






John Bakewell, Jr. 

Charles Peter Weeks 

William Otis Raiguel 

John Galen Howard and Louis C. Mullgardt 



President - 
Vice-President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Directors 
Committees: — 

Membership — Wm. C. Hays, Fred'k H. Meyer, and Geo. W. Kelham. 

Architectural Practice — John Galen Howafd. Clarence R. Ward, and Houghton 

Entertainment and Program — Louis C. Mullgardt. Chas. P. Weeks, and Louis 

Allied Arts — Loring P. Rixford, J. Harry Blohme, and Warren C. Perry. 

Publicity — Wm. Otis Raiguel, John J. Donovan, and E. Coxhead. 

Education — Bernard R. Maybeck. Arthur Brown. Jr., and John Baur. 

Competitions — Chas. P. Weeks. Wm. C. Hays, and John Reid. Jr. 



December Meeting of San Francisco 
Society of Architects 

The regular mcmthly meeting of the 
San Francisco Society of Architects was 
held at the University Club, California 
and Powell streets, on the evening of 
December 9th. 

The Development of the Foot of Mar- 
ket Street, which was discussed at the 
September meeting, was given further 
consideration, and a committee was ap- 
pointed to take charge of the subject 
and bring it up in a more comprehensive 
way at some future meeting. 

Mr. Bakewell reported that the Loeb 
prize of $S0 had been won by Mr. L. C. 
Rosenburg of San Francisco, and that 
Mr. F. Allamand, Jr., also of San Fran- 
cisco, had been placed fifth in the compe- 
tition. This is the first instance in which 
a San Francisco man has won a prize 
in the Xew York judgment of the Beaux- 
Arts Society and is a gratifying instance 
of the progress of student work in San 
Francisco. 

Mr. Mullgardt reported that the com- 
mittee on the appointment of a State Art 
Commission, which was appointed by the 
last Legislature, has submitted its report 
and that the subject will come up during 
the next Legislative session. 

Mr. Mullgardt introduced the guest of 
the evening, Mr. .\llen True, a painter 
who has been associated with Frank 
Brangwyn. A. R. A., in the preparation 
of the Eight Mural Decorations for the 
Court of .Abundance at the Exposition, 
and who is now engaged in hanging 
them. 

Mr. True gave a most delightful talk 
on his association with Mr. Brangwyn 



and on his work and personality. It 
developed that Mr. True was one of 
those rare individuals who have the pa- 
tience and foresight to record some of 
the intimate sayings and doings of a 
great man and it was a distinct treat to 
be allowed to share some of them with 
him. 

At the conclusion of his talk a unani- 
mous vote of thanks was extended to 
Mr. True. 



Seattle Chapter, A. I. A. 

.A.t the December meeting of the Wash- 
ington State Chapter, American Institute 
of Architects, Harold Ogden Sexsmith 
was elected a junior member of the 
chapter. 

.'\ discussion of a proposed State Hous- 
ing Law was held the bill introduced at 
the last session of the Legislature being 
the basis of the discussion. The chapter 
expressed itself as in favor of a simpli- 
fied form of a State law, one that would 
define general requirements, leaving the 
details of the arrangement and require- 
ments to be worked out by each commu- 
nity for itself to suit its own needs. 

Professor Trevor Kincaid, of the Uni- 
versity of Washington, delivered an 
illuminating address on the art and arch- 
itecture of Japan, in which country Pro- 
fessor Kincaid had spent some time as 
a resident of the city of Tokyo. 



Elected Fellows 

.\t the recent convention in Washing- 
ton of the .\merican Institute of Archi- 
tects Messrs. W. B. Faville of San Fran- 
cisco and Fernand Parmentier of Los. 
Angeles were elected Fellows. 



116 



The Architect and Engineer 



Berkeley's New School Buildings 

A statement of the proposed expendi- 
ture of the $500,000 in school bond 
money, issued by the Berkeley School 
Commission, is as follows: 

Clareniont school — For Cox property, 
$50,000; for 6-room building, $28,000; to- 
tal, $78,000. Architect, Jas. W. Plachek of 
Berkeley. 

Ward and Telegraph school — Property, 
$48,000; building, $100,000; total, $148,- 
000. Architects, Hobart & Cheney of 
San Francisco. 

South Berkeley — Building and prop- 
erty, $108,000. Architect, W. H. Ratclifif 
Jr. 

West Berkeley — Property. $35,000- 
building, $36,000; total, $71,000. Archi- 
tect, Walter Reed, Oakland. 

North Berkeley — Property land build- 
ing. $82,000. Architect, Ernest Coxhead 
of San Francisco. 

The equipment for buildings is set at 
$25,000 and the grand total is figured at 
$512,000. As there is available in the 
1915 bond fund $512,857, a surplus over 
estimates of 857 is apparent. 

A Song of Six Per Cent 

An inside, professional view of the 
architect's scale of remuneration is con- 
tained in the following humorous verses, 
recited at a recent meeting of the Cleve- 
land Chapter of the American Institute 
of Architects: 

"Sing a song of six per cent. 

Pockets full of dough, 

That's what the client thinks 

Because he doesn't know. 

Poor darned architect 

Knows he's just a slob; 

Six per cent is not so much 

Unless you've got a job. 



per cent 



Sing a song of six 
Arc'tec full of _ry( . 
Million-dollar c'nimissions 
Float before his eye; 
When the night is over. 
How his head does ache! 
.■\ yiddish flat at two per 
Is what he'll gladly take.' 



Benefits of State License Law 

At the last convention of the American 
Institute of Architects an interesting re- 
port was read on "Registration and 
Licensing of Architects," showing that 
the various states are fast providing laws 
for the licensing of architects. The laws 
in New Jersey, Louisiana, California and 
the proposed law in Missouri are all 
operated along similar lines. Referring 
to the benefits attained from the Cali- 
fornia Act. Secretary Sylvain Schnnait- 
tacher of the Northern California Dis- 
trict writes as follows: 

The great benefit of the act is in establishing 
the professional status of the architect who is 
licensed, as against the unlicensed practitioner, who 
IS barred from competing for public work and 
also is in the position that if he sues to recover 
from a client for service, the fact that he is 
unlicensed is accepted as an admission of incom- 
petence to perform the services for which he 
seeks to recover. 



Institute Code Rule Suspended Affecting 
School Competitions 

Members of the American Institute of 
Architects in California have been re- 
lieved of any professional embarrassment 
by the action of the board of directors 
of the Institute in suspending during 
1915 the code relative to competitions 
so far as it may apply to school buildings 
erected in conformity with the law of 
1872. This law requires school trustees 
to advertise for plans for buildings and 
provides that the architect selected must 
give a bond for $5,000 guaranteeing that 
the structure can be erected within the 
specified cost. The code .of the Institute 
prohibits its meiribers participating in 
competitions not held in accordance with 
the same and as the law of 1872 will not 
permit full compliance with the Institute 
code, the temporary suspension of the 
code will materially assist Institute arch- 
itects engaged in school work. The sus- 
pension of the code was recommended 
by the Institute convention at Washing- 
ton and the matter was referred to the 
board of directors, which took action in 
accordance therewith immediately. 



Burying Hatchets 

"To show how the spirit of peace now 
broods over the proceedings of San 
Francisco Chapter, A. I. A., under Mr. 
Faville's presidency," remarked a mem- 
ber the other day, "it is gratifying to 
note that several long standing feuds 
were forever ended at the memorable 
meeting held on the 19th of November. 
Not the least of these was the healing 
of the breech between Willis Polk and 
B. J. S. Cahill. 

"These two architects, who were close 
friends for many years, fell out on the 
question of the Civic Center issue of 
1909, when Polk so ably championed the 
Burnham plan and Cahill opposed it with 
a scheme of his own. 

"On the occasion in question Mr. Ca- 
hill read the principal paper of the even- 
ing, and Mr. Polk very handsomely 
expressed his appreciation. As the paper 
read by Cahill was a plea for peace in 
the Chapter it may be said, therefore, to 
have borne immediate fruit." 



Engineers and Architects' New Officers 

The Engineers and Architects' Asso- 
ciation of Los Angeles have elected the 
following officers for 1915: Samuel Stor- 
row, president; A. H. Koebig, first vice- 
president; W. A. E. Noble, second vice- 
president; Arthur S. Bent, J. J. Backus, 
A. C. Martin and Kenneth Shively, di- 
rectors. 

The association is interested in a pro- 
posed bill to be submitted to the next 
legislature, to govern expert testimony 
in civil and criminal cases. 



The Architect and Engineer 



117 



Prospects for Architects 

Castroville, which is a growing town 
on the Southern Pacific Coast line, near 
Salinas, is to have a new bank building, 
and it is &aid officials of the First Na- 
tional Bank of San Francisco are inter- 
ested in the project. No architect has 
been selected. 



Redwood City Supervisors have bought 
a site for a County Jail. No architect 
has been selected as yet. 



An addition of two wings for jail pur- 
poses to the County Courthouse at San 
Rafael is proposed by the Supervisors. 



The City Trustees of Porterville have 
taken up unofficially the matter of construct- 
ing a City Hall to house city officers, jail and 
fire department. A building that will 
cost about $25,000 is contemplated. No 
architect has been engaged. 



Oakland is to have four branch li- 
braries. The architect for only one of 
these buildings has been selected. He 
is W. H. Weeks, Architects for the other 
buildings will be selected shortly. 



According to the Hawley Investment 
Company, Syndicate Building, Oakland, 
H. S. Crane of Turlock. has purchased 
a lot, 8S feet frontage on Broadway, 
near Twenty-first street, Oakland, upon 
which the owner will erect a store and 
office building. No further details are 
available, and so far as known no archi- 
tect has yet been selected. 

Another real estate deal of importance 
has just 'been closed by Myers & White 
of that city. The building on Thirteenth 
street, between Franklin and Webster, 
now occupied by a furniture house, has 
been bought by a capitalist who will 
convert it into a modern office building. 



Samuel T. Bryer of Gerson & Bryer, 
126 Bush street, San Francisco, chairman 
of the Building Committee of the Com- 
mercial Travelers' 1915 Congress, stated 
recently that while the committee has 
the plans of a number of architects under 
consideration, no architect for its proposed 
home has been chosen, nor will there be one 
named before February 1st. The building 
is to be erected on Polk street, south of 
Hayes, and is to cost $50,000. 



Mr. Meyet Gets Important Commission 

Architect Frederick H. Meyer of San 
Francisco has been commissioned to 
prepare plans for a new school building 
for the Cogswell Polytechnic School at 
Twenty-Sixth and Folsom streets. One or 
more buildings will be included in the im- 
provements, and about $130,000 will be ex- 
pended now with the possibility of a larger 
sum later on. Construction will be Class C. 



More About Palo Alto School 

Architects Allison & Allison of Los 
Angeles are making good progress on 
the plans for the new high school at 
Palo Alto. It has been decided to build 
a group of four buildings, each one and 
two stories in height and they will be 
constructed of interlocking tile, faced 
with brick, terra cotta and cement. It 
is the intention to complete preliminary 
plans at once, so that a bond election 
can be held to vote tlie necessary money 
required to put up the buildings. 

There is some talk of contesting the ap- 
pointment of Architects Allison & Allison 
on the ground that the board has violated 
the provisions of the old State law of 1872, 
which requires the selection of an architect 
by competition. 



Another Large Building for Julia Morgan 

In addition to designing the new 
Y. W. C. A. building at San Jose, to 
cost $100,000, Miss Julia Morgan of San 
Francisco has been commissioned to 
prepare plans for a hotel to be erected 
in San Francisco, and to be the head- 
quarters of young women who come to 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition. Money 
for this building is being subscribed by 
local associations throughout the coun- 
try. A Class C structure three or four 
stories in height will be erected. 



Sacramento Wants a Civic Center 
The City Plaza of Sacramento, oppo- 
site the City Hall, will become the 
nucleus of a Civic Center, upon which will 
be erected the new City Library, a Mu- 
nicipal Auditorium, a Central Fire Sta- 
tion and, if possible, the Crocker Art 
Gallery. It is hoped soon to start work 
on the new library building, for which 
the Carnegie Corporation has ofTered to 
provide $100,000. 



Tacoma Society of Architects 

The December meeting of tlie Tacoma 
Society of Architects was given over to 
the study of the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition. The meeting, which 
was led by Earl N. Dugan, was the first 
of a series as outlined by the program 
committee, at which different subjects of 
an educational nature will be considered. 

The Tacoma Society of Architects re- 
cently elected the following officers: 
C. F. Mahon, president; George Gove, 
vice-president; H. A. Bell, secretary and 
treasurer, and Luther Twichell, moder- 
ator. The council of the society is com- 
posed of the president, secretary and 
moderator. A program is being formu- 
lated for each monthly meeting through- 
out the year. 



118 



Tlic Architect and EwAuccr 



San Francisco Architects Meet with Los 
Angeles Chapter 

A delegation of architects from San 
Francisco, consisting of Messrs. William 
Mooser, William B. Faville and Edgar A. 
Mathews, met with the Southern California 
Chapter of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, on Saturday evening, January 9th. 
President Alhert C. Martin presided. 

An interesting talk on the San Francisco 
Exposition was given by Mr. Faville of the 
lirm of Bliss & Faville. He stated that the 
exposition buildings will contain an area of 
sixty-tive acres under roof. The Chicago 
and St. Louis expositions had one hundred 
and seven and one hundred and twenty 
acres respectively. The architectural com- 
mission decided to limit the area at San 
Francisco to si.xty-iive acres, in opposition 
to the desire of other exposition officials, 
because San Francisco is located on the ex- 
treme western edge of the country in a 
thinly settled district as compared with 
either Chicago or St. Louis, which are the 
centers for a population of millions. Ex- 
tremely interesting was his description of 
the method used in coloring the concrete 
and plaster used in the construction of the 
buildings and colonnades by which these 
structures will not have the appearance of 
being recent creations but the look of new- 
ness will be worn off and they will give the 
impression of having been erected fifty 
years ago. This effect is also aided by the 
wind and fog. The architectural commis- 
sion was given twelve million dollars with 
which to achieve the remarkable results at- 
tained. The Chicago cominission had 
eighteen million dollars, which would be 
equal to about twenty-five million today. 

Messrs. Mooser and Mathews addressed 
the members on matters of interest to the 
profession, outlining some of the experi- 
ences of the San Francisco and other chap- 
ters in the conduct of their affairs. 

The board of directors reported that Mr. 
Garrett Van Pelt of Pasadena, had' been 
elected to membership. The question of 
holding an architectural exhibition in Los 
Angeles this year was discussed. It was the 
consensus of opinion that if an exhibition 
was held it should be strictly and distinctly 
architectural and under the jurisdiction of 
the Chapter. Mr. Henry F. Withey was 
appointed chairman of the committee with 
the privilege of naming his own assistants. 



they might become liable for violating 
treaty rights of the United States with 
other nations. The constitutionality of 
tlie law will be tested at once. 



Is This Law Constitutional? 

Work on several buildings in Phoenix 
and other parts of Arizona recently has 
been stopped on account of Arizona's 
new 80 per cent law which was passed at 
the last election. The law provides that 
80 per cent of the workmen on any job 
must be American citizens. Proponents 
of the law are out to see that it is obeyed 
and the contractors in desiring to abide 
by the act, have been informed by their 
attorneys that in discharging their 
foreign laborers in order to favor others. 



Competitions for Buildings at Salem, 
Massachusetts 

A considerable sum of money has been 
set aside by the Salem authorities to 
assist in various ways those who are 
desirous to rebuild in the burnt district. 
This fund is in the hands of trustees 
constituting what is known as the Salem 
Rebuilding Trust. Desiring to improve 
in the most comprehensive manner a 
certain tract of land within the burnt 
district, the Salem Rebuilding Trust in- 
vites architects generally throughout the 
country to participate in two competi- 
tions: one to secure the maximum hous- 
ing possibilities on the lot, the second 
to secure sketch plans for a four-story 
apartment house. Two prizes of $100 
and $75 will be offered to the designs 
placed respectively first and second in 
each. The plans will be judged by the 
trust with the assistance of C. H. Black- 
all, advisory architect to the Salem Re- 
building Commission. Architects who 
care to take part in these competitions 
are requested to communicate at once 
with the Salem Rebuilding Trust, Pea- 
liody building, Salem, Mass. 



To Remove Dome 

The Los Angeles Municipal .\r\. Coin- 
mission has reversed its former decision 
and now recommends that the dome of 
the branch City Hall at San Pedro be 
removed and replaced with a water-tight 
roof. The finance committee of the 
Council recommended that the building 
department be instructed to proceed at 
once with the work. The dome had de- 
veloped many leaks and the city officials 
appear to have been in a quandary as to 
how best it might be fixed without a 
great expenditure. 



Hollow Tile Residence 

.■\rchitect Elmer Grey of Los Angeles 
has taken bids for a two-story basement 
and attic residence to be built at Coro- 
nado Beach for Gale Thompson. Schmidt 
Garden & Martin of Chicago are the 
architects. The house will contain about 
fourteen rooms in addition to a large 
hall. 



Granted Certificates to Practice 

.\t a meeting of the California State 
Board of Architecture, Northern Dis- 
trict held on December 29th, 1914, the 
following were granted certificates to 
practice architecture : 

Erie J. Osborn, San Francisco. 

F. A. Sandford Foale, Sacramento. 

William Koenig, San Francisco, 



Reviews of Recent Books 

of Interest to the 

Architectural and Engineering Professions 

By CHARLES HENRY CHENEY 



EARLY AMERICAN CIIL"RCnES. l;.v Ayniar 
Embury IL 

This book will appeal to all architects 
who desire to understand and know the 
real Colonial architecture with more in- 
sight than just measured drawings can 
give. Written by a practicing architect 
of rare abilitj', the volume contains 102 
photographs of the interiors and exte- 
riors of practically every American 
church of the Colonial period which is 
of architectural interest or historical 
association. As the author says: "To 
the architect the principal interest in 
these old buildings is, of course, their 
forms, in which were expressed the su- 
preme efforts of the artistic genius of 
our ancestors, the designers of the 
Colonial period, who were inheritors and 
practitioners of a concrete and perfected 
tradition such as does not even today 
exist. Their furniture, their dwellings, 
and their public buildings were all prod- 
ucts of the same genius and the same 
ideal, and today we are seeking and find- 
ing in them sources of inspiration no 
less satisfactory than the best that 
Europe l\as to offer." 

Published by Doubleday, Page & Com- 
pany, New York. $2.80 net. 



TRANSACTIONS OF THE LIVERPOOL TOWN 
PLANNING AND HOUSING CONFER- 
ENCE, 1914. Edited by S. D. Adshcad and 
Patrick Abercronibie. 

This volume ably presents to our 
American gropings after real city plan- 
ning and housing the other side of the 
subject as it works out in execution. The 
English Town Planning Act of 1909 has 
now inade compulsory careful planning 
with relation to the future, of all phys- 
ical changes in English cities. The dis- 
cussions at this conference cover 
practically all sides of city planning, still 
only in the educational or promotion 
.*tage in most cities of the United States. 
The questions taken up show an interest- 
ing balance between schemes for the 
handling of traffic, housing, restrictions, 
garden suburbs, with methods for most 
equitably paying for these improvements. 
This is indeed a book for practical City 
Planners. 

Published by the University Press of 
Liverpool. 7s 6d net. 



While written primarily for the coun- 
try village, this book, by the Cliairman 
of the Village Improvement Committee 
of tlie Massachusetts Civic League, will 
be of great interest to all district and 
city improvement clubs and to all those 
lending their efforts to organize public 
committees for civic betterment of any 
kind. The great difficulty found in mak- 
ing the work of sucli organizations effec- 
tive can only be overcome bj' the guid- 
ance of such simple books as this, wliich 
seems to cover practically all the sub- 
jects of improvement work before the 
public today. 

Published by Sturgis & Walton Co., 
New York. $1 net. 

STEEL CONSTRUCTION. Uy Heniv Tackson 
Burt. 

A small, practical pocket book, well 
illustrated with tables, for the use of the 
profession in office building construction. 
It seems to cover this phase of steel 
construction very fully, including several 
points not ordinarily found in hand 
books, such as wind bracing and the 
design and construction of built-up 
girders. 

Published by The .American Technical 
Society, Chicago. $2.75. 



CARRYING OUT THE CITY PLAN— The prac- 
tical application of American law in the 
execution of city plans by Flavel Shurtleff, 
in collaboration with Frederick Law Olmsted. 

Widespread interest in city planning 
has found stimulation in very complete 
literature on the aesthetic, engineering 
and social aspects of the problem. We 
find this volume a sane and practical 
guide, calculated to aid those who are 
striving to. bring about practical effi- 
ciency in the carrying out of tlie city 
plan. 

While there has been no attempt to 
compile a comprehensive digest of laws 
or an engineering treatise on city plan- 
ning, the book is legally sound and the 
authors, both notably well equipped for 
the task, have very comprehensively 
pointed their conclusions, and rendered 
a signal service to all who are interested 
in the physical developmejit of their 
home city. 

Published by the Survey Associates. Inc., 
lOS East Twentv-second street, Xew York. 
Postpaid, $2. 



120 



The Architect and Engineer 



nd other Graphi 



Arts, by Ge 



While primarily a practical treatise 
on Etching, the book is of value to all 
those who are in any way interested in 
the graphic arts. 

The author, trained under that mas- 
ter craftsman, Sir Frank Short, has 
endeavored to answer all those technical 
questions which naturally arise when 
studying the various methods of artistic 
expression in black-and-white. 

In two parts, the book covers first, those 
subjects necessary to a complete under- 
standing of etching as a guide to the 
beginner; while later we find a most 
comprehensive and readable treatment 
of the whole field of the graphic arts. 
Both the beginner and more experienced, 
will find the volume of valuable service, 
and of real charm in its illustrations in 
etching, half-tone and line. 

Published by John Lane Companv, 
New York. $1.50 net. 



Other Books Received 

Country Houses, by Aymar Embury. 
Doubleday. Page & Co., New York. $3. 
(Review later.) 

Bill's School and Mine, by W. S. 
Franklin. Franklin, Macnutt & Charles, 
South Bethlehem, Pa. 



Build Now! 

Editor The Architect and Engineer of 
California: — The present time oiifers a 
most favorable opportunity for your pub- 
lication to inaugurate a vigorous cam- 
paign advocating the immediate start of 
building construction. Not in many years 
has been ofifered such a favorable time 
for economical building. Prices of ma- 
terials are low and labor is plentiful. 
Contractors are not busy and are figur- 
ing ver3' closely. 

There seems to be no question but 
that the coming spring will see a decided 
business revival. At that time, new build- 
ings will be required to take care of the 
increased activities. If these buildings 
ar.e to be ready for occupancy in the 
spring, they must be started now. Fur- 
ther than this, the cost of construction 
is sure to increase with returning pros- 
perity, so that the business man who 
delays will not only be hampered for 
space, but will undoubtedly have to pay 
more for his building. 

In conducting a campaign of this kind, 
your publication will be rendering a dis- 
tinct service not only to yourself and 
your readers, but to the building world 
and general public as well. You are 
giving owners valuable advice; you are 
increasing the activties of contractors, 
material manufacturers and labor gener- 
ally; you are materially assisting the 
prosperity of the country, by promoting 
one of its largest basic industries, build. 



ing construction; you are advancing the 
best interests of your own magazine by 
opening up a larger field for subscriptions 
and by stimulating a desire for more 
advertising among the manufacturers. 

We believe that you cannot conduct 
this campaign too vigorously, nor devote 
too much of your reading columns to it. 
Perhaps it might even be worth while 
to adopt some such slogan as "Build 
Now and Save Money — Material Is 
Cheap, Labor Plentiful, Contractors Not 
Busy. Prosperity Coming!" 

S. M. Fecleheimer. 



A Los Angeles Competition 

The problem of providing the best possible 
habitationes for the unskilled wage earners 
at a minimum cost is one of the questions 
now receiving earnest and careful attention 
in every large city in the country. Los 
Angeles has a problem peculiarly her own 
and this the Housing Commission has been 
making strenuous efforts to solve. 

With this object in view the commission 
is offering prizes for designs and plans for 
house courts for unskilled wage earners 
which will afford all necessary comforts and 
conveniences to the occupants and at the 
same time return a small profit to the 
owner. The program for the competition 
has tile approval of the committee on edu- 
cation of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects. It is open to any architect or drafts- 
man. Plans will be received up to noon, 
]\Iarch 11th. 

The awards will be made by a jury com- 
posed of two members of the Housing Com- 
mission of the city of Los Angeles and an 
architect. The jury will make the awards 
within thirty days after the competition is 
closed. Further particulars may be obtained 
by addressing Los Angeles Housing Com- 
mission, City Hall, Los Angeles Citv. 



Pasadena City Engineer Dead 

Lewis Eaton Smith, city engineer of 
Pasadena, died December 18. after a 
lingering illness. He had been in ill 
health for the last two years. Mr. Smith 
was a member of the Engineers and 
.Architects Association of Southern Cali- 
fornia. He graduated from Stanford 
LTniversity civil engineering department 
in 1904 with the degree of B. A. 



Personal 

Sylvtain Schnaittacher, architect, an- 
nounces the removal of his ofiices from 
the First National Bank Building to 233 
Post street, San Francisco. 

Mr. Winsor Soule, architect, announces 
that the firm of Ray & Soule has been 
dissolved, and that he continues the prac- 
tice of architecture at 1206 State street, 
Santa Barbara, California. He would be 
pleased to receive manufacturers' cata- 
logues. 




Heating and Lighting 



Plumbing and Electrical Work 



The Electrical Contractor 
By C. F. BUTTE* 

I have been requested to talk to you 
from a contractor's point of view, and I 
have taken it for granted that I may take 
my views with the aid of a wide angle 
lens and a telescope and touch on many 
angles and phases of the contractor's 
daily work, both at close and distant 
range. 

The subjects, some thirty in number, 
which I will take up bear more upon the 
daily work with which each of us come 
in contact, while carrying on our busi- 
ness and will cover subjects our associa- 
tion has at times taken up and informa- 
tion which may prove of value to many 
of us. No matter what subject is dis- 
cussed before you at these meetings, no 
matter what subject or actions an asso- 
ciation may take, no matter what efforts 
may be spent by individuals, unless such 
actions or efforts result in one thing 
when applied to our business, namely 
greater profits, such actions or efforts 
are not a success. No matter how large 
or how small any business may be, it 
cannot be successful unless a profit is 
shown on the work undertaken, whether 
it is an order or contract amounting to 
one dollar or ten thousand dollars. 

Only through efforts such as have been 
made at meetings of the character of 
today, can we obtain the desired result. 
Information disseminated through such 
talks as we have heard, data and tables 
will be of inestimable value to the elec- 
trical contractor, who is supposed to 
know all branches of the electrical 
business. He is supposed to know 
the various contract forms of all 
the power companies, the class of serv- 
ices in all parts of the city, must be fa- 
miliar with every appliance, device or 
fitting made by all of the many manu- 
facturers, some ten thousand or more in 
number, must know where to get the 
proper materials, must know the many 
rules and regulations of the National 
Underwriters and local departments, as 
well as the idiosyncrasies of the different 
local inspectors, must understand the 
many methods of building construction, 

*Mr. Butte is a member of the Butte Engineer- 
ing and Electric Company of San Francisco. This 
p^per was read before the State convention 
Electrical Contractors and Dealers' .Association, 
and will appear in this magazine in two install- 
ments. 



must understand and interpret somewhat 
indefinite and indififerent plans and speci- 
fications and agree to furnish all items 
and materials essential, whether specified 
or not, must be a good judge of work- 
men and workmanship, must be able to 
correctly test and report and give advice 
on motors, generators and electrical 
machinery, and be willing to give bids 
to correct any fault or damage and back 
up his judgment with his capital by 
spending money for labor and material 
to correct the trouble and from the time 
he starts until he stops the contractor 
is "going some." In fact, the contractor 
must be like the widower who married a 
widow and had to decide wdiy his si-x 
boys and her si.x boys were fighting their 
six boys. It therefore behooves all of 
us to gather as much knowledge and 
advice through associating with one an- 
other as possible. 

The four subjects paramount to all 
other subjects in any contractor's busi- 
ness, are: Proper estimating, getting 
the business, a proper cost upon comple- 
tion of work, and the collection of the 
bills. All other parts of our business or 
in fact of any business are incidental to 
these four subjects. 

Proper Estimating 

Estimating properly is something 
overlooked by manj- contractors and in- 
deed seems to be the most vital question 
we have to handle. The fact that a con- 
siderable variation may e.xist in bids that 
may be submitted on a contract, does 
not always indicate that some error has 
been made by the estimator, however 
wide the variation may be, but it shows 
that some differences in interpretation 
of the plans and specifications exists, it 
indicates that some vital factors in the 
handling of the business are unbeknown 
to the estimators, it indicates that some 
estimator is forced to get the contract 
to hold his job as an estimator, it indi- 
cates that there may be some angel 
backing the concern and the manager 
makes one job cover up the loss on the 
other as long as the angel's wings can 
be clipped, it indicates that some prefer^ 
ence is given or that a joker exists in 
the specifications, it indicates that a 
standard is sorely in need for estimat- 
ing purposes, a standard not only in 
the method of estimating, but a 
standard for materials, a standard 



122 



Tlic Architect and Eii<;iiiccr 



for iiuality, a standard for construc- 
tion. This cjiiestion leads us also to the 
point of standardizing specifications. 
There may be no question what class of 
material a specification may call for. but, 
does the specification cover quality in 
all respects? Uniform, concise, definite 
specifications and specifications that are 
complete would certainly rectify many 
of the evils of estimating existing at the 
present time and would mean that all 
competitors who figure and bid on the 
work covered thereby, would know ex- 
actly what is wanted, how the work must 
be done and therefore, would base their 
estimate on the same class and character 
of work. Unquestionably, the many va- 
ried bids now prevailing in the award of 
a contract would be reduced and more 
uniform and better conditions would pre- 
vail could this ideal condition be ob- 
tained in the writing of specifications. 
Not only would we be benefited as stated 
before, but we would also know what 
we should prepare for in advance of 
receiving any contract; our stocks of 
materials could be handled more eco- 
nomically and better, our standards of 
constructions could be more readily 
grasped by our men, thereby raising 
their standard and efficiency, our bulky 
detail work could be reduced and in 
many ways our efiforts and work re- 
duced, thereby increasing our profits 
without increasing our costs. A condi- 
tion of this kind can never be obtained 
by individual eflfort, but must be carried 
on continuously by the concerted effort 
of all association members, each and all 
working collectively and individually 
through their association. 

Many of the leaks, many of the mis- 
takes and many detrimental contracts 
would be avoided and stopped by a stan- 
dard specification and many charges to 
experience would be saved the contrac- 
tor, again showing a profit. Further- 
more, a standard specification w-ould 
raise the quality of the work, as it is 
human nature collectively to standard- 
ize the best and not the poorest. We 
also find many specifications that are 
practically excerpts from the code in ad- 
dition to the clause that the work must 
comply with the N. E. C. and local rules, 
while frequently these same specifica- 
tions are very indefinite on points that 
should he fully covered. This lack of 
definiteness is liable to furnish a contrac- 
tor reasons to bid on inferior work, such 
as ordinary plug cutouts instead of panel 
boards and switches, wood planking for 
main switchboard and many items of this 
kind, as long as it will pass inspection. 

The education of the public in demand- 
ing and using standard electric materials 
and wiring would aid greatly to the 
adoption of standard specifications, as 
it is a fact that the public is our con- 
sumer even though dealing through an 



architect or engineer. We may say that 
the real cause for lack of a standard in 
specifications is the ignorance of the lay- 
man regarding the difference in quality 
of materials and work, as most of it is 
concealed when they see it, and as long 
as the lamp brightens, even if not up to 
full candlepower, they believe the work 
is well done. In contracting for other 
things land in the purchase thereof the 
average citizen seldom considers lowest 
price, but generally considers quality. 
Brown could buy a suit of black cloth for 
$12.50 but, does he not pay $25.00 instead, 
as it is of better quality? Is it not rea- 
sonable to presume he would do the 
same if he knew something about the 
quality of electrical materials? The time 
that it would require to educate the pub- 
lic to this point may take longer than 
we could claim on this world, but let 
us endeavor to educate the architects 
and engineers to this point assiduously 
and hasten the termination of cliaotic 
conditions. 

A standard for materials of equal qual- 
ity although made by different manufac- 
turers would aid greatly towards obviat- 
ing unpleasant arguments with owners 
and architects. A standard of this kind 
would also correct the chaotic condition 
of our stocks, as we now have many 
brands of the same thing on our shelves. 

The contractor is not entirely free 
from blame for any chaotic conditions 
that may exist at the present time, as 
many contractors could not be depended 
upon to recognize quality for materials 
and construction, but rather than lose 
a contract would base their bids on infe- 
rior and poorer construction and ma- 
terials. 

Another deficiency prevalent with our 
fellow memliers and competitors, and 
which seems a common fault with all 
of us, is the lack of importance given to 
the consideration of items of expense 
and unproductive labor costs, that enter 
into our costs to carry on our business. 

The items that constitute overhead ex- 
pense are many. In brief, any expendi- 
tures in salaries, rents, light and power, 
stationary telephones, cartage charges, 
stock losses and in fact any expenditures 
that cannot and are not charged directly 
to the costs of your work should be con- 
sidered as overhead expense. The fol- 
lowing lines will vividly convey the nec- 
essity of knowing something about your 
overhead expense and the application of 
your knowledge in your work. 
Of bookkeeping I knew nary a line. 
Of credits and finance the same; 
But still, I went into the business 
Of wiring — a wonderfully easy game. 
I never considered such trifles as rent, 
.And taxes and insurance, thought I, 
Were small considerations after they 

were spent — • 
My profits would show bye and bye. 



The Architect and Ens'iuccr 



123 



What knew I of overhead expense. 
Or of the items of whicli it was made? 
They told me it was at least 34 and 

six-tenths, 
The monthly amounis which I had paid. 

There were thirty-nine reasons all to- 
gether 

Why 1 failed and was put on the "run," 

The thirty-ninth and most important 
was — 

I should never have begun. 

Getting the Business 

Initiative is unquestionaljjy the key- 
note and answer to getting the business. 
We only need to look around a wee bit 
to see that this one word explains the 
success of all our successful business 
men, all of our great workers, all of our 
great inventors, and all of our great men. 
Can we not trace the wonderful work 
of Thomas A. Edison to initiative? Was 
not the great work of George Westing- 
house due to initiative? Is not the suc- 
cess of any of our great business con- 
cerns of the present day due to initia- 
tive? This one word will explain how 
to get the business and no matter how 
brilliant a man may be, no matter wdiat 
capital may be available, no matter what 
resources or qualifications may be com- 
manded, if initiative is not combined 
therewith success cannot and will not 
be obtained. This world will not and 
does not want at the pinnacle of success 
any man who does not do the right 
thing at the right time without being 
told. The world only bestows its big 
prizes, honor, money and success, for 
this one thing — initiative. 

Service is another quality essential for 
getting the business. While' this word 
is undoubtedly overworked, the action 
unquestionably is underworked. 

Service to your regular customer even 
though he may not have an order at the 
time, but wants to know about some- 
thing that you should know about, is 
an item frequently neglected. Service 
means to get your men at the job at 
the hour promised and when the job is 
completed it will be the job done and not 
the customer. Service means to be pre- 
pared for any emergency that may arise, 
and to be able to handle any matters 
pertaining to your business without de- 
lay. Service means to have men avail- 
able by rearranging work on hand to 
take care of any urgent case, and give 
your customer power or liglit with least 
possible delay. 

Frequently one hoars of other branches 
of the building industry calling upon a 
contractor to take care of certain work 
at once and when the men arrive at the 
building the work cannot be done for 
several days hence. Do you know why 
this occurs? The writer has investigated 



several of these cases and invariably the 
same reply is given, "You electrical con- 
tractors are always a couple of days be- 
hind in your promises and for this rea- 
son we call up beforehand to be sure the 
men will be on the job in time." 

Fellow-contractors, we must correct 
our own faults before we can correct 
the faults of other branches of the busi- 
ness and profession. In many ways you 
can show your old customers and pros- 
pective customers through acconumoda- 
tion and service, that their orders and 
business should be handled by you, and 
with initiative and progressive actions 
you undoubtedly will succeed in landing 
many orders and contracts. 

Service is also a vital factor in obtain- 
ing proper costs in your work, service 
in handling your materials, service in 
furnishing the necessary tools, and serv- 
ice in furnishing your men with the 
proper information, plans and working 
layouts. Do you all realize the labor lost 
unnecessarily by the starting and carry- 
iny on your work with insutricient infor- 
mation and working layouts? Can you 
expect your men to work efificiently, 
economically and rapidly if they must 
ravel into a set of plans consisting of 
many sheets each time they start a run 
of conduit? Can you expect your men 
to complete the work within reasonable 
time, if they must stop and start on the 
same parts several times on account of 
lack of detail? 

Do not always blame the man who 
performs the work when the labor costs 
on your work is high. First investigate 
and discover the reasons therefor, and 
possibly it may be on account of delin- 
quent service over which the man had no 
control. I say "over which the man had 
no control" for the reason that service 
enters in a considerable degree into the 
work the men perform over which the 
man has control. Can you believe that 
the average man uses only ten per cent 
of his brain cells and ten per cent of 
his physical powers? This average was 
deducted after careful research over a 
long period by the late Professor James 
of Harvard. The statement made is pos- 
sibly very startling, however, is it not 
true that man's failure can be traced to 
mental and physical inefficiency and lack 
of power to concentrate and apply the 
qualities that he may possess? Have 
you not heard of men who are efficient 
when working for one contractor and 
inefficient when employed by another? 
The reason is human inefficiency, either 
on the part of the employer or employee, 
and should be overcome by the develop- 
ment of human efficiency. All these fac- 
tors enter into the costs of your work 
and are vital to all of us. as our profits 
depend upon our costs when contracts 
are completed. 



124 



The Architect and EivAneer 



The material item is also a vital factor 
in your ultimate cost, not only in the 
sense of purchases, but also in the man- 
ner in which it is handled, supplied and 
delivered to the work. 

The shortage of material on your work 
is an evil for which there is absolutely 
no excuse. However, you must admit 
that such shortages do exist. I do not 
include materials that are required for 
alterations or changes made in the work 
as it is underway, but materials which 
you knew about before the work was 
started. 

(Concluded in the February Number.) 



Height of Sinks 

A prominent architect in New York 
recently wrote to an industrial paper: 

I wonder whether or not your attention has 
ever been called to the growing dissatisfaction 
among women, who are the most frequent users 
of these fixtures, especially of kitchen sinks, with 
this "standard height," and to the fact that such 
architects as are awake to new ideas are more 
and more specifying that these fixtures be set 
higher than thirty inches, generally thirty-four 
or thirtv-six inches? 

Women have strained their backs for years 
over low kitchen sinks, but are now rising in 
protest against a practice which is almost criminal 
in its indifference to the comfort of those who 
are forced to lean over when they might just as 
well stand straight. I presume it will be a genera- 
tion before all the old sinks have been changed, 
but I sincerely hope it will not take that length 
of time to convince all the plumbers and plumbing 
supply houses that thirty-six inches is better than 
thirty for the height of sinks and lavatories, 
that washtubs, too. as a rule, ha 
low. 



been set too 



Klimm Opposes Sanitary Device 

Frank J. Klinmi, a San Francisco 
plumber-contractor and member of the 
City Board of Health, has succeeded in 
getting the Board to withhold its ap- 
proval of a meritorious sanitary combi- 
nation bathtub, manufactured by the 
Improved Sanitary Fixture Company of 
Los Angeles, where nearly 300 of these 
tubs are in use and have been pro- 
nounced highly satisfactory. The fixture 
saves the owner quite a little "roughing 
in" expense and naturally the plumbers 
are opposed to it. It is likely the tubs will 
be installed in San Francisco just the same, 
and the courts will be asked to pass upon 
the matter. 



Safety First 

A concern that can put up a certified 
check for $350,000 (as the McArthur 
Eros. Company did in the Twin Peaks 
Tunnel contest), must be ranked with the 
"Big Fellows." 

The McArthur Bros. Company have a 
record extending over 86 years for ac- 
complishing great engineering feats and 
such enterprises as the Erie canal, the 
Chicago Drainage canal, Sault Ste. Marie 
Water Power canal, the Massachusetts 
dam for the city of Boston, the Ivatonah 
dam for the city of New York, the Asho- 
kan dam and reservoir for the city of 
New York, besides many hundreds of 



miles of important railroad systems of 
the country, all bear evidence to their en- 
gineering skill. As engineer constructors 
they are prepared to furnish preliminary 
reports, reconnaissance and surveys, 
plans and specifications, operation of 
property, estimates of cost, revenue and 
expense, construction and erection, rec- 
ord of costs, account statistics. An esti- 
mate of cost prepared by this company 
is based not only on ascertained en- 
gineering data, but upon a broad experi- 
ence in the field as constructors. The 
importance of this feature will be appre- 
ciated by those who have financed enter- 
prises where a combination of engineer- 
ing skill and construction experience has 
not been utilized. 

The McArthur Bros. Company con- 
trols and has at its disposal one of the 
largest plants of contractors' equipment 
in the country. This is always imme- 
diately available for work, thus assuring 
prompt execution of contracts. 

The McArthur Bros. Company have 
offices in New York, Chicago and San 
Francisco. 

Judson Manufacturing Company Now 
Operating an Open-Hearth Furnace 

THE accoinpanying photographs show 
the latest enterprise of a Pacific 
Coast steel manufactory — an open- 
hearth furnace — of the Judson Manufac- 
turing Company, one of the largest steel 
and iron firms in California. The in- 
creased demand for a fine grade of 
soft steel for merchant trade, manu- 
facturing, wagon-making, etc., convinced 
Vice-President French that the Coast 
offered a field for a home product, 
and at no small expense the plant 
has been equipped with furnace and 
machinery for turning out mild steel 
bars, small angles and universal plates 
in the same range of sizes as it has here- 
tofore supplied in double refined iron. 
By the open-hearth process the ingots 
are bottom poured, according to the lat- 
est practice of steel making. It is 
claimed the product equals in every par- 
ticular that heretofore brought from the 
East and is sold on a strictly competi- 
tive basis with the Eastern product. No 
doubt the Judson company will find a 
ready market for its new product; in 
fact, Mr. French says the capacity of the 
furnace has already been reached. 

In connection with this new departure 
it is interesting to note that the plant 
was designed by one of the foremost 
open-hearth engineers in the United 
States — Mr. S. T. Wellman of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, who has probably designed 
more plants of this type than any other 
one engineer in the world. The Judson 
plant is in charge of Mr. H. W. Lash, 
for many years general manager of the 
Carbon Steel Company of Pittsburg, and 
recognized as among the best in his line 
in this country. 



The Architect and Engineer 



125 





lU'o r//iir.\ I'/" .//7>V(>.V MAM'F iCrCRI\(., L'nMr-IXi'S .ThX HEARTH FURS ACES 



state, County and Municipal 

tnginCCnng Good Roads-Water-Sewers 

— Bridges — Fire Protection 



The Brick Road and Its Construction* 

By JAMES M. McCLEARY 
(Continued from December Number) 

Be careful not to injure your curbing 
during the later stages of construction. 
Careless hauling of heavy loads or 
machinery over an unprotected edge will 
cause breaks which expose the brick to 
abnormal v\'ear. This caution has fre- 
quently been violated in my observation. 

I would issue three warnings with 
respect to concrete bases; don't use con- 
crete that is not homogenous; don't 
tolerate the existence of voids; don't be 
satisfied with a finished surface that is 
not uniformly smooth. In addition to 
these points, one should observe all the 
other cautions that apply generally to 
concrete mixing. 

The value of the first and second warn- 
ings is apparent when you consider that 
the sole object of a foundation is to 
strengthen the natural bearing surface 
and transmit the burden widely and uni- 
formly. The third caution is to prevent 
such projections or depressions in the 
concrete as shall result in a dififerent 
depth of sand cushion at different points. 

The importance of this feature will be 
apparent after the rolling of the brick 
surface is in progress. An undulating 
surface of brick means a sounding board 
effect wlien the pavement is brought into 
use and a possible breaking of the bond. 
Mere spreading of the sand is never suf- 
ficient. It should be rolled and re-shaped 
repeatedly until both the surface and the 
densit3' are uniform. Too often the road 
builder contents himself with one rolling 
after which he fills the depressions with 



loose sand and finishes the surface with 
a template. Each refilling should be fol- 
lowed by rolling, a hand roller of 350 
pounds weight being most satisfactory. 
A soft, uncompacted sand cushion will 
work up between the brick, when the 
latter are rolled. 

In the culling of brick, good judgment 
is the exception. Many seeming defects, 
as viewed by the casual inspector, are not 
defects. The cull pile may well be ex- 
amined for later decision on some of the 
brick that were hastily eliminated. Soft- 
ness is the chief defect to avoid. Kiln 
marks frequently indicate unusually good 
brick, because they are due to fusibility 
and pressure from the weight of overly- 
ing brick in the kilns and fusibility means 
vitrification. Be sure that your brick are 
used their best side up. Delivery to the 
setter in such a position is recommended. 
Be sure that the lugs are all in the same 
direction. The purpose of the lug is to 
provide a uniform interstice and permit 
the grout to descend to the bottom of 
the brick. Laminations are not to be 
avoided. If you visit a brick plant you 
will see that the very process of making 
bricks entails the existence of lamina- 
tions. 

Don't begin your rolling in the center 
of the pavement. Roll adjacent to the 
curb first, approaching the center gradu- 
ally. When the center has been reached, 
start at the opposite curb and repeat the 
process. 

Good grouting, like charity, covereth a 
multitude of sins. No badly grouted 
pavement was ever a good pavement. Ijut 
well grouted pavements have sometimes 
passed muster for consideraljle periods in 




The Panels tKat are 
as ^ood as tKey are 
famous. 



FinisH tKat Job 
\vitK SmootK Panels 

Wybro Panels have a beautiful smooth finish and 
never blister or curl up. They RETAIN their smooth 
finish INDEFINITELY. 

In point of quality and smoothness of finish Wybro 
Panels have no equal. 

Use the best — It pays. 

WHiTi: Brothers 

5tK and Brannan Sts. San Francisco 



The Architect and Enc'ineer 



127 



spite of gross faults in other details of 
construction. Three successive applica- 
tions of a one to one mixture of Portland 
cement and clean sand has been my rule. 
The utmost care in selecting materials, 
in applying the grout and sweeping it into 
the very bottom of the cracks will be 
repaid in results. Anything less than the 
most e.xacting care in the application of 
grout is just like throwing labor and ma- 
terial away. 

We have roads now bearing a heavy 
traffic whose first cost is their last 
cost to date, although they have been 
down a decade or more. How many 
decades this state of affairs will continue 
is a matter than can be only guessed, for, 
as a government bulletin so aptly states, 
"no properly constructed lirick pavement 
has ever j-et worn out." 



Cracks in Concrete Roads 

In view of the importance of the fact 
that cracking of concrete roads is gener- 
ally considered to be one of the most 
serious objections to them and the most 
difficult to avoid, the Municipal Journal 
expresses the opinion that sufficient 
attention has not been given by engi- 
neers and road-builders generally to the 
report of the committee of the National 
Conference on Concrete Road-Building 
concerning the contraction and expan- 
sion of concrete roads, based largelj- 
on investigations made by the U. S. 
Bureau of Standards. 

One of the most important features of 
this report, as well as that which un- 
doubtedly seemed the most novel to 
many, was the statement and apparent 
proof that not only does concrete ex- 
pand with the obsorption of moisture 
and contract as it dries out, but that this 
effort of temperature changes and may 
be sufficient to cause a stress in the con- 
crete opposite to that which would be 
caused by a normal temperature change. 
Moreover this effect of moisture absorp- 
tion and drying out apparently continues 
throughout the life of the concrete. It 
would seem to follow, therefore, states 
the committee, "that the condition that 
would provide for a decrease in mois- 



STRUCTURAL 

STEEL FRESNO 



Complete Stock of 


COLUMNS 


ANGLES 


GIRDERS 


TEES 


BEAMS 


PLATES 


CHANNELS 


CASTINGS 



MODERN EQUIPPED STEEL, 

FABRICATING PLANT and 

IRON FOUNDRY 

W furnish and erect Building 

Steel, Bridge Steel, Tank Towers, 

Sidewalk Doois, Fire Escapes, 

Ornamental and Cast Iron. 

J.H.BURMETT 
IROIN WORKS 



Fresno, California 



ture content when tlie temperature in- 
creases and an increase in the moisture 
content when the temperature decreases, 
would be an ideal one." 

The experiments made also indicate 
that variation in the quality of the con- 
crete will cause a variation in the tend- 
ency to expand and contract with change 
in moisture content, as dense mixtures 
absorb moisture less rapidly than porous 
ones. Consequently, if there are two 
qualities of concrete in a road existing 
either as a top and bottom layer or in 
two masses (such as two successive 
batches of slightly different mixture) 
occurring side by side, the more porous 
of the two would have a tendency to 
expand more than the other and conse- 
quently move a greater distance, result- 



HIGH GRADE 

[LKTRICAL CONSTRUCTION WORK 

FOR BUILDINGS 

BUTT[ [NGINKRING AND ELECTRIC CO., 683-87 Howard Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



128 



77(1' Architect and Engineer 



ing in tensile stresses and possibly in 
shearing between the two masses of 
concrete. If the base of a two-course 
pavement is more porous than the top, 
the tendency would be for the former to 
expand and contract more than the lat- 
ter and thus cause a separation of the 
two. 

The above is the strongest possible 
argument for securing absolute uniform- 
ity in both proportioning and mixing, 
in order that not only all of the contents 
of any one batch but also all the batches 
in a given pavement, shall be as nearly 
as possible absolutely uniform in com- 
position and homogeneous in structure. 
How far this is from realiziation in too 
many concrete roads is known by many 
engineers who have given the subject 
attention. 



High Cost of Bidding 

A report prepared by the Illinois 
Chapter of the .American Institute of 
Architects upon the problem of estimat- 
ing by contractors under the present 
methods, states that members of the 
Chapter investigated the office work of 
five representative contractors. They 
found that the average number of con- 
tracts estimated by each contractor in 
one year was twenty-two, the average 
number of jobs which he obtained from 
these estimates was ten. The average 
value of the time spent by the office force 
of each firm on each estimate, including 
additions by sub-contractors and mate- 
rial men, was $503. The report points 
out that the cost of six bids on a build- 
ing costing between $100,000 and $150,- 
000 ran to over $3,000, that is, between 2 
and 3 per cent of the whole cost of the 
work. Perhaps in no other business to- 
day is so much unproductive work done 
at so high a cost. 



Seattle Bricks Rejected 

Fifteen thousand bricks, shipped to 
San Francisco from Seattle for the pav- 
ing of Third street, have been rejected 
by the Board of Public Works, on the 
ground that they were not up to specifi- 
cations. They were an old style brick, 
which, it is claimed, will not allow 
cement to run between them and hold 
them together. 



Manual Training and 
Domestic Science 

Furniture and Equipment 

c 




Agents for 

The Well-known SHELDON Line 

Laboratory Furniture 
School Desks and Supplies 
Manufacturers of the cele- 
brated ^^Q^ffi Black- 
board 

C. F. Weber & Co. 



365 Market St., 
SAN FRANCISCO 



312 So. Broadway 

LOS ANGELES 



Safe Loads on Footings 

A good method of deciding the safe 
load on footings is given in the following 
formulae: — ■ 

Divide the total load in pounds by the 
safe load in pounds per square foot; the 
quotient is the required area in square 
feet. The following values for the bear- 
ing power of soils given by Prof. Ira O. 
Baker, have been generally accepted. 

Bearing power 
in tons per sq. ft. 
Nature of the Soil Min. Max. 

Roclc — the hardest in thick layers, (in 

native bed) 200 

Rock — equal to best ashlar masonry.... 25 30 

Rock — equal to best brick masonry.... 15 20 

Rock— equal to poor brick masonry 5 10 

Clay — on thick beds, always dry 4 6 

Clay — on thick beds, moderately dry. . . 2 4 

Clay— soft 1 2 

Gravel — and coarse sand, well cemented 8 10 

Sand — compact and well cemented 4 6 

Sand — clean dry 2 4 

Quicksand— alluvial soils, etc 0.5 1 



DIECKMANN HARDWOOD CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

350 to 398 BEACH STREET, COR. TAYLOR 
CARRY A LARGE WELL ASSORTED STOCK OF 

HARDWOODS 

AND SOLICIT YOUR INQUIRIES. 



The Architect and Engineer 



129 



Even Old Boreas 
Gives It Up! 







Our Roofing Tin proves its 
true worth when tested by 
storm. Old Boreas, travel- 
ing through space at sixty 
miles an hour, is prone to 
sweep every roof in his path 
unless it is made of 







^\ Copper Bearing Open Hearth 

ROOFING TIN 

manufactured exclusively by 
this Company. Send for book- 
let "Copper — Its Effect Upon 
Steel for Roofing Tin." 
Every architect, roofer and 
builder should read it. 



Copper Bearing Open Hearth Roofing Tin bears the stamp " C. B. Open 
Hearth " in addition to brand and weight of coating. We also manu- 
facture Keystone Copper Bearing Sheets, both Black and Galvanized. 



Ameim Sheet MlinPyeCompaw 

■ * General Offices: RickBirildmg.Pittsbuigli.Pa. 

— District Sales Offices = 

Chicago Cincinnati Denver Detroit New Orleans New York Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh St. Louis 

Export Representatives: U. S. Steel Products Company. New York City 

Pac. Coast Representatives: U. S. Steel Products Co.. San Francisco. Los Angeles. Portland, Seattle 



130 TIic Architect and Engineer 

RANSOME CONCRETE COMPANY 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

1012-1014 EIGHTH STREET, 1218 BROADWAY, 

SACRAMENTO, CAL. OAKLAND, CAL. 

LESTER H. STOCK 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

A. DUSENBERRY 12 QEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Mgr. Construction Phone Douglas 4596 

Phone Douglas 3224 

HUrSTER <S? MUDSOIN, Engineers 

Designers of Heating, Ventilating and Wiring Systems. 

Mechanical and Electrical Equipment of Buildings. 
73Q Rialto Bldg. San Francisco, Cal. 

LIGHTING HEATING PLUMBING 

Good Work and Prompt Service. C[No Job too small — none too bi^ 
Three Departments and the> are alwavs at your service. Gei 

CENTRAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 



E. K. WOOD LUMBER CO. 

QEO. B. WADDELL, Manager 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LITMBER MILL WORK and MOULDINGS 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF PROMPT RAIL SHIPMENT 

Office, Yards and Wharves 
„.„ lMerrittlI2 FREDERICK & KINQ STREETS 

pnones) Home B 1127 East Oakland, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA GRANITE COMPANY 

Phone Sutter 2646 STONE CONTRACTORS 

San Francisco Office. 518 Sharon Bldg. Main Office. Rocklin, Placer Co., Cal. 

Quarries. Rocklin and Porterville Telephone Main 82 

SAAASOIN SPOT SASH CORD 



We Guarantee Good Work and Prompt Service. ^No Job too small — none too big. We Employ 
Experts in all Three Departments and the> are always at your service. Get Our Figure. 




Tradf Ma 

(iuaranteed free from all imperfections ol braid or finish. Can alwavs be disniii.'uished bv our trade 
mark, the spots on the cord. Send for samples, tests, etc SAMSON CORDAGE WORKS. BOSTON. MASS 
Pacific Coast .^uent. JOHN T. ROWNTREE, 875 Monadnock BIda., San Francisco. Cal.. and 701 Hlujirs Blilj.. los Angeles. Cal. 



Massachusetts Bonding and Insurance Company 

621 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO TELEPHONE SUTTER 2750 

The Very^Be st Place BONDS AND CASUALTY INSURANCE 
Satisfaction Guaranteed ROBERTSON & HALL, Managers No Red Tape 



The Architect and Engineer 



131 




I'JEW uf rt.lXr l.\ SOCIHERX CT.-iH 



Some Notes on Keene Cement 

Bv I. M. BICKEL* 



OXE of the hitherto unsolved prob- 
lems which has engaged the thought 
and attention of our leading architects 
throughout the world has been the ques- 
tion of finding a perfect material for 
plastering, wainscoting and decorating 
the inside walls of otherwise good, sub- 
stantial residences and public buildings. 
The demand for such a product has now 
been fully met in the production of 
Bickel's .American Keene Cement, which is 
being extensively specified and used by 
many of the best architects throughout the 
country. 

After years of experimenting, the 
writer has succeeded in making a 
Keene cement that combines chemic- 
ally with lime putty in such a way as 
to harden the lime. When used in 
the proportion of one-fourth or one- 
fifth of Bickel's .American Keene 
Cement (Basic brand) with three- 
fourths or four-fifths of lime putty, 
together with the customary amount 
of sand, it makes a wall much 
harder and more satisfactory than 
any of the ordinary g\-psum hard- 
wall plasters. The mortar can be 
used any time within sixty hours 
after it is mixed. .\11 the droppings 
can be retempered and used. It sets 
slowly and hardens slowly and does 
not corrode metal laths or studdings. 
It contains no organic matter and 
consequently has no bad odor. Xeitlur 
does it deteriorate in stock, but can 
be kept for j-ears without injury. 
When used in accordance to manu- 
facturers specifications, under present 
trade conditions, the cost of a high- 
class Keene cement wall is no more 
than an ordinary hardwall plaster job. 

Unlike other liardwall plasters. 



*Mr. Bickel has been at the head of the 
-American Keene Cement Company since its 
organization and has. with great care, worked 
out all the scientific principles involved in the 
production of high-grade Keene cement. 



walls plastered with lime and Bickel's 
Basic Fine, .American Keene Cement keep 
getting harder for si,\ months or more 
after applied to the walls. The walls 
finally get as hard as marble, but during 
the setting and hardening process it has 
elasticity enough to prevent crazing or 
cracking. 

Rooms plastered with this product are 
free from sounds and echoes that char- 
acterize rooms plastered with ordinary 
hardwall plaster. The acoustic proper- 
ties in all buildings using this material 




MR. J. .1/. BICKEL 



132 



The Architect and Engineer 



are perfect, thus making its 
use most desirable in school- 
rooms, courthouses, theaters, 
churches, and in fact, all 
classes of buildings. 

The Superfine brand for 
wainscoting, finishing, kitchen 
and bathroom work is unex- 
celled. Many of the best 
buildings in the Pacific Coast 
cities and throughout the 
country generally, finished in 
this material, bear testimony to 
its superiority. 

Bickel's American Keene 
Cement, e.xtra superfine and 
coarse brands for Scagliola 
and Imitation Marble has 
long been in great favor with 
artisans doing this class of 
work. 



This company has a com- SHATTUCK 
modious mill in Southern Utah on the 
D. & R. G. Railroad, adjacent to an 
extensive deposit of over two thousand 
acres of superior quality of Alabaster, 
aggregating over ten million tons. The 
mill is constructed of reinforced con- 
crete, with steel trusses and steel roof, 
three hundred feet long, equipped with 
first-class machinery throughout, and has 
a capacity for making one hundred tons 
of Keene cement per day. 

The mill has a thoroughly equipped 
laboratory in which the chemicals used 
in the manufacture of Bickel's Cement 
are prepared. These chemicals consist 




HOTEL. Berkeley. Bickcl s Kceitc Cement Used 

of commercial minerals suitably treated 
and compounded. This proposition has 
been worked out on scientific lines, 
conforming scrupulously to the natural 
laws indicated in the compounding of 
materials that results in the best cement 
that can be produced with sulphate of 
lime as a base, commercially known as 
Keene cement. 

The company has a well-established 
trade in all the Pacific Coast and inter- 
mountain States and has also a consider- 
able trade in Atlantic seabord and Miss- 
issippi Vallej' cities. 



Oil Safety and Saving 

for Your Clients 

When planning a home, power plant, store or any 
building, remember that Bowser Storage Systems 
mean safety and saving in the storing and handling of 
Gasolene and oils of all kinds. 

Safe 

Oil Storage 

Systems 

Outfit keeps all the "Gas" in Saso- 
jnderground. Keeps the power in 
) space in the garage — makes the 





In the Garage 



In Factories 



Bov 



ake : 



ser Syste 
cally me 
1 thrifty 
tidy— cut 



Qs save oil. keep it clean, auto- 
sure without containers, save 
nd efficient in the handling of 
down oil cost. Economy and 



For the Factory 



floor spacet 

oils. Keep prem 

utility all "round. 

Bowser information for the architect 
request. No charge— no obligation. V 

S. F. Bowser & Company, Inc. 

Engineen, Manafactaren and Origioal Patentees 
of Oil Handlini Devices 

3Q173 Thomas St., Fort Wayne, Indiana 
612 Howard St., San Francisco, CaL 

Telephone — Douglas 4.^2,^ 



The .Ircliiffct ami Eiigiiiccr 133 

A Trigk Any Painter Can Do" 
c6ngretoU^^ 

f - 501.EMFRS. I ''"• " " " '•■' 

L&£|'MuRALd)CO; 

:JNEWYDRXf 

betbro Concn?iCute,U5^..,i.,. "**'"'' Con.-rcio I5 Used 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

THE MURALO CO., New York 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 311 California Street 

A. L. GREENE, Agent 




DISTRIBUTORS 

Sunset Paint Co. D. H. Rhodes 

627 S Main Street 546 Valencia St. 

Los Angeles San Francisco 



PACIFIC LIMITED 

OGDEN ROUTE 

Observation Car Standard Pullman Drawing Room 
and Tourift Sleeping Cars 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 10:20 A.M. 
From Oakland, 16th St. Station 10:55 A. M. 

Chicago in 69 Hours 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazii 



134 



The Architect and Engmcer 




V Jim Sim iMncilhmmM Co. 



nil iiii 



'^TslYJ.r.'t^rll Ice Making . RetriSeratiniS 



VACUUM SWEEPING SYSTEM 




Co-Operation and the Jarvis Oil Burner Company 



ANY one wlio could have been present 
at the annual Christmas dinner given 
by the T. P. Jarvis Crude Oil Burning 
Company to its staff of workers on the 
afternoon of December 24th last, would 
understand the force of the above head- 
ing. It was the seventh event of its 
kind, having become an annual afifair 
with a little something added each year. 
Everyone connected with the organiza- 
tion seems to think and act as if every- 
thing would go all wrong if he (or she) 
did not do their level best. The organ- 
ization works along lines defined by 
Webster as "Working jointly to the 
same end," coupled, perhaps, with the 
latest Elbert Hubbard definition of the 
same word, "Doing what I tell j'ou to do, 

and doing it d m quick." 

Everyone present was called upon to 
say something, and the responses were 
replete with Christmas cheer and well 
wishes for Mr. Jarvis and his associates. 
Mr. Jarvis outlined very clearly the past, 
present, and future policies of the com- 
pany, and in the main they were plans 
of expansion and advanceinent in the 
manufacture of oil burners, vacuum 
plants and ice machines. He emphasized 
the fact of home manufacture, every- 
thing used being made in San Francisco, 
except the motors. This is worthy of 



the highest consideration for manj' rea- 
sons. 

One employe in his remarks, argued 
that climatic conditions always played 
into the hands of the company, since 
cold weather called for more oil burners, 
and hot weather created a market for ice 
machines. 

A significant fact, demonstrating the 
growth of the plant, was brought out in 
Mr. Jarvis' talk by his statement that 
the present pay roll is twenty times 
greater per annum than it was nine j'ears 
ago. 

One of the very convenient and effi- 
cient installations of the Jarvis Companj' 
is a combination oil burner and vacuum 
cleaner, set up complete as one machine 
and operated by the same motor. 

Mr. Jarvis has several live agents in 
the interior of the State, and they are 
kept busy selling and installing new 
plants. 

A very credita1)le list of oil Imrner in- 
stallations made by this compan}' fol- 
lows: 

Inside Inn Hotel, P.-P. I. E. Fair Grounds. 

Plaza Hotel. San Francisco. 

Bnrlingame Country Club. Burlingame. Cai. 

Cartwright Hotel. San Francisco. Cal. 

Tait-Zinkand Cafe. San Francisco, Cal. 

Olympic Club. San Francisco ,Ca1. 

Archbishop Riordan Residence, San Francisco. 

L. E. Hanchett Residence, San Francisco, and 
the following, all in San Francisco: 



A. C. SCHINDLEK. Preside 



CHAS. F, STAUFFACHER. Secretary 



THE RIINK dt SCMIINDLER CO. 

Manufacturers of INTERIOR WOODWORK AND FIXTURES 

BANK, OFFICE AND STORE FITTINGS 

SPECIAL FURNITURE 

218-228 THIRTEENTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Bet. Mission and Howard Sts, Telephones: Market 22.=.\ Home M225I 



The Architect and Engineer 



135 



Imperial Water Proofing 



THE 

Scientific 
Practical 

AND 

Economical 

WATER 
PROOFING 










FOR 

CONCRETE 
BRICK 
STONE 

AND 

STUCCO 
WALLS 



Tl iiW ' J ! " -— -<TOt'»vf,j-.j-rt«» '>Trrt_- - y-i: — ^^■ 









?*^ 



T'f'm^-'^Y^ 



^ ^ 3. ,a j^isn, 



SAN FRANCISCO CITY HALL, BAKEWELL & BROWN. ArchiiL^i-^ 

For this important structure Imperial Waterproofing is being used by the McGilvray 
Stone Co., for treating the beds and builds of all granite and stone work, by a surface 
application, to prevent the staining caused by cement mortar. 

WE SPECIALIZE 

WATER PROOFING PROBLEMS 



ABOVE GROUND 



UNDER GROUND 



ASSUME ALL RESPONSIBILITY 
GUARANTEE RESULTS 



IMPERIAL COMPANY 

Builders' Exchange Building 
183 Stevenson Street San Francisco, Cal. 



When writing to Advertisers pie 



Current Prices of Building Materials 

These quotations furnished by reliable San Francisco 
and Los Angeles dealers 

(Names and addresses will be supplied upon request.) 



SAN FRANCISCO PRICES 

Common Red Brick, S7 , 50 per M, ex. cars. 

No. 1 Pressed Brick. $35.00 to $40.00 per M; Wire cut. 

$35.00 per M. 
No. 1 Red Pressed Brick. $20.00 to $30.00 per M. 
Red Stock Brick. $14.00 per M. 
California Portland Cement, C/L $2 .30 per bbl.; L.C.L. 

$2.55 per bbl. 
White Cement: Atlas. $6.00; Medusa. $6.00 per bbl. 
Sand and Gravel mixed. 70c per ton, F. O. B. cars. 
Sand (washed, screened liver sand) 75c per ton, F.O.B. 

cars. 
Bank Sand, $1 .00 per cu. yd. 
Roofing Gravel, $1.40 per ton. 
Crushed Rock or Gravel, 7Sc per ton. 
Red Roofing Tile, $22.00 to $25.00 per square, laid. 
Brick Lime. $1.35 per bbl.. C/L. 
Finish Lime. $1.50 per bbl.. C/L. 
Hardwall Gypsum Plaster. $11.00 per ton, carload; 

11.50 per ton, ex. warehouse. 
Oregon Pine. Rough Common. 1 x 3 to 1 x 10. $14.00. 
Oregon Pine. Rough. 2 x 3 to 2- 12. $15.00. 
Oregon Pine 1 x 4 T. & G. Flooring, No. 1, $31 per M; 

No. 2, $28; No. 3, $26. 
Oregon Pine T. & G. Ceiling, No. 1 and 2 mixed, $26 

to $28 . 
Redwood, Rough Common, 1x4 and up, $20.00. 
Redwood, Rough Common, 2 x 3 to 2 x 10, $20.00 to 

$22 00. 
Redwood Rustic. No. 1. $35.00; No. 2. $32.00. 
Redwood Ceiling. No. 1. $29.00; No. 2. $26.00. 
Redwood Shingles. No. 1. $2.45 full count. 
Red Cedar Shingles. Star-A-Star. $2.60 full count. 
Pine Lath. $2 .40 per M. 

Metal Lath. 13 to 25c per yd., accordmg to quality. 
1 X 3 Oak Flooring. Q. S. Clear. $120.00 per M; Select. 

$80.00perM. 
Yi X 2!-2 Oak Flooring. Q. S. Clear. $96.00 per M; 

Select. $74.00 per M. 
1 X 3 Maple Flooring Clear. $75 .00 per M; Clear White, 

$105.00 per M. 
White Lead in Oil, 8Kc per lb. 
Dry Red Lead. 8c per lb. 

Boiled Linseed Oil. 63c gal. Raw Linseed Oil. 61c gal. 
Turpentine, per gallon. 63 to 70c in bbls. 
Dry Shellac. 35c per lb., variable. 
Hyloplate Blackboard, 25 to 35c per foot, mstalled. 
Composition Flooring, 25 to 30c per foot, laid. 
Genuine Slate Blackboards, 40 to 50o per foot, erected. 

LOS ANQELES PRICES 

Common Red Brick, No. 2, $4.50 per M. 

Clinker Brick. $9.00 per M. 

Pressed Brick. $35.00 per M. 

Enameled Brick. $65,00 per M. 

Red Roofing Tile. $12.00 and $15.00 per square (not 

laid). 
White Cement. $6.00 per bbl. 
Portland Cement. $2 . 30 per bbl. 
Lime, $1.50 to $1.75 per bbl. 
Hardwall Plaster, per ton, $9.90 ex. whse. 
Oregon Pine, Rough Common, 1 x 3 up. $19.00 to 

$22.00 per M. 
Oregon Pine. Rough Common. 2 x 3 up. $17.00 to 

$21 .00 per M. 
Oregon Pine Flooring. 1 x 4. No. 1. $40.00; No. 2, 

$35.00; No. 3. $22, 50 per M. 
Oregon Pine Ceiling. 1x4. No. 1. $36,00; No. 2. $31 .00. 
Redwood. Rough Common,' $20,00 to $24,00. 



Redwood Rustic, No. 1, $3,S.00; No. 2, $33.00 per M. 
Redwood Ceiling, 

per M. 
Redwood Shingles 
$1 . 75. 

4 bdls. to M, Star-A-Star, $2 . 75. 
4 ft., $3.25 per M; 1^ in.x 4 ft.. 



1. $33.00; No. 2, $28.00 
4 bdls. to M. No. 1, $2.25; No. 2, 



Red Cedar Shingl 
Pine Lath. 1 V2 in 
$3.65 per M. 
White Lead in Oil, 8,!.2C per lb. 
Red Lead. dry. 8)30 per lb. 
Raw Linseed Oil. bbls., 65c gallon. 
Boiled Linseed Oil, bbls.. 6Sc gallon. 
Turpentine, bbls., 63 to 70c. gallon. 
Crushed Rock and Gravel, $1 . 65 per yard. 
Sand, 8Sc per yard. 

SACRAMENTO PRICES 

Common Brick, $7.00 per M, C/L. 

Pressed Brick, Wire Cut, $30.00 per M, C/L. 

Portland Cement, $2 . 40 per bbl. carloads. 

Crushed Rock and Gravel, 65c per ton, ex. cars. 

Sand. $1.00 yd. on cars. 

Roofing Gravel. $1 . 50 per ton. 

Lime. $1.35 bbl. 

Hardwall Plaster. $13.00 per ton. ex. whse. 

STOCKTON PRICES 

Common Brick. $7.75 per M. del. 

Face Brick. Wire Cut, $31 .00 per M C/L. 

Cement. $2,40 per bbl., C/L. 

Crushed Rock and Gravel, 90c ton. 

Sand. 90c. 

Roofing Gravel. $1 . 50 per ton. 

Lime. $1.35. 

Hardwall Plaster. $13.00 ex. whse. per ton. 

FRESNO PRICES 

Common Brick. $9.50 per M. del. 

Face Brick. Wire Cut, $35 .00 per M. C/L. 

Cement, $2.84 per bbl.. C/L. 

Crushed Rock and Gravel. SI .35 per ton. 

Black Face Brick. $25,00 per M— F. O. B. 

Sand. $1 .00 per yd., del. 

Roofing Gravel. $1 . 85 per ton. 

Lime, $1.50 bbl. 

Hardwall Plaster, $14.00 per ton, ex. whse. 

BAKERSFIELD PRICES 

Common Brick, $9 ,00 per M, del. 

Face Brick, Wire Cut, $37.00 per M, C/L. 

Cement. $2.77 per bbl.. C/L. 

Crushed Rock and Gravel. $1 , 80 per ton. 

Sand. $1,00 per yd., del. 

Roofing Gravel. $2 , 00 per ton. 

Lime. $1.50 per bbl. 

Hardwall Plaster. $15.00 per ton. ex. whse. 

CHICO PRICES 

Common Brick, $11.00 per M. del. 

Face Brick, Wire Cut, $35 .00 per M, C/L. 

Cement, $2.65 per bbl. 

Crushed Rock and Gravel, 85 to 90c per ton, C/L. 

Sand, $1 .00 per yard. 

Roofing Gravel, $1.50 per ton. 

Lime, $1.40 bbl. 

Hardwall Plaster. $14.00 per ton. ex. whse. 



The Architect and Ens'inecr 



137 



Robert W. hunt 



jNO. J. Cone 



JAS. c. hallsted 



D. W. MCNAUGHER 



ROBERT W. HUNT & CO., Engineers 

BUREAU OF INSPECTION TESTS AND CONSULTATION 

251 KEARNY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

New Yohk London Chicaoo Pittsburgh St. Louis Seattle Toronto Mexico City 

CEMENT INSPECTION 

INSPECTION OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL 

REPORTS AND ESTIMATES ON PROPERTIES AND PROCESSES 

CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL TESTING LABORATORIES 



CaL 



Cal. 



Cal. 



Union League Club. Cowcll Cement Building 
Alhambra Hotel. Halcyon .\partments, Montevists 
Apartments, Monteclaire .\partments, M'ary Eliza 
beth Inn. Talbort Estate Building, Uunloe .\part 
ments, S. F. Armory, Marsicano .Apartments 
Emery Building. Kincannon Building, three build 
ings for Reite. Bryn Mawr .\partments. .Vvondal< 
Apartments, Golden Poppy, Sunset Caffeteria. 

Braemar .\partments. Berkeley, Cal. 

Europa Bakery. Oakland, Cal. 

Nottingham .-Vpartments, San Francisco, 

Auburn Hotel, .\uburn. Cal. 

Duboce Apartments. San Francisco, Cal 

California Dairy Kitchen. San Francisc< 

Sherwood Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Patterson School, Patterson, Cal. 

Corcoran School. Corcoran. Cal. 

Gustine School, Gustine, Cal. 

Orland School. Orland. Cal. 

Armijo School. Fairfield. Cal. 

Willows School. Willows. Cal. 

Vacaville School. Vacaville. Cal. 

Burlingame Grammar School. Burlingam 

Lindsay School. Fresno. Cal. 

Leader Bakery. Salinas. Cal. 

Eureka High School, Eureka, Cal. 

Yreka Court House, Yreka, Cal. 

Yreka Hospital, Yreka, Cal. 

Vir^ian Apartments, Sacramento, Cal. 

Bellevue Apartments. Simmona .'Vpartments, 
Mulligan Apartments. Sockolov Building, S. Mor- 
ris Building, StofF Building, L. Lee .\partments, 
Roberts Apartments. Lundy ^^partments, Burnett 
Apartments, San Francisco. 

Marconi Wireless Stations, Marshall and Bo- 
linas. 

Keenan Apartments. San Francisco; Fort Win- 
field Scott. San Francisco. 

Steamers City of Para, Newport, Governor, 
ngress. 

ecent installations of combination 
nd oil burner equipments: Hotel 
Senate Hotel. San Fran- 
Apartments. San Francisco; Glen- 
arm .Apartments. San Francisco; .-\rmijo School, 
Fairfield. Cal.; Ellis Hotel, San Francisco; Hamp- 
shirearms .Apartments, San Francisco,; Weber 
School, Stockton, Cal. 






Eastern Writer Scores the Mazda 
Lamp 

Mr. F. Laurent Godinez. a lighting 
expert, has an article in "Architecture 
and Building" that deserves to be read 
by men who believe in the conserva- 
tion of human eye-sight. Mr. Godinez 
heads his article — which is the first of 
a series — -"In the Glare." 

"Indirect lighting, like any other ap- 
plication of artificial light, has its field 
of usefulness, but it is not unlimited," 
he says. "Whenever the architect takes 
hold of the lighting problem, about once 
in every 10,000 applications, we find 
lighting which, if anything, is visually 



safe. Glaring spots of light Mot out 
pictorial expressions, just as splashes of 
white paint would destroy the effect of 
any fine painting. The architect knows 
this, but he is so beset and hounded by 
lighting salesmen, and so swamped and 
flooded with lighting literature, and so 
obsessed with millions of other annoy- 
ances that the big 'little' detail of light- 
ing seldom gets the personal attention 
it deserves. Said a Jersey City architect 
who lighted a high school so that it is 
a menace to the eyesight of every stu- 
dent : 'I suppose it is bad, but the author- 
ities (politicians and Board of Educa- 
tion) want a lot of glare, or they don't 
think they're getting their money's 
worth.' This allusion refers, of course, 
to conditions which could, and can be 
improved by the architect himself, and 
such cases are by no means restricted 
to school buildings. The bigger the un- 
dertaking the more miserable the light- 
ing as a rule, and it is apropos to add 
that the new station of the New York 
Central Railroad, with its crude expo- 
sure of glaring bulbs in the approaches 
is no exception, excepting as a tribute 
to the stupidity of the illuminating engi- 
neer, and his ignorance of even the 
fundamental principles of physiologic 
lighting. 

"But hovi^ about the condition which 
cannot be regulated by the architect.' 
Millions of people ride in the subway 
and suburban trains, twice daily. The 
'uneconomic' electric bulbs of the carbon 
type, have been replaced by 'high effi- 
ciency' mazda lamps, 'giving three times 
the light' (according to advertisements 
in the S cent weeklies) but with two 
hundred times the glare! (not mentioned 
in advertisements). These lamps are so 
glaring and dangerous to the eye that 
their e.xposure in the form of bare bulbs 
should be prohibited by law. Every 
architect is interested in getting facts, 
free from the graceful coloring of those 
subsidized writers who abound so plen- 
tifully nowadays and whose writings are 
a part of the advertising section. The 
question is one of Eyesight vs. Glaring 
Lights, and the issue is the eyesight of 
the next generation." 



138 The Architect and Engineer 



HEATING 

VENTILATION 

243 MINNA 


Automatic Sprinkler 

FLOOR AND WALL 

SCOTT CO 

SUCCESSOR TO JOHN G. 
STREET 


Systems 

TILING ^*^^" 

., llMC. 

SUTTON CO. 

SAN 


PLUMBING 

METAL WORK 

FRANCISCO 



O. BAMAXX, President ERNEST HELD. Vice-President 

HOME MANUFACTURING CO. 

BANK, STORE AND OFFICE FITTINGS 

FURNITURE AND HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

CABINET WORK OF EVERY' DESCRIPTION 

543 and 545 BRANNAN ST. phone Keamy isu San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC GURNEY ELEVATOR CO. 

GURNEY TYPE TRACTION ELEVATORS 

All Types Double and Single Worm Gear Freight and Passenger Elevators 

186 Fifth Street San Francisco, Cal. 



TT A '^^¥ ^^O O i^f\ Telephone Alameda 3100 

* ** •*■ ■•-•V-'lX iX. Vi^V^* SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 

EST..\BL1SHED IN lS<jO 315-317 Sharon Building 

f I_ »ifll 1 c 1 1 l-v Telephone Sutter 1170 

Lumber, Millwork, bash and Doors Oakland office 

2001 Grand Street, Alameda, Cal. Telephone Oakland 2991 



PHONE SUTTER 1533 

FOSTER VOGT CO. 

Contractors 

CONCRETE FIRE PROOFING ANTD GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 
Sharon Building San Francisco, Cal. 



FREDERICK J. AMWEG Advisory Engmee^^and Manager of BuHdlng 

CIVIL ENGINEER 

Member American Soc. Civil Eng. ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^.^^^^ ^^^ 



PORTLAND SAN FRANCISCO SEATTL 

Sound Construction and Engineering Co. 

Incorporated 

J. T. WALSH, Engr. and Mgr. 

HEARST BUILDINQ, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SLIDING DOOR HANGERS 

FOR ALL CONDITIONS 
THE McCABE HANGER MANUFACTURING CO., NEW YORK 



The Architect and Eu'^inecr 



139 




Multi-Stage Turbine House Pump 
General Offices and Factory 

CHICAGO PUMP COAIPANY 

901 \V. Lake Street, Chicago. III. 



Specify "Chicago" 

Multi-Slage Turbine House Pumps 
Single & Duplex Electric Sewage Ejectors 
Automatic Electric Bilge Pumps 
•Little Giant" Electric Cellar Drainers 
Poeumatic Water Supply Systems 
^^1^ Electric House Service Pumps 

A COMPLETE AND WELL DESIGNED LINE 
Pacific Coast Agents 

TELEPHONE ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT CO. 

612 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Concrete Hardener Insures a Perfect 
Concrete Floor 

The recognition of concrete as a per- 
manent building material is so well es- 
tablished and its constantly increasing 
use is so apparent to the casual observer, 
it is not surprising, therefore, that the 
increased field for Portland cement has 
been anticipated in many ways. In order 
to give the subject proper and worthy 
attention, it is noted that a number of 
iirms and individuals are specializing in 
the use of cement and its kindred ma- 
terials. 

E. A. Bullis & Company of San Fran- 
cisco are among the first to specialize 
in materials for cement and include in 
their line Hardeners. Surfacing. Dry 
Mortar Colors. Waterproofing, etc. .\\\ 
these things are desirable and quite nec- 
essary under certain conditions. 

For instance, regarding the hardener, 
it might be mentioned that the floors 
of a modern industrial plant, these stren- 
uous days. are. or should be. among the 
most seriously discussed and planned 
problems before the architects or owner. 
The larger the output of the factory or 
the more business transacted inside the 
building, the more wear and tear the 
floor is subjected to, and the service and 
traffic it is called upon to withstand is 
very much greater than any other part 
of the structure. However, there has 
been of late a growing tendency on the 
part of architects and engineers to pro- 
vide a floor surface designed to suit the 
requirements; and along with the floor 
problems comes the specialist who deals 
with iust such cases, with the result that 
the time-defying properties of concrete 
are combined with the wear-defying ce- 
ment hardeners — the two combined mak- 
ing a unit of great improvement. 

So much has been said and written in 
favor of concrete floors in preference to 
wood that nothing remains of the prob- 
lem except to make these concrete floors 
hard enough to withstand the traffic and 
render them sanitary, dustproof and 
waterproof. The pores in concrete are 



The B. & W. Stationary 
Vacuum Cleaner 

For Bungalows and Moderate Sized Houses 
PRICE $100.00 INSTALLED 

High efEciency and costs less than 3c per hour 
to operate. Made in San Francisco. 

For demonstration see 

ARTHUR T. RIGQS 

510 Claus Spreckels BIdg., Sao Francisco 

PHONE G.\RFIELD 7189 



MacKenzie Roof Co. 



[\T4acken^ie?| 



425 15th St.. OaKland 

FHone OaKlarvd 34-61 



W.W. BREITE, C. E. 

Structural Engineer 

Designs and Details of 

ALL CLASSES OF 
METALLIC STRUCTURES 



SAX FR.\NCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Whe 



vriting to Advertisers please mention this magazi 



140 



The Architect and Eut'i. 



there by virtue of the materials that go 
into the making. Concrete will always be 
porous, will always granulate and have 
a tendency to crumble and break down 
under severe loads or constant wear. It 
is to overcome this that the specialist 
is called in and the floor is properly 
improved to meet the conditions. 

In cases where it is desired to design 
a hard, tough floor of cement mortar, 
the use of Federal Steel Cement Hard- 
ener is suggested by these specialists. 
This is a finely ground metallic material 
composed principally of iron dust. The 
compound when mi.xed into the mortar 
oxidizes and expands, filling up and seal- 
ing the pores and increasing the tensile 
strength to a degree wdiich makes tlie 
floor possible to hold up under severe 
wearing conditions. The following test 
supporting this claim for increased ten- 
sile strength was made in the testing 
laboratories of Messrs. Crowell & Mur- 
ray, Cleveland, Ohio. This report is as 
follows: 

Cleveland, Ohio, June 18, 1914. 
The Federal Steel Cement Mills, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gentlemen: — We give you herewith 
the results of the physical test on a mix- 
ture of standard cement, sand and your 
concrete hardener. 

A mixture of standard cement and 
sand in the proportion of 
100 lbs. cement 
200 lbs. sand 
was made into briquets. At the end of 
7 days these briquets showed a tensile 
strength of 262 pounds. At the end of 
28 days they showed a tensile strength 
of 342 pounds. 

A mixture was then made of 
100 lbs. standard cement 
200 lbs. sand 

5 lbs. of the concrete hardener 

At the end of 7 days these briquets 
showed a tensile strength of 407 pounds, 
and at the end of 28 days a tensile 
strength of 546 pounds. 

(Signed) Crowell & Murray. 

This represents an increase in the ten- 
sile strength of 55 per cent for the seven 
day period and 59 per ce(nt for the 
twenty-eight day period. It is the ad- 
vent of such materials as this hardener 
which have called the specialists into 
existence, who in turn have succeeded 
in perfecting concrete by employing va- 
rious treatments adapted to the condi- 
tions required. 



Personal 

Charles R. Meyers of Xew York, arch- 
itect for the Xew York State Building 
at the Panama-Pacific Exoosition, is in 
San Francisco, and is making his head- 
quarters at the St. Francis Hotel. Mey- 
ers has prepared plans for a number of 
exhibit booths to be erected in the Pal- 
ace of Education and Palace of Mines 
and Metals for various Eastern concerns. 



The First and Last Word in 
Fireproof Doors and Trim 



^Vhen the cave man first rolled a 
boulder in front of the entrance to his 
cave the first door was invented. 

That door, crude as it was, pos- 
sessed one virtue that the doors of 
civilized man did not possess up to the 
Twentieth Centurv — IT WAS FIRE- 
PROOF. 

During the early part of the Twen- 
tieth Century man began to realize 
that the chief purpose of any door 
should be to oppose fire, man's greatest 
natural enemy. 

This realization resulted in the in- 
vention and development of the Dahl- 
strom Products — the last word in 
fireproof doors and trim. 

The Dahlstrom Products, which 
consist of hollow metal doors, windows, 
partitions, and all interior trim, possess 
not only the fireproof virtue of the 
cave man's door but they represent the 
utmost perfection in quality, finish, 
durability, sanitation, and withal are 
artistic and esthetic. 

They embody all the virtues and 
none of the objectionable features of 
the so-called fire-retarding doors and 
other makeshifts. 

The Dahlstrom plant is one of the 
most completely equipped in the World 
and can produce any design of door 
and trim in hollow metal to meet the 
requirements of the most fastidious. 

Dahlstrom Service is synonymous 
with absolute satisfaction. Dahlstrom 
Quality is unequalled. Proof if you 
familiarize yourself. 

DAHLSTROM METALLIC 
DOOR COMPANY 

E.xecutive Offices and 




34 Blackstone Avenue 
JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 



M. G. WEST COMPANY 
353 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

Drawings and Estimates Furnished 



.\dv 



r5 pie 



thir 



The Architect and Engineer 



141 



Beink Interiors 

H. H. Winner, for six years Pacific 
Coast manager for Weary & Alford. spe- 
cialists in bank interior work, has severed 
his connection with that firm, and has 
established himself in the Nevada Bank 
Building, San PVancisco, as the H. H. 
Winner Company, designers of bank in- 
teriors of the higher class. Mr. Winner 
has also reorganized the American Fix- 
ture Company and this concern will seek 
business in cabinet and fixture work. Mr. 
Winner has many friends in San Fran- 
cisco and throughout the bay region. 
His native home is Ross, Marin county. 
Mr. Winner has recently completed plans 
for extensive alterations to the Bank of 
San Rafael. The entire building will be 
modernized and the banking rooms will 
be made to compare favorably with any 
of the big metropolitan banks. About 
$20,000 will be expended in the work. 

Among the notable contracts super- 
vised by Mr. Winner while Coast mana- 
ger for the Weary & Alford Company 
are the Wells Fargo Nevada Bank Build- 
ing. San Francisco, American National 
Bank, U. S. Grant Hotel, U. S. National 
Bank, all in San Diego; the Citizens Na- 
tional Bank in Riverside and the Union 
National Bank of Pasadena. 



& Tibbetts of San Francisco, as engi- 
neers for the county highway system, 
and on the assurance that plans will be 
ready by February 1st, decided to post- 
pone the proposed bond election for 
bridges, so that all propositions may be 
submitted at the same time. 



. Santa Barbara Highway System 

The Board of Supervisors of Santa 
Barbara has ratified the appointment, by 
the Highway Commission, of Haviland 



Standard Varnish Works at the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition 

The Standard Varnish Works, with a 
Pacific Coast branch at 113 Front street, 
San Francisco, will have a very unique 
display at the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion. They will not only show local 
woods finished with their products, but 
have secured woods from all over the 
world upon which will be displayed the 
results that can be obtained with Stan- 
dard varnishes, stains and enamels. Their 
Satinette, the famous white enamel, as 
well as Kleartone stains and Elastica, 
will 'be largely in evidence. They will 
also have a display of fosil gum from 
which varnishes are made. 

As an evidence of the popularity of 
Standard products it is estimated that 
fully ninety per cent of the varnishes 
and enamels used at the Fair are of this 
manufacture. Architects, painters and 
builders are extended an invitation to 
make this booth headquarters while vis- 
iting the Fair. From -an educational 
standpoint no architect should fail to 
visit this display. 



*^on Buprin 

Self Releasing Fire Exit Latches 




Safe E.xit a Uni' 



Pat. U. S. and Canada 
Approved by New York Board o£ Fire Underwriters 

Absolutely Reliable 
Safeguard Against Panic Disasters 

A Few Dollars Spent for Safe Exits Should be a 

Mental Relief 

AGENTS ON THE COAST 

W. H. STEELE Los Angeles, Cal. 

A. W. PIKE & CO San Francisco. Cal. 

A. J. CAPRON Portland, Ore. 

F. T. CROWE & CO Spokane. Wash. 

F. T. CROWE & CO Tacoma, Wash. 

F. T. CROWE & CO Seattle, Wash. 

WM. N. O'NEIL & CO Vancouver. B. C. 

Ask for Catalogue No. 12 Q 

VONNEGUT HARDWARE CO. 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTORS 

INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 
In "Sweet's Index," Pages 770-771 



vriting to Advertisers pie 



142 



The Architect and En^^incer 



America Excels in Bells and Chimes 

THE war in Europe has already taught 
a multitude of our people in this 
countrj' a very useful lesson, which could 
well be taken to heart by all. r^Iany prev- 
iously imported goods have become dis- 
placed by American made products and 
with astonishingly satisfactory results, 
demonstrating as perhaps no other con- 
dition would that American made prod- 
ucts are equal and in some respects, 
superior to those made abroad, and what 
is more effective to the welfare of our 
country is that the industries thus affected 
are and by right should be supported by 
our purchasing power, which advances our 
industrial condition as a nation. 

Arnong the manufacturing industries 
of this country there is one that is unique 
in its way and an art in itself — the manu- 
facture or founding of church chimes, 
peals and bells, an industry that appeals 
to the highest and noblest of our emo- 
tions and to which the artisans employed 
therein give their best thought, skill and 
energy. In this industry the McShane 
Bell Foundry Company of Baltimore, 
Maryland, ranks without a peer, as" their 
bells are patterned and proportioned in 
accordance with the principles embodied 
in the best-known foreign products. 

For many years American-made chimes 
have been modeled on lines where as 
little metal as possible has been used to 
produce the lowest pitch notes. It has 
remained for the McShane Company to 
reverse this tendency in an endeavor to 
have their chimes composed of bells of 
the fullest practicable weight of metal 
for the desired tones, more particularly 
for the bells composing the upper half 
of the chime, and their efforts have met 
with signal success. 

In many (and we might sa\-, practical- 
ly all other American-made chimes), the 
bells comprising the upper half of the 
chime sound as though they were pitched 
in the next upper octave, and appear 
shrill and uncouth in comparison with 
the lower half. This detriment has been 
overcome by the McShane foundrv to 



the great satisfaction and delight of the 
purchasers. 

While the fullest practicable weight 
has been patterned into the bells for the 
required notes, the tuning and tone- 
temperament have been equally predom- 
inant features, achieving a wonderful 
standard of excellence. The previous 
unpleasant effects resulting from a com- 
bination of rich lower tones with light, 
thin upper tones above the fourth or 
fifth bell, respectively, have been elimin- 
ated. The McShane Company has ob- 
tained an equalized tone of richness and 
smoothness that has astonished the most 
eminent and able judges of bell and 
chime tones. Their personal inspection 
of the company's facilities and scientific 
appliances for turning out the finest 
work possible in chimes and peals con- 
vinced them that better chimes can not 
be obtained anywhere. 

In the firm's new plant, just completed 
at Baltimore, all possible care has been 
exercised to install therein the best and 
most complete appliances, together with 
scientific instruments to assure the pro- 
duction of not only the highest quality, 
so far as materials used in the composi- 
tion are concerned, but what is more im- 
portant — the most perfect musical results 
that human thought, scientific research 
and skill can produce. 



Praise for Concrete Construction 

The recent fire in the factory of Thos. 
.\. Edison, Inc.. West Orange, X. J., 
proved a particularly severe test on the 
concrete buildings. The absolute fire 
proofness of the concrete construction 
and the error in not having used steel 
sash are confirmed in the following news- 
paper interview with Thos. A. Edison: 

"The big lesson of this fire has been the value 
of concrete construction. My buildings are gut- 
ted but there they stand, ready for refitting. One 
error revealed was in not using steel window 
sash and trim and wired glass that withstands 
great heat. We will certainly have to use that 
finish henceforth. My good friend. Henry Ford, 
tells me that all of his automobile factories have 
this steel trim and wired glass." 




THE BIG-AN-LiniE CONCRETE and MORTAR MIXER 



Big Output — Little Weight 
Big Profits —Uittle Cost 
Capacity 3S Cu. Vds. a Day 

All rounded surfaces — no corners for concrete to lodge in. 

Revolves on ball thrust bearing, hermetically sealed to 
prevent grit from working in. 

Equipped with levers for turning over and locking device 
to hold drum in place while mixing. 

EDWARD R. BACON COMPANY 

^ Pacific Coast Agents 

51-53 Minna St., San Francisco Tel. Sutter 1675 



When writing to Advertisers please mention thii 



The Architect and Eii^i)ieer 143 



riREX 



FIREPROOFS 

by 

Guido Blenio 

Process. 
White Process. 



Firex 

FIREPROOFS Sint 



Economical 



FIRE.TR-A.PS Effective 

^=^^===^==^===r Enduring 

Building Paper, Roofing and other 
Building Materials rendered Fire- 
proof with FIREX. 

Firex Fireproofing 

approved by the 
PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 



FIREX OTLINE FIREPROOF PAINTS 
cover 1,300,000 sq. yards of the interior of 
the six largest Palaces at the Panama-Pacific 
International Exposition. 

Firex Reduces Insurance 



Address ^ Itvll/A. V^\^« phone 
Merchants Exchange, S. F. Sutter 1640 

Factory — West Berkeley. 

When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



144 



The .1 reinfect and F.ui:;iiiccr 




AGRICULTURAL HALL. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
JOHN GALEN HOWARD, Architect 

TWO RECENT GRANITE JOBS 

or 

CALIFORNIA GRANITE COMPANY 

STONE CONTRACTORS 

San Francisco Office, 518 Sharon Bldg. Main Office, Rocklin, Placer Co., Cal. 

Telephone Sutter 2646 Telephone Main 82 

Quarries, Rocklin and Porterville 




OAKLAND AUDITORIUM. J.J. DONOVAN, Architect 



When writing to Advertisers pie 



The Architect and Engineer 



145 



Building a 
Reputation 

The architect who specifies mate- 
rials of Lasting Quality is building 
not only residences, courthouses and 
schools, but a reputation which will 
serve him through life better than 
any influence or patronage and be a 
priceless heritage to his children. 

Armco (American 
Ingot) Iron 

is such a material. Its unequaled pur- 
ity and evenness and the care which 
is e.xpended on every detail of its 
manufacture result in an unequaled 
resistence to the action of the ele- 
ments. 



In the form of Ro.i imig. 

Cornices, Conductor I'liic, \\ uiduw 
Frames, Metal Lath and Terne Plate, 
it has proven its genuine quality. 

ARMCO IRON 

Resists Rust 

THE AMERICAN ROLLING 
MILL COMPANY 




Company with the skill, intelligence 



I the highest degree 



Licensed Man- 
ufacturers under 
Patents granted 
to the Interna- 
tional Metal 
Products Com- 
pany. 



CALIFORNIA REPRESEXTATIVE: 

C. W. ARMES 

22 Battery Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Franfilin 1006 



Alex. Coleman 

CONTRACTING 
PLUMBER 



r06 Ellis Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




McCRAY 
REFRIGERATORS 

BUILT TO ORDER 

FOR 

Home, Restaurant, Hotel or Club 

We Carry a Full Line ot Stock Sizes 

NATHAN DOHRMANN GO. 

Selling Agents 
Geaiy and Stockton Sts., San Francisco 




iiiirtiiMr-il^iriTriir- 
G. ROGNIER CEX CO. 

La^vn ana Garden Ornaments 

Artificial Stone Work. 

Benches. Vases, Sun Dials, etc. 

Designs Submitted 

233 Railroad Ave., SAN MATEO, CAL 



H.H.WINNER COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLETE BANK INTERIORS 
OF THE HIGHER CLASS 

Office: NEVADA BANK BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



146 



The Architect and Eiii^ineer 




O. S. S A R S I 

Architectural Sculptor 

^ High Class Ornamental Plaster. Ornamental Concrete 
Stone for Front of Buildings. Makers of Garden Furni- 
ture in Pompeiian Stone. Urns. Vases. Seats. Monuments. 
Caen Stone Mantel Pieces. Telephone Market 2970. 

123 OAK STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Lakeside 
2000 




Kes. Phone 
Merrltt 3485 


ROBERT SWAN 

Member of Builders' Exchange 


Painter and Decorator 




* 




110 Jessie St. 

1133 East Twelfth St. 


SAN FRANCISCO 
OAKLAND, CAL. 



PETERSEN-JAMES GO. 



PLUMBING 
HEATING 

CONTRACTORS 



710 Larkin St., San Francisco 

Telephones, Franklin 3540— C 2443 



PLUMBERS' MARBLE HARDWARE 

Suggestions 

Angle-Clamps. Railing and Standards, 
Reversible Spring Hinges, Locks, Vent 
Plates. 

BUILDERS' Hardware Specialties 

including 
Cremome Bolts. Casement Adjusters and 
Fasteners. Front Door Escutcheons. 
Sash Lifts. Lodge Room Door Wickets. 

WESTERN BRASS MFG. CO. 



When writing to Advertii 



Furnished Concrete Material for Munici- 
pal Auditorium 
The Niles Sand. Gravel and Rock 
Company, with main offices in tlie Mu- 
tual Bank Building, San Francisco, sup- 
plied practically all the gravel and sand 
used in the concrete work on the San 
Francisco Municipal Auditorium, which 
has just been completed in the Civic 
Center and which is illustrated elsewhere 
in this number. This building was de- 
signed by the consulting Board of Archi- 
tects, Board of Public Works, and was 
erected by the Eindgren Company at a 
cost of more than one million dollars. 
All the material furnished by the Niles 
Sand, Gravel and Rock Company was 
subjected to rigid test under the direc- 
tion of Professor Derleth, of the Univer- 
sity of California. Niles material was 
also used on the splendid concrete work 
in connection with the St. Francis Wood 
improvements, designed b\' Architect 
John Galen Howard, and built bj- the 
Bluxome Company. 




It is easy to get stung, 

But it is just as easy to 
get the BEST Elevator 

Door Hangers 

by ALWAYS specifying 

"RELIANCE" 

The magic Hanger for 
Speed, Silence and Ease 
of action. 

Reliance Ball Bearing 
Door Hanger Co. 

39 East 42J Stree;, New York 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS: 

Sartorius Company San Francisco, Call 

Louis R. Bedell Los Angeles, Ca.. 

Portland Wire & Iron Works Portland. Ore. 

D. E. Fryer & Co Seattle. Wash. 



Tlic .Irchitcct and Engineer 



147 



STEELCRETE" for School Partitions 




Polytechnic High School. San Francisco. Designed by Consulting Board of Architects 

*'STEELCRETE" Expanded Metal Lath used throughout this modern Temple of Learning. 

Furnished and Installed by 

HOLLOWAY EXPANDED METAL CO. 



Contractors for FLIRRING and LATHING 



ck Building, San Francisco 



STANDARDIZED PRODUCTS 

Jj^lg (s ^/m/l£h ^Lg^oHf 



FLOOR FINISH 

ELASTICA is the one 
floor varnish that will 
not only beautify but 
protect floors against 
the hardest sort of wear 
and tear. 

ELASTICA is equally 
adapted to hard or soft 
wood ; is mar.proof, spot- 
proof and heel-proof. 



WHITE ENAMEL 

The most pleasing finish for 
any room is beautiful white 
enamel — provided this is 
easily and economically 
applied and guaranteed to 
give long and satisfactory 
service. 

SATIN ETTE has for years 
been specified by leading 
architects and builders be- 
cause of its beautiful ap- 
pearance and long wear. 



STAINS 

KLEARTOXE STAINS 
are ideal for the decoration 
of doors, woodwork, etc. in 
the finest residences, bunga- 
lows, camps, in fact, for any 
sort of work where preser- 
vation of the natural beauty 
and grain of the wood is 
essential. 

KLEARTONE Stains are 
made in every desired color, 
for every known wood. 



3liU1IMRDliRNISn^IES 



New York 
Berlin 



Chicago 
Paris 



San Francisco 
Brussels 



London 
Melbourne 



INTERNATIONAL VARNISH CO.. Limited, Toronto, Canada. 



148 



The Architect and Engineer 



ELECTRICAL ILLUMINATING MECHANICAL 

CHARLES T. PHILLIPS 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

PACIFIC BLDG.. SAN FRANCISCO 

PLANS SPECIFICATIONS REPORTS 

The Economical Production, Distribution and Application of Light, Power, 
Heat and Ventilation. Illutnination Efficiency. Physical Reports. Electrol- 
ysis Investigations. Estimates and Tests. 



STEEL BARS for Concrete REINFORCEMENT 

WE CARRY A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

TWISTED SQUARES, PLAIN SQUARES AND ROUNDS 



WOODS & HUDDART 



444 MARKET STREET 



Tel. Sutter 2720 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



OIL BURNERS 

VACUUM PLANTS 
ICE MACHINES 

The Three Essentials for the Up-to-date 
HOTEL and APARTMENT HOUSE. 

With a JARVIS Guarantee Your Troubles Are Over. 
Home Manufacture — Everything but the motors 

T. P. JARVIS CRUDE OIL BURNING COMPANY 

Phone Market 3397 275 Connecticut Street, SAN FRANCISCO 




BOISE SANDSTONE 

Everlasting Fast-Cutting Fireproof 

Of Beautiful Color Inexpensive Strong j 

What more could be said of Perfect Stone • 

BOISE STONE COMPANY 

BOISE, IDAHO Cut by all Stone Contractors on the Pacific Coast 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



149 



PNEULECTRIC COMPANY 

VAIi HLEAN VACUUM CLEANIIR 



STATIONARY AND PORTABLE 
AVE SELL DIAMOND VACUUM HOSE 

'145 PHELAN BUILDING 



:AN FRANCISCO 



Electrical Specialties in San Francisco Stock 

Dayton Electrical Mfg. Co., E. H. Freeman Electric Co., Grabler Manufactur- 
ing Co., M. & M. Electrical Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh High Voltage Insulator 
Co., V. V. Fittings Co., Western Conduit Co. "Buckeve." Represented by 

ELECTRIC AGENCIES COMPANY 247 Minna Street, S. F 



McKIBBEIN iSs TAVLOR 

CEMEINT and COINCRETE COISXRA.CTORS 

Berkeley, 2125 SHATTUCK AVENUE 
Phone Berkeley 44 



ALBERT E. NOBLE 

Consulting Electrical 
Engineer 

173 Jessie St., opp. Builders' Exchange, Tel. Qarfield 7393, SAN FRANCISCO 



Examinations, Reports, Plans, Specifica- 
tions and Supervision of Electric 
Lighting and Power Plants 



SYLVAIN LeDEIT 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Art nnh Vltnhth CSkaa 



124 Lenzen avenue 



BURT T. OWSLEY 

General Contractor 

311 SHARON BLDG. PHONE SUTTER 2340 

San Francisco 



PHONE CONNECTION 



JOHN MONK 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Residence, 2016 VALLEJO ST. SAN FRANCISCO 



150 



The Archiiect and Engineer 



Phone 

Franklin 

2318 



SAN FRANCISCO 



D. ZELINSKY 

PAINTER - DECORATOR 

564 Eddy Street 



CONSTRUCTION AND ENGINEERING CO., Inc. 



GENERAL CONSTRUCTION 



HOBART BUILDING 



Phone Garfield 202 



SAN FRANCISCO 



A. PINNER, Pres. 



A. M. McLELLAN, Sec'y=Treas. 



Western Building & Engineering Company, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

OFFICE 

455 Phelan Building San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Garfield 7564 



THE INVINCIBLE VACUUM CLEANERS 

COMPRISE THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE OF VACUUM 
CLEANING MACHINERY ON THE MARKET. THEY ALSO STAND 
FIRST IN SIMPLICITY, EFFICIENCY AND DURABILITY 

A complete list of installations will be furnished any inquirer 
We have never had a failure or an unsatisfactory installation 

R. W. FOYLE, General Agent 

149 New Montgomery St. :: :: San Francisco, Cal. 



^ Architectural and Monumental 

Sculpture — Ornamental Modeling — 
Crematory Urns — Sculpture for Ital- 
ian Gardens in Cement or Marble — • 
Interior Decorations. .:. .:. .:. 

EXPOSIT ION CONC ESSIONS 
WESTERN SCULPTORS 

Phone Prospect 1336 
533-335 Turk Street San Francisco 




When writing to Advertisers please mention this mai^azine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



151 



Buildings recently furnished 

throughout with 

"HAJOCA SANITARY 
PLUMBING FIXTURES" 

Agricultural Hall. Berkeley. 
Pierce-.\i^ow Garage, San Francisco. 
Res.. Mr. Duncan McDuffie, Berkeley. 
Res., the Misses Sliepard. Berkeley. 
Res.. Mr. John Galen Howard, Berkeley. 
Oakland Auditorium, Oakland. 
Res., Mr. Chas. Templeton Crocker, Hills- 
borough. 
Res., Mr. C. Frederick Kohl, Hillsborough. 



Pullman Carol 
borough. 
Office Bldg., Hind Est., Sai 
Mary Elizabeth Inn, San F 
Dormitory Bldg., Davis, Cal. 
Res., I. W. Hellman. San Leand 
Marshall School, San Francisco. 
Agnew State Hospital, Agnew, C 
Firemans Fund Ins. Co., San Fr: 



Hi: 



Cal. 



Haines. Jones & Cadbury Co, 

1I30-II44 Ridge Avenue Pmiladelpmia 

San Francisco Office and Showrooms 
851-859 Foltom St., Bet. 4th and 5th 



Perfection Reversible 
Window 



Simple, Durable, Reversible, Weather- 
proof, easily installed, Cheap and 
Noiseless. Adapted for Casement 
Windows, Double Vertical Windows or 
Single Vertical Windows with or with- 
out cords or weights and French Win- 
dow effects. Secures Perfect Ventila- 
tion, Easily Cleaned, Insures Safety in 
Cleaning. 



WRITE OR PHONE FOR DEMONSTRATION 

EMIL BLOSSFELD, Inventor and Manager 

Perfection Revers- 
ible Window Co. 

2025 Market St., San Francisco 

Phones Market 8158— 3353 



V^/^'/ZTTy/E'/J^ 



UNFAILING in its operation the 
Prometheus Food and Plate Warmer has 
become the dependable one — the one 
demanded by the painstaking chef. 

Properly constructed, it keeps food 
warm without crusting or the loss of its 
first flavor. 

Prometheus — THE plate warmer — 
Electric, of course. 

M. E. Hammond 

217 Humboldt Bank Bldg. 
Phone Douglas 319 

SAN FRANCISCO - CAL. 




TH[f ESS SYSTEM 

RotaryCrudeOil Burners 

The original and still superior — 
winners of every contest 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 



SMOKELESS NOISELESS 



MONEY BACK IN FULL 
IF NOT SATISFACTORY 



FESS SYSTEM CO. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

OFFICE .AND factory: 

218 222 Natoma St., San rraneiseo 

Phone Sutter 92 7 



this magazine. 



152 



The Architect and Engineer 




PACIFIC SERVICE 



LIGHT HEAT POWER 



Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 



445 SUTTER STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC PHONE 
Sutter 140 



HOME PHONE 

C 0011 



"THE BOUDOIR" 

(REG. TRADE MARK) 
Pats. Dec. 1913, Jan. 1915 

The astonishing conven- 
ience and increased comfort 
afforded by "The Boudoir" 
bath fixture over the old 
style fi.\tures have been 
proven, and users every- 
where are making the facts 
known. Repeat orders are 
multiplying sales rapidly. 

TEN GOOD reasons: 

LARGER LAVATORY— Used from either side or end. 

ONE FAUCET— SuppHes either fixture. 

EXTRA SANITARY — Arrangement of wastepipes. 

EASIER AND SAFER— Support in getting in or out of tub. 

WATER SUPPLY— Operated near bather. 

SH( iWER, Shampoo — Refresh with clean water, warm or cold over head and body. 

SAVES ALL — cost of pipes, fittings and labor required for separate lavatory. 

BETTER ARRANGEMENT — Large lavatory accessible, instead of small one in comer. 

SAVES SPACE — A large item; reducing cost, aflfording additional room, or in- 
creasing space and comfort in any bathroom. 

NEW AND ORNAMENTAL — A valuable attraction in selling or renting homes 
and apartments. 

Sold through the trade. Prompt deliveries from Los Angeles, Cal. or Pittsburg. Pa. 




Main Office, 411 S. Los Angeles St. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



riting to Adv 



please mention this magazine 



The Architect and Engineer 



153 



AHeating:Contrac- ^S/^ 


What about the 


tor recently stated H 


Owner's troubles 


that what he saved |^L 


after the work is 


in cost of cheap I^P 


accepted? This 


Kadiator Valves ^Ik 


can be avoided by 


was lost 111 extra ^sKf!S 


. specifyins; "Genu- 


labor in ^ettina: the ^^^Hs 


tm ine JENKINS 


Valves tig;ht betore ^B^HH 


B**' BROS. Kadiator 


work was accepted. ^^S ^^ 


Valves." 


JENKINS 


BROS. 


247 Mission Street 


300 West Lake Stree 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


CHICAGO, ILL. 




BURLINGTON Y[NmAN BUNDS 

will make your porch a shady, airy summer 
resort with such perfect privacy that you can 
eat, sleep and live in the health-giving open 
air. The upper slats can be adjusted to admit 
light, while the lower slats are closed to shut 
out sun and gaze of passers-b^'. Easily 
lowered and raised. 

When you install Burlington Venetian 
Blinds, vou will need Burlington "First Qual- 
ity" Window Screens (inside and outSde) 
and Screen Doors with Rust-proof Wire Cloth. 

Burlington Patent Inside Sliding Blinds 
take the place of old-style folding blinds. 

BURLINGTON VENETIAN BLIND 
CO., 333 Lake Street, Burlington, Vt. 

C. F. WEBER & CO. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 



As Good as a Vacation ! 



Millwork Manufactured... 

....AND DELIVERED ANYWHERE 

Plans or Lists sent us for Estimates will 
have careful and immediate attention 

DUDFIELD LUMBER CO. 

Main Office, Yard and Planing MiU - PALO ALTO 



JNO. DUDFIELD. Pres. and Manager. 



JOSEPH A. JURY. Secty. and Mill Supt. 



When writing to .Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



154 



Tlie Architect and Engineer 



The Swedish Metal 
Preserver Company 

California Agents 

311 California St., San Francisco. 

An absolute guaranteed preventive 
of rust, electrolytic action and corro- 
sion on iron, steel and tin. One coat 
is sufficient, guaranteed for five years. 

Telephone Douglas 221 




WINDOW CO. 

No Weights — No Cords 
Manufactured in Wood 
and Metal Stock Lip 
Sashes used 
Simple frame construction 
reducing cost. Guaranteed 
rain and dust proof. In- 
stalled easily. Visit our 
office and inspect them 
Office, 226 Balboa BIdg. 
Second and Market Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Mount Diablo Cement 
Santa Cruz Lime 

ALL KINDS OF 

BUILDING 
MATERIALS 

Henry Cowcll Lime & Cement Co. 

No. 9 Main St., San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 2095 



A.J. FORBES & SON 

Established in San Francisco in 1850 

Office and Factory, IS30 FILBERT ST., S. F. 

Builders Ex. Box 236 

Bank, Store and Office 

Fittings 

Special Furniture and 
Interior Woodwork 



Fresno Art 
Glass Company 

JOHN YDREN, Prop. 

&{RT. LEADED §^KT> 
"PRISM GLASS WORK 

Estimates Furnished Anywhere 
in SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY. 

2124 Tuolumne St. Fresno, Cal. 



Jacob Schoenfeld Joseph Schoenfeld 

THE SCHOENFELD 
MARBLE COMPANY 

ARCHITECTURAL 
SCULPTURING & CARVING 




Phone Kearny 4086 Near 6th and Folsom Sts. 
265 Shipley St.. San Francisco 



Phone S. Jose 955 



W. H. OTTO 

CONCRETE 
CONTRACTOR 

Heavy Foundations and Bridges 

A Specialty. Anywhere in 

Northern California 

269 PARK AVE. SAN JOSE, CAL. 



RALSTON IRON 
WORKS INC. 

VAULT and PRISON DEPARTMENT 

CHAS. IVI. FINCH, M6R. 

Plans and Estimates to 

Architects on request 

444 MARKET STREET 

S.\.\' FR.^N'CISCO. CAL. 



writing to Advertisers pie 



The Architect and Engineer 



155 



UNITED STATES 
STEEL PRODUCTS CO. 

RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 

SELLERS OF THE PRODUCTS OF 



American Steel and 


Wire Co. 


American Bridge Co. 


American Sheet and 


Tin Plate Co. 


Carnegie Steel Co. 


Illinois Steel Co. 



National Tube Co. 
Lorain Steel Co. 
Shelby Steel Tube Co. 
Tennessee Coal, Iron 

and Railroad Co. 
Trenton Iron Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Structural Steel for Every Purpose. 
Bridges, Railway and Highway. 

"Triangle Mesh" Wire Concrete Reinforcement. 
Plain and Twisted Reinforcing Bars. 

Plates, Shapes and Sheets of Every Description. 
Rails, Splice Bars. Bolts, Nuts, etc. 
Wrought Pipe, Valves, Fittings, Trolley Poles. 

Frogs, Switches and Crossings for Steam Railway and Street Railway. 
"Shelby" Seamless Boiler Tubes and Mechanical Tubing. 

"Americore" and "Globe" Rubber Covered Wire and Cables. 
"Reliance" Weatherproof Copper and Iron Line Wire. 
"American" Wire Rope, Rail Bonds, Springs, 
Woven Wire Fencing and Poultry Netting. 
Tramways, etc. 



United States Steel Products Co. 

OFFICES AND WAREHOUSES AT 

San Francisco - Los Angeles - Portland - Seattle 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



156 



The Architect and Engineer 



ARTHUR W. BIGGERS 



General Contractor and Engineer 



Santa Marina Building, 112 Market Street 

Telephone Connection 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



SELF-WINDING CLOCKS 

PROGRAM CLOCK SYSTEMS 
TOWER CLOCKS 



Decker Electrical Construction Company 



111 New Montgomery Street, San Francisco 
AGENTS, SELF WINDING CLOCK COMPANY 



NEW YORK 



Phone Sutter 1687 



Everything in TILE 

CALIFORNIA TILE 
CONTRACTING CO. 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

461 Market St., 206 Sheldon Bldg. SAN FRANCISCO 



ril 




j 


1 1 H 






^3 


1 


\ I 




^^ 


1 



"QUICK SET" 

SWITCH BOX MOUNT- 
INGS of IRON for Loom 
Boxes 

Cost less installed than 
wood backing. Is rigid , 
gives full key to plaster. 
thereby preventing plaster 
cracks, is adjustable to any 
make loom box, or gangs of 
bo.xes, and gives a square 
line-up. Supports are 16 
inches long, and can be 
easily shortened by nicking 
with pliers at slots and 
breaking off ends. Put up 
in sets complete with bolts. 
Sold by the leading jobbers 
of Electrical Supplies. 
ELECTRIC UTILITIES 

MFG. CO. 
Main Office, 518 Pacific 
Building, San Francisco 



The Architect and Ens.ineer 



157 



LATH, SHINGLES, SHAKES and POSTS, SASH, DOORS and MILL WORK 
TIMBERS and SPECIALS KILN DRIED FINISH and FLOORING 

SUNSET LUMBER COMPANY 

DEALERS WHOLESALE AND RETAIL IX 

PINE and REDWOOD LUMBER 



PHONE OAKLAND 1820 



YARDS AND OFFICE 

OAK AND FIRST STS., OAKLAND, CAL. 



u », J i TRACY, CAL. 
Branch Yards , maYFIELD, CAL 



, LUMBER EX. 30 



Large Timbers 
and Special 

Bills to Order 

Kiln Dried 

Oregon Pine 

Finish 



Phones ; MARKET 1485 

SANTA FE LUMBER COMPANY 

Dealers in Wholesale and Retail 

LUMBER 



Main Yard onSOUTHEKN PACIFIC, WESTERN PACIFIC, SANTA FE 
nth and De Haro Streets .-. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Phone Sutter 2401 

WILLIAMS BROS. & HENDERSON 



E. F. Henderson W. M. Williams Chas. Williams 



BUILDING CONTRACTORS 



Room 447 
HOLBROOK BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 




Meurer Bros. Co. 

METAL SPANISH TILE 

Tiffany Pattern. A perfect and hand- 
some Roof Covering. The only tile that 
gives the effect of Lights and Shadows. 
'Tis absolutely water-tight. Used on all 
the schools in San Jose. 

A. H. McDonald, Pac. Coast Mgr. 

OfSce and Warehouse; 

630 Third Street - - San Francisco, Cal. 



riting to Advertisers please mention this magazii 



158 



The Architect and Ens;ineer 




TTHIS photograph will 
^ give you an idea of 
our BLACK Glazed 
Enameled Brick, a 

strikingly handsome trim 
for either a Red or Cream 
Colored Pressed Brick 
Exterior. Takes the 
place of Stone or Terra 
Cotta. 



Write for Particulars and Samples 

Craycroft-Herrold Brick Co. 

407 Griffith McKenzie Building, 
FRESNO, CAL. 



"BEST PAVING BLOCK MADE" 



Vitrified 
Paving Block 

Vitrified Step 
and Face Brick 

Sewer Brick 

Fancy Face Brick 

Fire Brick 



THE HOME OF 

: CALIFORNIA VITRIFIED 

PAVING BLOCK 




Permanent 

and 

Sanitary 
Pavements 



Common Brick 

AND 

"EVERYTHING IN CLAY BUILDING PRODUCTS" 



CALIFORNIA BRICK COMPANY 



Plant at 
Decoto, California 



630-632 Phelan Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Eiii^ijieer 159 

F. J. W. ANDERSEN C. LARSEN 

PACiriC STRUCTURAL IRON WORKS 

STRUCTURAL IRON AND STEEL, FIRE ESCAPES, ETC. 



JAS. KERR, President J. BAYLIS. Secretary- 

ROBERTS MANUrACTURIING CO. 

Designers and Makers of LIGHTING FIXTURES 

663 MISSION STREET 1318 CLAY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, Phone Kenrnj- 1715 OAKLAND 



BENINETT BROS. 

Sarg:ent's Building: Hardware 

514=516 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



AMERICAN CONCRETE CO. 

JuSKPH Pasqualetti. Manager 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

1704 HUMBOLDT BANK BUILDING 785 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

PACIFIC DEPARTMEINT 

Olobe Indemnity Company 

Bonds and Casualty Insurance for Contractors 

120 Leidesdorff street Phone Sutter 2280 SAN FRAINCISCO 

CHRIS. TOTTEN Terephone Stockton 1770 

TOTTEN & BRANDT PLANING MILL CO. 

General Mill Work — Sash, Doors, Mouldings 

18-48 W. SCOTTS AVE., STOCKTON, CAL. P. O. Box 298 

Independent Sewer Pipe & Terra Cotta Co. 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 
GLAZED AND ENAMELED BRICK 
VITRIFIED SALT GLAZED SEWER PIPE 
TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY PIPE & FLUE LINING 

235 South Los Angeles Street Phonei A312I. Broadway 3390 LOS ANGELES 

Bstablished 1886 Phone, Market 2848 

T. H. MEEK COMPANY 



Salesrooms. 
1157 Mission St. San Francisco 



■iting to Advertisers pie 



160 



The Architect and Ennnccr 





SATHER TOWER, UXIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. BERKELEY, CAL. 
JOHN G. HOWARD. Architect 

This Classic Monumental Shaft, the gift of Mrs. Jane K. Sather 
IS FACED WITH 

RAYMOND GRANITE 

and is considered one of Mr. Howard's Best Efforts. 

The Italian-American Bank Illustrated Elsewhere in this Number and 
designed by Mr. Howard, is also built of RAYMOND GRANITE. 

Raymond Granite Company 

Incorporated 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



riting to Advertisers please ni'jntion this magazine 



The Arcliitcct and Eiigiiu-cr 



161 




UXa'F.RSITY OF CALIFORXIA LIIiRARV BriLDIXr,. BERKELEY. CALIFORNIA. 
JOHN G.\LEX HO\V.\RD. .\rchitect 



A Beautiful Buildina; of 



RAYMOND GRANITE 

Other University Buildings whose Exterior Finish is 
of RAYMOND GRANITE are the CALIFORNIA 
H \LL, BOALT HALL, and MINING BUILDING 

Raymond Granite Company 

CONTRACTORS FOR STONE WORK 
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Office and Yard: Quarries: 

Potrero Ave. & Division Sts. Raymond, Madera Co. 

San Francisco California 



When writing to .\dvertisers please nienticn this niaga 



162 The Architect and Engineer 



WITTMAN, LYMAN & CO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



PLUMBING, STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING 



Agents for the Lilley Drinking Fountain 
Phone Market 74b 



WEST COAST WIRE AND IRON WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ARTISTIC BRONZE, IRON AND WIRE WORK 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION AND FINISH 

861-863 HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



GRAHAM & JENSEN 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Phone Sutter 1839 415-16 Maskey Bldg., 46 Kearny St., San Francisco 

MONSON BROS. Phone Market 2593 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Office, 1907 Bryant Street SAN FRANCISCO 



NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 

MacArthur Bros. Company 

Preliminary Reports, Plans and Specifications, Construction and Erection of Dams, 
Bridges, Railroads, Power Plants, Etc. 

MacArthur Concrete Pile & Poundation Co. 

Foundation Contractors, Pedestal Concrete Piles 
1014 Chronicle Building, S an Francisco Phone Sutler 1364 

H. A. Chalmers, Manager Telephone Sutter 2985 C. H. Chalmers, Engineer 

H. A. CHALMERS, Inc. 

CONCRETE - FIREPROOFING 



San Francisco [levator Co., Inc. 

PI FVAXOR^ 860 Folsom St. ^hines. Push Button Passenger 

■-■-■- V/'^ ■ V-rr%C3 San Francisco Elevators a Specialty. 



Automatic Electric, Hydraulic, 
Belt Power. Automatic Dumb- 
waiters and Handpower Ma- 



BARRETT & HILP I L. M. HAUSMANN 

Concrete Construction I Civil Engineer 

Phone Sutter 4598, 
SHARON BUILDING, 55 New Montgomery Street, SAN FRANCISCO 



The Architect and Engineer 



163 



Howard S.Williams 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTOR 
AND BUILDER 



Hearst Building, 
San Francisco 



Telephone, 
Sutter 295 



Telephone Douglas 2051 



M. FISHER 

General Contractor 

105 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco 



Phone Garfield 7906 



Collman & Collman Co. 



GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 

526 Sharon BIdg. San Francisco 



The Mosaic Tile Co., 

of Zanesville, Ohio 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
FLOOR, WALL and MANTEL 

TILE 

San Francisco Office and Warehouse 

230 - 8th Street Tel. Market 1383 



J.M.BOSCUS 

Plumbing 
Heating 



Phone 975 HOWARD ST. 

Douglas 669 San Francisco 



Phone Douglas IS66 



ArcKitectural "WorK 
a Specialty 

aid to 
Detail 

717 MARKET STREET. SAN 
FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 
PHOTO-ENGRAVING CO. 




THE PRANKfORT GENERAL INSURANCECO. 

OF FRANKFORT. ON -THE- MAIN. GERMANY 

Liability 

Workmen's Collective 

Workmen's Compensation 
Burglary 
Personal Accident and Health 
Industrial Accident and Health 
WALTER A. CHOWEN. Pacific Coast General Agent 
340 Sansome Street, San Francisco 
Central California Agency Southern California Agency 
BEN LEON«RD COMPANy CONSOLIDATED AGENCY COMPANV 
617 "J" St... Sacramento 334 Central Bldg., Los -Angeles 



164 The Architect and Engineer 

Phone Douglas 2370 

McLERAN & PETERSON 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

SHARON BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



R. W. MOLLER 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Phone Sutter 5228 185 Stevenson Street, San Francisco 



W. L. KELLEY O. Q. HOAAS 

P. A. PALMER 

Contracting Engineer 

625-627 Monadnock Building SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



COMPENSATION INSURANCE SURETY BONDS 

H. V. MAC MEANS & COMPANY 

341 MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Phones, Sutter 1871—1872 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Factory Phone, 2629.J Office Phone, 2770-J 

Granite Press Brick Co. 

L, C. BRINKMEYER. President and Manager 

431 OCHSNER BUILDINQ SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTIV1EINT 

FIDELITY AND DEPOSIT COMPANY OF MARYLAND 

Bonds and Casualty Insurance for Contractors 

Insurance Exchange Bide. Phnnps 5 '' '"^^^ 
SAN FRANCISCO f nones ^ ,^ga^„y ,453 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2389 

WILLIAM H. FERGUSON 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER 
and QUANTITY SURVEYOR 

110" CROCKER BUILDING - . . . SAN FRANCISCO 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

of San Francisco 

MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BUILDING 

Surety Bonds. Liability Insurance The Only California Surety Company 



"GOLDEN GATE CEMENT" Means Success in the Concrete. 

THE ARCHITECT 
AND ENGINEER 
OF CALIFORNIA 



/ ■"''•muji , r .. , 



// 



rp*^^iii'i\. ; 




FEBRUARY 



MCMXV 



PVBLI5HED IN 5AN FRANCISCO- 

25 CENT5 A COPY '^ ONE DOLLAR AND A HALF A YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND SEATTLF LOS ANfJELES VANCOUVER 



L. A. NORRIS CO. 

Clinton Welded Reinforcing System 
STEEL BARS AND CLINTON FABRIC 



CUNTON WIRE LATH 

Phone Kearny 5375 140 TOWNSEND STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ART HARDWARE 

REPRESENTATIVE FOR 

Yale and Towne Fine Hardware 
Lockwood Mfg. Go's Builders' Hardware 

DISPLAY ROOMS 
San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley 

PACIFIC HARDWARE AND STEEL CO. 



IMTT 1?Q CLEAN GRAVEL and 
i>llJUriO CRUSHED ROCK 

Means a Good Job of Concrete. 

Contractors who want Prompt Delivery, Right Quotations and the 
Best Material, write or call up the 

California Building Material Co. 

Phone, Sutter 4845 500-4 NEW CALL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



^DENISON INTERLOCKING TILE 

^^H A CLAY PRODUCT 

^^Kr AND THE 

^^^ Coming Building Material 

Phone WRITE NOW TO 

^$'^, DENISON BLOCK COMPANY 

3l0 Ochsner Bldg. Sacramento, Cal. 



The Architect and Engineer 




vriting to Adverti; 



The Architect and Engineer 



HARDWOOD FLOORS in this HOTEL 




FAIRMONT HOTEL. SAN FRANCISCO. 
REID BROS., Architects 



^.d 



The Fairmont is 
Recognized by Tour- 
ists as one of the 
Best Equipped Ho- 
tels in the World. 
The OAK FLOORS 
in the Spacious Ball 
Room furnished and 
laid by 



HARDWOOD INTERIOR COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Bmeritan IKeene Cement Co. 

Office, 257 Monadnock Building, SAN FRANCISCO 
Works, SIGUARD, UTAH 

Formerly Known as BICKEL'S KEENE CEMENT 




Strongest Keene Cement Known" 



RECENT SAN FRANCISCO BUILDINGS: 
Flood Residence, Bliss & Faville, Architects 

Physicians' Building, Frederick H. Meyer, Architect 

Hotel Ramona, Smith & Stewart, Architects 

American Keene Cement Company 

of California 

Telephone Garfield 7331 257 Monadnock Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



vriting to Advertisers please mentit 



The Architect and Eng^incer 



W OLD and RELIABLE BELL EOUNDRY 

ESTABLISHED 1856 

CHURCH BELLS, CHIMES and PEALS 

TOWER CLOCK BELLS AND WESTMINSTER CHIMES 

COURT HOUSE and FIRE ALARM BELLS 

CHAPEL AND SCHOOL BELLS 

LIGHT HOUSE, FOG SIGNAL AND SHIP BELLS 





|1 



CATHEDRAL OF ST. HELENA, HELENA. MONTANA 

A chime of 15 bells has just been completed for the Cathedral of St. Helena, Helena. 
Montana, for Rt. Rev. Bishop John P. Carroll, who writes: 

"Our chime was heralded as having no superior anywhere in the world and as being 
equal to the chime of the Denver Cathedral made by the same concern — which two years 
ago was pronounced the best in the world. Residents of Helena who have heard the 
Denver chime believe ours surpasses even it in sweetness. This is a source of pardonable 
pride to the people of the city and state, but especially to Mr. Cruse, the generous donor." 

McShane Bell Foundry Co. 

Home Office and Foundries: BALTIMORE, MD., U. S. A. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS: 

The Standard Electric Time Co. 

461 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Telepho»e SUTTER 241 

PORTLAND SEATTLE LOS ANGELES 

202-204 Commercial Club Bldg. White Bldg. 706-707 Marsh-Strong Bldg. 



When writing to Ad\ 



this magazine. 



The Architect and E>t"iucer 



^ ■ ^, 




FREDERICK H. MEYER. Architect 



BELGRAVIA APART- 

A^^TTMTC Sutter andjones streets 
iVlHii-N 1 O San Francisco : Calif. 

EQUIPPED WITH 

PITCHER 

Disappearing Doors 
Adjustable Hangers 



Patented Frames 

Pitcher Disappearing Doors In- 
stalled in 53^-inch Partitions. No 
Extra Thickness of Wall Required. 
Specify Sliding Doors in Place of 
Swinging Doors. 



NATIONAL MILL & LUMBER CO, 

5th and Bryant Streets, San Francisco 



Mr. Architect 

— Here is some- 
thing that will 
readily appeal to 
3'our client, the 
Owner, for it 
means a saving 
to him of quite 
a little sum an- 
nually. 

— The — 

Pendergast Flag Pole Tackle 

Enables the Janitor or any Employe of a building to lower Flag 
Pole to the Roof and keep it Painted and in Good Repair. 
Can be attached to usual Stub Pole Construction. 

For Further particulars and illustrated leaflet address 

PACIFIC FOUNDRY COMPANY 

Harrison and Eighteenth Streets, San Francisco 




riting to Adverlii 



The Architect and Engineer 



Pour Your 
Concrete by 
GRAVITY 

and Use the 

Insley 

Method 

OF 

Distribution 




Full Line of 
Excavating 
Machi nery 










Marsh -Capron Concrete Mixers 



M-C Rail Track Paving Mixers 
in Three Sizes 




Mead-Morrison 

Steam Electric 

and Gasoline 

Hoisting 

Machinery 



Clam Shell and 

Orange Peel 

Buckets 



GARFIELD MEYERS, District Mgr. 

1017 Hearst Building, San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magaz 



The Architect and Engineer 

r-FOR MODERN REINFORCED CONCRETE-n 
DAYLIGHTED BUILDINGS 

We manufacture and can furnish all the required Materials except 
the cement, sand, stone and lumber. We will promptly furnish esti- 
mates on any construction for these products 



UNITED SASH 
UNITED CASEMENTS 
United Fire Windows 
UNITED DOORS 
KAHN BARS 
RIB BARS 



RIB METAL 
ARMOR PLATE 
BARS 



TRUSSED 

CONCRETE 

STEEL 

CO. 

Home Office and Plant 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO 

San Francisco 

517 Sharon Bldg. Tel. Sutter 1067 

LOS ANGELES 
PORTLAND SEATTLE SPOKANE 



FLORETYLES 
FLOREDOMES 
HY-RIB 
RIB LATH 
DIAMOND MESH 
CHANNELS 
CORNER BEAD 
RIB STUDS 
SLOTTED INSERTS 
SPECIALTIES 



TRUS-CON CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 



ARMCO 

American Ingot Iron 

in the form of Roofing, Flashing, Cornices, Conductor Pipe, Window 
Frames, Metal Lath and Terne Plate has proven its Lasting Quality. 

ARMCO IRON 

Resists Rust 



mm 



v 


v-y^ 


The tradeN 


. / mark ARMCO 


carries the as- 


>>' surance thai 


iron bearing th 


t mark is manutac- 


tured by The American Rolling Mill 1 


Company with the skill, inlelligcnce 1 


and fidelity asso 


ciated with its prod- 


ucis, and hence 


can be depended up- 




tlie highest degree 


llie me,,, cir.ime 





Call at our Exhibit in the Mines and Metallur- 
gy Building of the Panama-Pacific Exposition. 

THE AMERICAN ROLLING 



MILL CO. 

Licensed Manufacturers under Patents granted 
to the International Metal Products Company 

MIDDLETOWN, OHK 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



relephone 
Sunset So. 
6558. 
Hame 24338. 




LARGEST 
THEATRE 
OUTFinERS 
IN AMERICA 



DROP CURTAINS, SCENERY, SUPPLIES. DECORATIONS 

SPECIAL WESTERN AGENTS J. R. CLANCY. SYRACUSE, N.Y.. STAGE HARDWARE. 

1638 Long Beach .^ve., Los Anseles. 143 W. 42d St.. New York City. 502 Westbank Bldi;.. San Francisco 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX 



(For Index to .Advertisements, 



\ext page) 



ARCHITECTURAL SCULPTORS, MODELING, 
ETC. 

O. S. Sarsi, 123 Oak St., San Francisco. 

G. Rognier & Co , 233 R. R. Ave., San Mateo. 

G. Tomagnini & Co., 219 Tentli St., San Fran- 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

Gladding. McBean & Company, Crocker Bldg.. 

San Francisco. 
Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Independent Sewer Pine & Terra Cotta Co., 

235 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles. 

ART GLASS 

Sylvain Le Deit, 124 Lenzen Ave., San Jose. 
Fresno Art Glass Co., 2124 Tuolumne St., 
Fresno. 

AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS 

Scott Company, 243 Minna St., San Francisco 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 

BANK FI.XTURES AND INTERIORS 
A. J. Forbes & Son, 1530 Filbert St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Fink & Schindler, 218 13th St., San Francisco. 
C. _F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 

M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San Francisco. 
Home Mfg. Co., 543 Brannan St., San Fran- 



San Fr 



Cisco. 



Company, Nevada Bank Bldg., 



BELTING, PACKING, ETC. 

H. N. Cook Belting Co., 317-319 Howard St., 
San Francisco. 
BELLS— TOWER. ETC. 

McShane Bell Foundry Co., 461 Market St., 
San Francisco. 
BLACKBOARDS 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
BONDS FOR CONTRACTORS 

Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland, Ir 
surance Exchange Bldg., San Francisco. 

Globe Indemnity Co., Insurance Exchange Bldg 
San Francisco. 

J. B. Nabors & Sons, Kohl Bldg., San Franciscc 

Pacific Coast Casualty Co.. 416 Montgomery St 
San Francisco. 

H. Y. MacMeans & Co., 341 Monadnock Bldg, 
San Francisco. 
BRICK— PRESSED. PAVING. ETC. 

California Paving Brick Co., Phelan Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Craycroft-Herrold Brick Co., Griflith-McKenzie 
Bidg., Fresno. Cal. 

Granite Press Brick Co., Ochsner Bldg., Sacra- 
mento. 



(See Adv. 

24 California 

ussed Concrete 
Pacific Coast 



BRICK— PRESSED, P.WING, ETC.— Continued. 
Diamond Brick Co., Balboa Bldg., San Francisco. 
Gladding, McBean & Company, Crocker Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co., Frost Bldg., Lot 

Angeles. 
Livermore Fire Brick Co., Livermore. Cal. 
Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery Works, Mills 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 

BRICK AND CEMENT COATING 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co., Inc. 
for Pacific Coast Agents.) 

Biturine Company of America, 
St.. San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Par-Seal, made by T: 
Steel Co. (See Adv. "for 
Agents.) 

Glidden Products, sold by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
Howard and Beale Sts., San Francisco, and 
Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., 908 Swain St., Los An- 
geles. 
BRICK STAINS 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco. Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 
BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

Bennett Bros., agents for Sargent Hardware, 
514 Market St.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and Los Angeles. 

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co., Commercial Bldg.. 
San Francisco. 

Vonnegut Hardware Co., Indianapolis. (See 
Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

Western Brass Mfg. Co., 217 Tehama St., S. F. 
BUILDING MATERIAL, SUPPLIES, ETC. 

Pacific Building Materials Co., 523 Market St., 
San Francisco. 

C. Jorgensen & Co.. 356 Market St., S. F. 

Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St., San Francisco. 

C. Roman, 173 Jessie St., San Francisco. 

C. F. Pratt Building Material Co,, Hearst 
Bldg,, San Francisco. 
CASTINGS 



■ilic Fourdr 



npan 



Ha 



111 18th 



CEMEN'i ^ , ,, . 

Atlas Portland Cement Co., represented by Unit- 
ed Materials Co. and Pacific Portland Cement 
Company, San Francisco. 

Mt. Diablo, sold by Henry Cowell Lime & Ce- 
ment Co.. 9 Main St„ San Francisco, 

"Golden Gate," manufactured by Pacific Port- 
land Cement Co., Pacific Bldg., San Francisco. 



All Grades of GRAVEL for CONCRETE AND ROAD WORK 



Clean Fresh Water 
Gravel from Pleas- 
anton — Healdsburg 

Roofing Gravel 



Phone Sutter 1582 



A few jobs on which our material was used: Temporary City Hall, Masonic Temple, 
Stanford Apartments. Sixteenth Street Station at Oakland. St. Luke's Hospital, 
Lowell High School and hundreds of other first-class buildings. Accepted on all 
City, State and United States Government work. 

nPAMT nPAVFI CC\ FLATIRON BUILDING. SAN FRANCISCO 
VJI\/A1"N I VJ l\AA V L L \^KJ, ^j Market, Sutter and Sansome Streets 



The Architect and Engineer 



An Index to the Advertisements 



Page 

American Art Metal Works. . . 148 

American Concrete Co 149 

American Heat & Power Co. . 26 

American Keene Cement Co . . 2 

American RoUing MiU 6 

American Steel Bar Co ? 7 

Amweg. F. J 130 

Armstrong Cork Co 145 

Atlas Portland Cement Co. . . 1 

Austin Cube Mixer 26 

Bacon. Ed. R 120 

Bass-Hueter Co 17 

Bennett Bros 149 

Biggers, A. W 153 

Biturine Co 34 

Boise Sandstone Co 140 

Boscus, J. M 146 

Bowser & Co.. S. F 23 

Braun, J. G 27 

Breite, W. W 131 

Brode Iron Works 31 

Bullis, E. A. & Co 20 

Burdett-Rowntree Mfg. Co. . . 15 

Burlington Venetian Blind Co. 145 

Burnett Iron Works 119 

Butte Engineering Co 121 

Cabot. Samuel (Inc.) 30 

Caementum Paint Co 151 

Calif. Artistic Metal & Wire Co. 14 
California Bldg. Material Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

California Granite Co 122 

California Paving Brick Co. . . 151 

California Photo Engraving Co. 153 

California Plumbing Supply Co. 33 

California Tile Contracting Co. 135 

Capitol Sheet Metal Works. . . 9 

Central Electric Co 122 

Central Iron Works 31 

Chalmers. H. A 152 

Chicago Pump Co 131 

Chowen. W. A 146 

Clinton Fireoroofing Co 152 

Coburn. C. W 154 

Coleman. Alex 138 

Collins Studding " \ii 

Collman & Collman 153 

Colonial Fireplace Co 33 

Connolly, J. J 130 

Construction & Engineer'g Co. 152 

Cook. H. N., Belting Co 26 

Cowell Lime & Cement Co . . . 146 

Crane Co a 

Craycroft-Herrold Brick Co.. . 151 

Cutler Mail Chute Co 28 

Dahlstrom Metallic Door Co. 36 

Decker Electrical Co 135 

Deni.son Blocks 

Inside Front Cover 

Diamond Brick Co 22 

Dieckmann Hardwood Co 120 

Dolbear Curb Bar ,.'. 27 

Dudfield Lumber Co . . '. 1 47 

Dyer Bros \ 29 

Elevator Supply and Repair Co. 15 

Ferguson. W. H 143 

Fess System 148 

Fibrestone and Roofing Co . . . 11 
Fidelity and Deposit Company 

of Maryland 1 43 

Finch. Chas. M . . . . 146 

Fink & Schindler Co.. The'.'. '. '. 126 

Fisher. M 153 

Fitzpatrick. F. W '.'.'.'. 24 

Flagg. Edwin H.. Scenic Co.!! 7 

Forbes. A. J. & Son 146 

Poster. Vogt Co 130 

Foyle. R. W ■ 141 

Frankfort Insurance Co 146 

Fresno Art Glass Co.. 146 

Fuller. W. P.. Co !!! 19 

Gaspard & Hammond 10 

Giant Suction Cleaner Co ... . 134 
Gladding, McBean & Co 25 



Glidden Varnish Co 1 36 

Globe Indemnity Co 149 

Granite Press Brick Co 143 

Grant Gravel Co 7 

Gravity Spiral Chute Co 137 

Hammond. M. E 148 

Hardwood Interior Co 2 

Hauser Reversible Window. . . 146 
Haws Sanitary Driiiking Foun- 
tain 137 

Hillard. C. J.. Co 32 

HoUoway Expanded Metal Lath 

Co 139 

Holmes Lime Co 9 

Home Mfg. Co 130 

Hunt. Robt. W. & Co 127 

Hunter & Hudson 122 

Imperial Waterproofing Co 18 

Improved Sanitary Fixture Co. 15 
Independent Sewer Pipe & 

Terra Cotta Co 149 

Insley Mfg. Co. ... , 5 

International Concrete Con. Co 150 

Invincible Vacuum Cleaner. . . 165 

Jarvis. T. P 140 

Jenkins Bros 145 

Johnson. S. T.. Co 13 

Jorgensen & Co 29 

Judson Mfg. Co 148 

Kinnear Rolling Doors 34 

Le Deit, Svlvain 9 

Livermore Fire Brick Co 34 

Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co. 24 

MacArthur Bros. Co 152 

Mackenzie Roof Co 131 

MacMeansCo '. 143 

Mangrum & Otter 137 

Marshall & Stearns Co 29 

McCabe Hanger Co.. . 130 

McKibben & Taylor 130 

McLaren & Peterson 143 

McShane Bell Foundry 3 

Medusa Portland Cement. 6 

Meek. T. H 149 

Meese & Gottfried Co 144 

Merritt Ironing Board 32 



Me 



147 



MoUer. R. W _ 

Monk. John ' 141 

Monson Bros ] 52 

Morehouse. C. C ! ! ! ! 135 

Mortenson Construction Co. .. 10 



Mo 



Tile Co 



153 



Mott Iron Works 33 

Municipal Engineering Co 26 

Muralo Co 124 

Musto-Keenan Co ' 12 

Myers. Garfield !.! s 

Xabors Sc Sons 152 

Nason. R. N.. & Co 12 

Nathan. Dohrmann Co.. ..!! ! 138 

National Lumber Co 4 

National Roofing Co ! ! ! 14 

Nelson. N. O ' 18 

Niles Sand. Gravel & Rock Co. 22 
Norris Co.. L.A., Inside Front Cover 

Otis Elevator Co Back Cover. 

Otto. W. H 146 

Owsley. Bert 122 

Pacific Building Materi.ils Co. 

Inside Back Cover 

Pacific Coast Casualty Co ... . 143 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co . . 26 

Pacific Foundry Co 4 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co 142 

Pacific Gumey Elevator Co. . . 130 
Pacific Hardware and Steel Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

PacificImp.Co 150 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Co ... . 

Back of Cover 

Pacific Portland Cement Co. 

1st and 4th Cover 



Page 

Pacific Rolling Mills 31 

Pacific Sanitary Mfg. Co 

Back of Cover 

Pacific Structural Iron Works . 149 

Pacific Sewer Pipe Co 25 

Palm Iron Works 32 

Palmer. P. A 143 

Parafiine Paint Co 21 

Parrott & Co 132 

Perfection Reversible Window 

Co 121 

Peterson- James Co 138 

PhiUips. Chas. T 140 

Pitcher Door Hanger 4 

Pratt Bldg. Material Co 119 

Prometheus Electric Co 148 

Ralston Iron Works 32 

Ransome Concrete Co 122 

Raymond Granite Co 141 

Reliance Bali-Bearing Door 

Hanger 126 

Riggs. Arthur T 131 

Rognier & Co 138 

Roman. C IS 

Samson Cordage Works 122 

S. F. Metal Stamping and Cor- 
rugating Co 2 8 

S. F. Pioneer Varnish Works . . 17 

Santa Fe Lumber Co 147 

Sarsi. O. S 138 

■ Schaer Bros 18 

Scott Co 130 

Self Winding Clock Co 135 

Shreiber &■ Sons Co 28 

Southern Pacific Co 134 

Spencer Elevator Co 13 

Standard Varnish Works 139 

Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery 

Works 25 

Stock. Lester H 122 

Sturgis. G. E 137 

Sunset Lumber Company 147 

Swan. Robert 138 

Telephone Electric Equipment 

Co 131 

Thayer & Co 21 

Tomagnini & Co 16 

Toplight Shade Co 142 

Totten Planing Mill Co 149 

Trussed Concrete Steel Co. .. . 6 

TuecCo 133 

United Electric Co 133 

United Materials Co 24 

U. S. Metal Products Co 35 

U. S. Steel Products Co 144 

Utility Gas Generator Co 137 

Van Fleet. M. C 145 

Vonnegut Hardware Co 124 

Vulcan Iron Works 28 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co. . . 30 

Waters. R. J 153 

Weber. C. F. & Co 150-145 

West Coast Wire & Iron Works 152 

West. M.G 36 

Western Brass Mf'g Co 138 

Western Building and Engineer- 
Company 135 

Western Builders' Supply Co . . 23 

Western Iron Works 31 

Western States Porcelain Co. . 22 

White Bros 118 

White Steel Sanitary Co 11 

Whitney Window Co 25 

Whittier-Coburn Co 136 

Williams Bros. & Henderson. . 141 

Williams. H.S 1S3 

Winner Co., H. H 138 

Wittman. Lyman & Co 152 

Wood Lumber Co 122 

Woods & Huddart 140 

Zelinsky. D 149 



The Architect and Engineer 



PHONE, SAN JOSE. 2985 



SYLVAIN LEDEIT 

lUFACTUREH OF 

Art nni lUtuhth (^Inm 



124 LENZEN^ AVENUE 



SAN JOSE, CAL. 



ARCHITECTS" SPECIFICATION INDEX-Continued 



CEMEXT— Contiiucd. . , 

Medusa White Portland Cement, sold by Build- 
ing Material Co., Inc., Monadnock Bldg., San 
Francisco. 
CEMEXT EXTERIOR WATERPROOF CO.-VTING 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coaling, made by 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. (See distributing 
.\genls on page JO.) 

Eiturine Co., of America, 24 California St., San 
Francisco. 

"Impervite" sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement on page 26.) 

Imperial Waterproofing, manufactured by Im- 
perial Co.. 183 Stevenson St.. San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Par-Seal, made by Trussed Concrete 
Sttel Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

GHdden's Liquid Cement and Liquid Cement 
Enamel, sold on Pacific Coast by Whittier, Co- 
burn Company, San Francisco, and Tibbetts- 
Oldfield Co., Los Angeles. 

CEMENT EXTERIOR FIXISH 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St.. San Francisco. 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made bv 
Wadsworth. Howland & Co. (See list of Dis- 
tributing .\gents on jtage 30.) 

Glidden"s Liquid Cement and Liquid Cement 
Enamel, sold on Pacific Coast bv Whittier Co- 
burn Co., San Francisco, and 1 ibbetts-Oldfield 
Co.. Los Angeles. 

Dry Mortar Colors sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. 
(See advertisement, page 26.) 

Medusa White Portland Cement, California 
Agents, the Building Material Co., Inc., 587 
Monadnock Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Concre'e Cenient Cori'ing. manufactured bv the 
Muralo Company, 5-10 \'alencia St.. San Fran- 
Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co.. Boston, Mass.. agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland. Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

CEMENT FLOOR COATING 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made bv 
Wadsworth. Howland & Co. (See list of Dis- 
tributing -Agents on page 30.) 

GHdden's Concrete Floor Dressing, sold on Pa- 
cific Coast by Whittier. Coburn Company, San 
Francisco, and Tibbetts-OIdfield Co., Los An- 
geles. 

"Federal Steel Cement Hardener" manufac- 
tured by Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleve- 
land, represented bv E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement, page 26.) 

CEMENT TESTS— CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
Robert W. Hunt & Co., 251 Kearny St., San 
Francisco. 

CHURCH INTERIORS 

Fink & Schindler, 2iS 13th St., San Francisco. 

CHUTES— GRA\'ITY SPIRAL 

Gravity Spiral Chutes bv Minnesota Manufac- 
turers' Association. G. E. Sturgis, Agt., 602 



111 New 



rd St., San 



Spreckels 



Santa Ma 
•, San Fr; 



CEMENT MORTAR HARDENER 

"Federal Steel Cement Hardener" manufac- 
tured by Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleve- 
land, represented by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement, page 26.) 

COLD STORAGE PLANTS 

Vulcan Iron Works. San Francisco. 
T. P. Jarvis Crude Oil Burning Co., 275 Con- 
necticut St., San Francisco. 
CLOCKS— TOWER 

Decker Electrical Construction C 
Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

CO.MPOSITION FLOORING 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Ho 
Francisco. 

COMPRESSED AIR CLEANERS 

The B. St W. Stationary Vacuum Cleane 

by Arthur T. Riggs, 510 CI, 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Excello Stationary Vacuum Cle 

Schaer Co., Pacific Coast Agts., 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Giant Stationary Suction Cleane 

Cisco and Oakland. 
Invincible Vacuum Cleaner, sold by R. W. 

Foyle, 149 New Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. _ 
Tuec. mfrd. by L'nited Electric Company, Coast 

Branch, General Contractors' Association, San 

Francisco. 
CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

American Concrete Co., Humboldt Bank Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Clinton Fireproofing Co., Mutual Bank Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
McKibben & Taylor, 2125 Shattuck Ave., Berke- 

Otto.'w. H.. 269 Park Ave., San Jose. 

F'oster, vogt Co., Sharon Bldg., San Francisco. 

P. A. Palmer, Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco. 

Ransome Concrete Co., Oakland and Sacra- 
mento. 

International Concrete Construction Company, 
West Berkeley. Cal. 
CONCRETE HARDENERS 

"Federal Steel Concrete Hardener." mfd. by 
Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleveland, Ohio, 
sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See ad., p. 26.) 
CONCRETE MACHINERY 

Garfield ^Nlvers. factory representative of Insley 
Manufacturing Company, and Marsh-Capron 
Company. Hearst Bldg., San Francisco. 
CONCRETE MIXERS 

Austin Improved Cube Mixer. Factory branch. 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco. 

Foote Mixers sold by Edw. R. Bacon, 40 Na- 
toma St., San Francisco. 
CONCRETE PILES 

McArthur Concrete Pile Company. Chronicle 
Building, San Francisco. 



Underwriters' Label- 
led Fire Doors and 
Windows — Kalamein 
Interior Metal Doors 
and Trim — Metal 
Corner Bead — Metal 
Furniture, etc. 



Capitol Sheet Metal Works 

Manufacturer of '^'^'- ^ 

SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 

San Francisco Office and Factory, 1927-1935 MARKET STREET 
Oakland Office and Factory, 117-119 FRANKLIN STREET 



10 



The Architect and Engineer 



Telephone Sutter 4755 



QASPARD <& HAA4MOIND 

BUILDIIVa COrSSTRUCTIOIN 

425 Sharon Building, 55 New Montgomery St. San Francisco, Cal. 



sold by Woods & Huddart, 444 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFI 

CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT 

United States Steel Products Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles, Portland and Seattle. 

Clinton Welded Reinforcing System, L. A. Nor- 
ris, 140 Townsend St., San Francisco. 

"Kahn System," see advertisement on page 31. 
this issue. 

International Fabric & Cable, represented bv 
Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Triangle Mesh Fabric. Sales Agents, Pacific 
Buildmg Materials Co., 523 Market St., San 
Francisco. 

Twisted Bars 
Market St., 
CONCRETE SURFACING 

"Biturine." sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 
California St., San Francisco. 

"Concreta" sold by W. P. Fuller & Co., San 
rrancisco. 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co.'s Bay State Brick 
and Cement Coating, sold by R. N. Nason & 
Co., ban Francisco and Los Angeles. 

Glidden Liquid Cement, manufactured by Glid- 
den Varnish Co.. Whittier, Coburn Co.. San 

CONTRACTORS, GENERAL 

American Concrete Co., Humboldt Bank Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Arthur W. Biggers, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Collman, 526 Sharon Bldg., San 



Colln._.. _ 

Francisco. 

Construction 

Fran 



& Engineering Co., Hobart Bldg., 
--. Cisco. 

M. Fisher, California-Pacific Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Foster, Vogt Co., Sharon Bldg., San Francisco 

Gaspard & Hammond. Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. (See card above.) 

Howard S. Williams, Hearst Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Lester Stock, 12 Geary St., San Francisco. 

McLaren & Peterson, Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

R. W. Mnller. 185 Stevenson St.. San Francisco 

John Monk. 2016 Vallejo St., San Francisco 

Monson Bros., 1907 Bryant St.. San Francisco 

Burt T. Owsley, 311 Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Ransome Concrete Co., 1218 Broadway. Oakland. 

Western Building & Engineering Co., 455 Phelan 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Williams Bros. & Henderson, Holbrook Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
CORK FLOORING 

"Linotile." manufactured by Armstrong Cork & 
Insulation Company. M. C. Van Fleet, agt., 
120 Jessie St., San Francisco. 
CORNER BAR 

Dolbear Curb Bar, manufactured by American 
S^j"^' J^"" S°-' '"•''' Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., ban Francisco. 
CORNER BEAD 

United States M'etal Products Co., 525 Market 
St., San Francisco.; 750 Keller St., San Fran- 



CATION INDEX-Contlnucpd 

CRUSHED ROCK 

Grant Gravel Cc. Flat Iron Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Niles Rock, sold by California Building Ma- 
terial Company, new Call Bldg., San Francisco. 

Niles Sand, Gravel & Kock Co., Mutual Bank 
Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 
Francisco. 
DAMP-PROOFING COMPOUND 

Biturine Co. of America, 24 California St., 
San Francisco. 

Glidden's Liquid Rubber, sold on Pacific Coast 
by Whittier, Coburn Company, San Fran- 
Imperial Co., 183 Stevenson St.. San Francisco. 

"Impervite." sold by E. A. BuUis & Co. (See 
adv. on page 26.) 

Trus-Con Damp Proofing. (See advertisement 
of Trussed Concrete Steel Company for Coast 
agencies.) 

"Pabco" Damp Proofing Compound, sold by 
Paraffine Paint Co., 34 First St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co., Inc., 84 Washing- 
ton St., Boston. (See Adv. for Coast agen- 
cies.) 
DOOR HANGERS 

McCabe Hanger Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y. 

Pitcher Hanger, sold by National Lumber Co., 
Fifth and Brvant Sts., San Francisco. 

Reliance Hanger, sold by Sartorius Co., San 
Francisco; D. F. Fryer & Co.. Louis R. Be- 
dell. Los Angeles, and Portland Wire & Iron 
Works. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Haws Sanitary Fountain, 1808 Harmon St., 
Berkeley, and C. F. Weber & Co.. San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 

N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Company, San Francisco, Oakland, and 



Los An 



War 



67 Ne 



■ific Po 
ery St., San F 
DUMB WAITERS 
Spencer Elevator 

Francisco. 
Burdett-Rowntree Mfg. Co, 
San Francisco. 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Butte Engineering Co., 683 Howard St 



itgon 



Company, 173 Beale St., San 
Underwood Bldg., 



F.-a 



Co., 



San 
San 



St., San Francisco. 
0., 507 Montgomery 



Central Electr 
Francisco. 

Scott Co., Inc., 243 Mil 

Pacific Fire Extinguishe 

St., San Francisco. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 

Chas. T. Phillips, Pacific Bldg., San 
ELECTRIC PLATE WARMER 

The Prometheus Electric Plate Warmer for 
residences, clubs, hotels, etc. Sold by M. E. 
Hammond, Humboldt Bank Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 
ELEVATORS 

Otis Elevator Company, Stockton and North 
Point, San Francisco. 



MORTENSON CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CONTRACTORS FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL AND IRON 

H. MORTENSON. Pres. CHAS. G. MORTENSON, VicePres. and Mgr. 

OFFICE AND SHOPS: CORNER 1 9TH AND Indiana Streets 

"hones: Mission S033— Home M 3916 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



The Architect and Engineer 



"FIBRESTONE" 



SANITARY FLOORING, WAINSCOT AND BASE, gg^- Laid Exclusively by 

FIBRESTONE & ROOFING CO., 971 Howard St. !?e"|uTt"/rlM 



ARCHITECTS" SPECIFICATION INDEX-Continued 



ELEVATORS— Continued. 

Spencer Elevator Company, 126 Bealc St., Sa 



an Francisco Elevator C 
San Francisco, 
'acific Gurney Elevator Co 



860 Folsom St., 
86 Fifth St., San 



ELEVATORS, SIGNALS, FLASHLIGHTS AND 
DIAL INDICATORS 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co., Underwood Bldg., 



ELEVATOR ENCLOSURES 

J. G. Braun, 615-6J1 S. Paulina St.. Chicago, 
ENGINEERS 

F. J. Amweg, 700 Marston Bldg., San Fr 

Cisco. 
V/. W. Breite, Clunie Bldg., San Franc 
L. M. Hausmann, Sharon Bldg., San Fr 
Chas. T. Phillips. Pacific Bldg., San Fr 
Hunter & Hudson, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 
EXPRESS CALL SYSTEM 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co., Underwood 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
FIRE EXIT DEVICES 

Von Duprin Self-Releasing Fire Exit Devices, 
Vonnegut Hardware Co. (See Adv. for Coast 
Agencies.) 
FIRE ESCAPES 

Burnett Iron Works, Fresno, Cal. 
Pacific Structural Iron Works, Structural Iron 
and Steel, Fire Escapes, etc. Phone Market 
13?4; Home J. 3435. 370-84 Tenth St., San 
Francisco. 
Palm Iron & Bridge Works, Sacramento. 
Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

Scott Company, 243 Minna St.. San Francisco. 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 
FIRE BRICK 

Livermore Fire Brick Co., Livermore, Cal. 
FIREPLACE DAMPER 

Head, Throat and Damper for open fireplaces. 
Colonial Fireplace Co.. Chicago. (See adver- 
tisement for Coast agencies.) 
FIREPROOFING AND PARTITIONS 

Gladdin?, McBean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co., Frost Bldg., 
Los Angeles. 
FIXTURES— BANK, OFFICE, STORE. ETC. 
A. J. Forbes & Son, 1530 Filbert St., San Fran- 
Fink & Schindler, 218 13th St., San Francisco. 
C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco and 210 N. Main St., Los Angeles. Cal. 
T. H. Meek Co., 1157 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
FLAG POLES— TACKLE. ETC. 

Pacific Foundry Company, Harrison and ISth 
Sts., San Francisco. 
FLOOR VARNISH 

Bass-Hueter and San Francisco Pioneer Varnish 
Works, 816 Mission St., San Francisco. 



FLOOR \.\RXISir— Continued. 

R. N. Nason & Co., 151 Potrero Ave., San 

Francisco. 
Standard Varnish Works, Chicago, New York 

and San Francisco. 
Glidden Products, sold by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
San Francisco. 
FLOORING— MAGNESITE 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 
FLUMES 

California Corrugated Culvert Co., West Berk- 
eley, Cal. 
GARAGE EQUIPMENT 

Bowser Gasoline Tanks and Outfit, Bowser S 
Co., 612 Howard St.. San Francisco. 
GARDEN FURNITURE 

G. Tomagnini & Co., 219 Tenth St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
O. S. Sarsi, 12.1 Oak St.. San Francisco. 
GAS GENERATORS 

Utility Gas Generator Co., 340 Sansome St., 
San Francisco. 
GLASS . , ^ 

W. P. Fuller & Company, all principal Coast 

cities. 
Whittier-Coburn Co., Howard & Beale Sts., San 
Francisco. 



lite Co., Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 
1 and Potrero Sts., 



GRANITE 

California 
Cisco. 

Raymond Granite Co.. Divi 
San Francisco. 
GRAX'EL. SAND AND CRUSHED ROCK 

California Building Material Co., new Call Bldg., 
:=an Francisco. 

Del Monte White Sand, sold by Pacific Improve- 
ment Co.. Crocker Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Grant Gravel Co., Flatiron Bldg., San Fran- 

Nilcs Sand, Gravel & Rock Co., Mutual Savings 
Bank Bldg., 704 Market St.. San Francisco. 
GR.WITY CHUTES „ „ ^ 

Gravity Spiral Chutes, sold by G. E. Sturgis 
Supply House, 602 Mission St., San Francisco. 

HARDWALL PLASTER ^ ^ 

Henry CoweU Lime & Cement Co., San Francisco. 
American Keene Cement Co.. 333 Monadnock 

Bldg.. San Francisco. 
"Empire" Hardwall Plaster, Pacific Portland 

Cement Company, Pacific Bldg., San Fran- 

HARDWARE 

Russwin Hardware, Joost Bros., San Francisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Company. San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Los Angeles and 
San Diego. 

Sargent's Hardware, sold by Bennett Bros., 514 
Market St., San Francisco. ,.£.,:. 

Western Brass Mfg. Co.. 217 Tehama St.. S. F. 




; Cabinets and Mirrors are the last word 
Sweet's 1914 Catalog. Pages 1054-1055 c 



•■White-Steel" Medicii 
Bathroom Equipment. Se 
full information. 

"WHITE-STEEL" SANITARY FURNITURE CO. 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Northern California Southern California 

Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co. H. R. Boynton Company 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 



12 



The Architect and Engineer 



Clarence E. Musto. Fri 



. Keenan. VicePn 



UuiDoJ. Musto, Sec'y & Trc 



JOSEPH MUSTO SONS=KEENAN CO. 



Phone Franklin 
C»36S 



MARBLE 



OFFICE AND MILLS: 

535-565 North Point St., 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFI 

HARDWOOD FLOORING 

Parrott & Co., 320 California St., San Francisco 
White Bros., Cor. Fifth and Brannan Sts., San 

Francisco. 
Hardwood Interior Co., 554 Bryant St., San 

Francisco. 
HARDWOOD LUMBER 

Dieckmann Hardwood Co., Beach and Taylor 

Sts., San Francisco. 
Parrott & Co., 320 California St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
White Bros., Cor. Fifth and Brannan Sts., San 

Francisco. 
HEATERS— AUTOMATIC 

Pittsburg Water Heater Co., 237 Powell St., 

San Francisco. 
Hoffman Heaters, factory branch, 397 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 
HEATING AND VENTILATING 

American Heat & Power Co., Oakland, Cal. 
J. M. Boscus, 975 Howard St.. San Francisco. 
Fess System Co., 220 Natoma St., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter. Inc., 507 Mission St., San 

Francisco. 
Charles T. Phillips, Pacific Building, San Fran- 
Scott Company, 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 
Wittman. Lyman & Co., 341 Minna St., San 

Francisco. 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 

St., San Francisco. 
Petcrsenjames Co., 710 Larkin St., San Fran- 

HOLLOW BLOCKS 

Denison Hollow Interlocking Blocks, 310 Ochs- 
ner Bldg., Sacramento, and Chamber of Com- 
merce Bldg., Portland. 
INGOT IRON 

".\rmco" brand, manufactured by .\merican 
Rolling Jlill Company, Middletown, Ohio. 
INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 

Robert W. Hunt & Co., 251 Kearny St., San 



CATION index-Co 

M.VRBLE— Continued. 
G. Tomagnini & Co., I 



IRONING BOARDS 






M'erritt Patent Ironing Board, sold by 


A 


Hom- 


mel, agent. Atlanta Hotel, San Fran 


rise 




JOIST HANGERS 






Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 N 


w 


Mont- 


gomery St., San Francisco. 






KEENE CEMENT 






American Keene Cement Co., Monadnc 


ck 


Pld?., 








LIME 






Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Co., 9 


Via 


n St., 


San Francisco. 






LIGHT, HEAT AND POWER 






Pacific Gas & Elec. Co., 445 Sutter 


St 


, San 


Francisco. 






LUMBER 






Dudfield Lumber Co., Palo Alto, Cal. 






Sunset Lumber Co., Oakland, Cal. 






Santa Fe Lumber Co., Seventeenth and 


De 


Haro 



Sts., San 

E. K. Wood lAiniber Company, East Oakland, 
California. 
MILL WORK 

Totten & Brandt Planing Mill Co., Stockton. 
Taylor & Co., 2001 Grand St., Alameda. 
Dudfield Lumber Co., Palo Alto, Cal. 
MAIL CHUTES 

Cutler Mail Chute Co., Rochester, N. Y. (See 
Adv. on naee 38 for Coast representatives.) 
MANTELS 

Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran- 



MARBLE 

Colorado Yule i 

San Francisco. 

Joseph Musto Sons-Keenai 

Point St., San Francisco. 



Co., Monadnock 



Bldg., 
North 



19 Tenth St., Sa 



MEDICINE CABINETS 

White Steel Sanitary Furniture Co., rep. by 
Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 
METAL AND STEEL LATH 

"Steelcrete" Expanded Metal Lath, sold by 
HoUoway Expanded Metal Company, Monad- 
nock Bldg.. San Francisco. 
L. A. Norris & Co., 140 Townsend St., San 
Francisco. 
METAL CEILINGS 

San Francisco Metal Stamping & Corrugating 
Co., 2269 Folsom St., San Francisco. 
METAL DOORS AND WINDOWS 

U. S. Metal Products Co., 525 Market St., San 



Dahlstr 



Metallic Door Co., Western office, 
G. West Co., 353 Market St., San 



METAL FURNITURE 

M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San Francisco. 

Chas. M. Finch, 311 Board of Trade Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Capitol Sheet Metal Works, San Francisco and 
Oakland. 
METAL SHINGLES 

Meurer Bros., 630 Third St., San Francisco. 

San Francisco Metal Stamping & Corrugating 
Co., 2269 Folsom St., San Francisco. 
MORTAR COLORS 

Dry Mineral Dyes, sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. 
(See adv., page 26.) 
OIL BURNERS 

American Heat & Power Co., Seventh and Cedar 
Sts., Oakland. 

S. T. Johnson Co. (see adv. belowl. 

Fess System Co., 220 Natoma St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

T. P. Jarvis Crude Oil Burner Co., 275 Con- 
necticut St., San Francisco. 




Crude Oil Burners Operating Kitchen Ranges in 

Government Barracks at Fort Winfield Scott 

OIL BURNERS 

Modern EQUIPMENTS for 

Cooking and Heating Plants 

S. T. JOMNSOIN CO. 

1337 MISSION ST. 94S GRACE AVE. 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 



The Architect and Engineer 



13 



MADE IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PASSENGER ^FREIGHT ELEVATORS 



INVESTIQATE OUR PRODUCT 



SPENCER ELEVATOR COMPANY 



126-128 Beale Street, SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 664 



ARCHITECTS- SPECIFICATION INDEX-Cont.nued 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC.— Continued. 



ana Sts.. 
ard St., 
19th and Mil 



ORNAMENTAL IRON AND BRONZE 

American Art Metal Works, 13 Grace St., San 
Francisco. 

Erode Iron Works. 31-37 Hawthorne St., San 
Francisco. 

Burnett Iron Works, Fresno. 

Palm Iron & Bridge Works, Sacramento. 

California Artistic Metal & Wire Co., 349 Sev- 
enth St., San Francisco. 

J. G. Braun, Chicago and New 

Ralston Iron Works, 20th and Ii 
Francisco. 

Monarch Iron Works. 1165 Hi 
Francisco. 

C. J. Hillard Company, In 
sota Sts., Sain Francisco. 

Shreiber & Sons Co., represented by Western 
Builders Supply Co., San Francisco 

West Coast Wire & Iron Works. 861-S63 How- 
ard St.. San Francisco. 

Vulcan Iron Works. San Francisco. 
PAINTING AND DECORATING 

D. Zelinsky, 564 Eddy St., San Francisco. 
Robert Swan, 1133 E. 12th St., Oakland. 

PAINT FOR BRIDGES . ,, ^ ,.- • 

Biturine Company of America, 24 Lalilorma 
St., San Francisco. 
PAINT FOR CEMENT 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworth, Howland S: Co. (Inc.). (See Adv. 
in this issue for Pacific Coast agents.) 
"Biturine," sold by Buturine Co. of America, 

24 California St., San Francisco. 
Trus-Con Stone Tex., Trussed Concrete Steel 

Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
Glidden's Liquid Cement, sold on Pacihc Coast 
by Whittier, Coburn Company, San Francisco 
and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los Angeles. 
Concreto Cement Coating, manufactured by the 
Muralo Company, 540 Valencia St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston. Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 
"Technola." a cement paint, sold by C. Roman, 
San Francisco. 
PAINT FOR STEEL STRUCTURES 

"Biturine," sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 

California St., San Frandsco. 
Carbonizing Coating. Made by Goheen Mfg. 
Co., Canton, Ohio. C. W. Coburn & Co., 320 
Market St., San Francisco, and A. J. Capron, 
Ainsworth Bldg., Portland, Agents. 
Trus.Con Bar-Ox, Trussed Concrete Steel Co. 

(See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
Glidden's Acid Proof Coating, sold on Pacific 
Coast by Whittier, Coburn Company, San 
Francisco, and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los An- 
geles. 
PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Bass-Heuter Paint Co., Mission, near Fourth 

St., San Francisco. 
Whittier-Coburn Co., Howard and Beale Sts., 
San Francisco. 



Bldg., San 



ond St., 



717 Market St., San Fran- 
SALT GLAZED TERRA 



W. P. Fuller & Co., all principal Coast cities. 
"Biturine," sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 

California St., San Francisco. 
Glidden Varnish Co., Cleveland, Ohio, repre- 
sented by Whittier-Coburn Co., San Francisco 
and Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., Los Angeles. 
Paraffine Paint Co., 38-40 First St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
R. N. Nason Co.. 
Standard Varnisl 
Francisco. 
PAVING BRICK 

California Brick Company, Phel; 
Francisco. 
PHOTO ENGRAVING 

California Photo Engraving Co., 121 S 
San Francisco. 
PHOTOGRAPHY 
R. J. Waters Co. 
Cisco. 
PIPE— VITRIFIED 
COTTA 

Gladding, McBean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 

Francisco. _ , 

Pacific Sewer Pipe Co.. I. W. Hellman Bldg., 

Los Angeles. 
Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works. Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
PLASTER CONTRACTORS 

,A Knowles. 985 Folsom St.. San Francisco. 
C. C. Morehouse. Crocker Bldg.. San Francisco. 
.1. J. Connolly S: Son, Builders' Exchange, San 
Francisco. 
PLUMBERS' MARBLE HARDWARE 

Western Brass Mfg. Co., 217 Tehama St., S. F. 
PLUMBING 

Boscus Bros., 975 Howard St., San Francisco. 
Scott Co., Inc., 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 
Peterson-James Co., 710 L? ■"kin St., San Fran- 

Wittman, Lyman & Co., 341 Minna St., onn 

Francisco. 
Alex Coleman, 706 Ellis St., San FranciscO- 
PLU.MBING FIXTURES. M.\TERIALS, ETC. 
Crane Co., Second and Brannan Sts., San Fran- 
cisco. 
N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 

Francisco. 
C.-ilifornia Steam Plumbing Supply Co., 671 

Fifth St., San Francisco. 
J. L. Mott Iron Works, D. H. Gulick, selling 

agent, 133 Kearnv St.. San Francisco. 
Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Co., 67 New 

Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Western States Porcelain Co., San Pablo, Cal. 
POTTERY ,„ , ,,.„ 

Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
PUMPS 

Chicago Pump Company, 612 Howard street, 

San Francisco. 



HERE IT IS 



MADE IN CALIFORNIA, TOO ! 

A High Class Washable Paint for Inside Walls. 

OPAQUE FLAT FINISH 

Less material required to cover surface than any similar product on the market. 

R. N. NASON & CO., [T-T.irnTsTrTA SAN FRANCISCO 



14 



The Architect and Engineer 



Phone Lakeside 91 



INational Roofing: Company 

DAMP-PROOFING AND COMPOSITION FLOORING 
EVERYTHING IN ROOFING 

Rooms 206-207 PLAZA BUILDING, Fifteenth and Washington Streets, OAKLAND 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX-Contjnued 



REFRIGERATORS 

McCray Refrigerators, sold by Nathan Dohr 
mann Co., Geary and Stockton Sts., San Fran 
Cisco. 
Vulcan Iron Works, San Francisco. 
REVERSIBLE WINDOWS 

Hauser Reversible Window Company, BalboE 
Bldg., San Francisco, 
RE\"OLVING DOORS 

Van Kennel Doors, sold by U. S. Metal Prod 
ucts Co., 525 Market St., San Francisco. 
ROCK BREAKING MACHINERY 

Vulcan Iron Works, Francisco and Kearny Sts. 
San Francisco. 
ROLLING DOORS, SHUTTERS, PARTITIONS, 
ETC. 

Pacific Building Materials Co., 523 Market St. 

San Francisco . 
C. _F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran 

Kinnea'r Steel Rolling Doors, W. W. Thurston, 
agent, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 

Wilson's Steel Rolling Doors, U. S. Metal Prod 
ucts Co., San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
ROOFING AND ROOFING MATERIALS 

Biturine Co. of America, 24 California St., San 
Francisco. 

Grant Gravel Co., Flat Iron Bldg., San Fran- 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

National Roofing Company, Plaza Bldg., Oak- 
land. 

"Ruberoid," manufactured by Paraffine Paint 
Co., San Francisco, 

Mackenzie Roof Co., 425 15th St., Oakland. 

United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 
ROOFING TIN 

American Sheet & Tin Plate Co., Pacific Coast 
representatives, U. S. Steel Products Co., San 
Francisco, Los Angeles. Portland and Seattle. 

Meurer Bros., A. H. MacDonald, agent, 630 
Third St., San Francisco. 
SAFES, VAULTS, BANK EQUIPMENT 

M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San Francisco. 
SANITARY DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St.. San 
Francisco. 

Haws' Sanitary Drinking Faucet Co., 1808 Har- 
mon St.. Berkeley. 
SANITARY BATH FIXTURE 

"Boudoir" bath tub, mfrd. by Improved Sanitary 
Fixture Co., 411 S. Los Angeles St., Los 
Angeles. Sold by all plumbing houses. 
SANITARY KITCHEN SINK 

Improved Sanitary Fixture Company. 411 S. 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles. 
SASH CORD 

Regal Sash Cord, Louisville Selling Co. repre- 
sented on Pacific Coast by Baker & Hamilton. 

Samson Cordage Works, manufacturers of Solid 
Braided Cords and Cotton Twines, 88 Broad 
St., Boston, Mass. 



SCENIC PAINTING— DROP CURTAINS, ETC 
The Edwin H. Flagg Scenic Co., 1638 Long 
Beach Ave.. Los Angeles. 
SCHOOL FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco: 512 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 
SEWAGE EJECTORS 

Chicago Pump Co., represented by Telephone 
Electric Equipment Co., 612 Howard street, 
San Francisco. 
SHEATHING AND SOUND DEADENING 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 
SHEET METAL WORK. SKYLIGHTS. ETC. 
Capitol Sheet Metal Works, 1927 Market St., 

San Francisco. 
U. S. Metal Products Co., 525 Market St., San 
Francisco. 
SHINGLE STAINS 

Cabot's Creosote Stains, sold by Waterhouse & 
Price, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Port- 
land. 
STEEL AND IRON— STRUCTURAL 
Burnett Iron Works, Fresno, Cal. 
Central Iron Works, 621 Florida St., San Fran- 
Dyer Eros., 17th and Kansas Sts., San Fran- 
Brode iron Works, 31 Hawthorne St.. San Fran- 

Judson Manufacturing Co., 819 Folsom St., San 

Francisco. 
Mortenson Construction Co., 19th and Indiana 

Sts., San Francisco. 
J. L. Mott Iron Works, D. H. Gulick, agents, 

135 Kearny St.. San Francisco. 
Pacific Rolling Mills, I7th and Mississippi Sts., 

San Francisco. 
Pacific Structural Iron Works, Structural Iron 

and Steel. Fire Escapes, etc. Phone Market 

1374; Home. J. 3435, 370-84 Tenth St., San 

Francisco. 
Palm Iron & Bridge Works, Sacramento. 
Ralston Iron Works, Twentieth and Indiana Sts., 



U. S. Steel Products Co., Rialto Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Schreiber & Sons Co., represented by Western 

Builders Supply Co., S. F. 
Vulcan Iron Works. San Francisco. 
Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 



Woods & Huddart, 444 Market St., Sa 



Fran 



Cisco. 



■ STEEL PRESERVATIVES 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 

St., San Francisco. 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co.. Boston Mass. (See 
Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
STEEL BARS FOR CONCRETE 

Kahn and Rib Bars, made by Trussed Concrete 

Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
Woods £ Huddart, 444 Market St., San Fran- 



CALIFORNIA ARTISTIC METAL & WIRE CQ 

J.T.MCCORMICK- Pnesident 

ORNAMENTAL IRON & BRONZE WORK 

34-9-365 SEVENTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO. 

TEUEPHONE : MARKET 2162 



The Architect and Engineer 



15 



Mr. Architect — 

If You are Designing a Home 
for a Lady Client w^hom You 
Want to be Satisfied 

Would You — 

— Avoid fouling the sink and dish- 

water? 

— Avoid staining and scouring the 

sink? 

— Prevent clogging the drain pipe? 

— Save her hands from hot greasy 

dishwater? 

— Save many minutes, much scrap- 

ing, picking and drudgery, after 
each meal, every day in the year? 
If you would avoid all these un- 
pleasantries specify 

THE "HELP-HER" IMPROVED SANITARY KITCHEN SINK 

Is furnished in sizes to replace common sinks. No extra space or Plumbing required. 

Apply to your Plumber or write 

IMPROVED SANITARY FIXTURE CO. 

TELEPHONE F 2964 

411 So. Los Angeles St. LOS ANGELES, CAL 





Burden Rou-nlree Pneuttiatic Door Operating Devu 



BURDETT 
ROWNTREE 
MFG. CO. 



Dumbwaiters 

Door Operating Devices 

Elevator Interlocks 

323 Underwood Building, 
525 Market Street 

Phone Douglas 2898 

San Francisco, - - Cal. 




Norton Elevator Door CI 



ELEVATOR 
SUPPLY & 
REPAIR CO. 

Elevator Signals 
Elevator Accessories 
Norton Door Closers 

323 Underwood Building, 
525 Market Street 

Phone Douglas 2898 

San Francisco, - - Cal. 



16 



The Architect and Engineer 



G. TOMAGNINI & CO. 

ARTISTIC and INDUSTRIAL MARBLE WORK 

Statuary, Monuments, Mantels, Architectural Work. Garden and Hall Furniture 

219-239 TENTH ST. Phone Market 800S SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX-Continued 



STEEL iMOl'LDINCS FOR STORE FRONTS 

J. c;. liraun. 615-6J1 S. Paulina St., Chicago. 111. 
STEEL FIREPROOF WINDOWS 

United States Metal Products Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 
STEEL STLTDDING 

Collins Steel Partition. Parrott & Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 
STEEL ROLLING DOORS 

Kinnear Steel Rolling Door Co.. W. W. Thurs- 
ton, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 
STEEL WHEELP.ARROWS 

Champion and California steel brands, made by 
Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
STONE 

California Granite Co., 518 Sharon Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Boise Sandstone Co., Boise, Idaho. 
Raymond Granite Co., Potrero Ave. and Division 

St., San Francisco. 
Colusa Sandstone Co., Potrero Ave. and Di- 
vision St., San Francisco. 
STORAGE SYSTEMS 

S. F. Bowser & Co., 612 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 
SURETY BONDS 

Globe Indemnity Co., Insurance Exchange Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
H. Y. MacMeans & Co., Monadnock Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
J. B. Nabors & Sons, Kohl Bldg.. San Francisco. 
Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, Mills Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Pacific Coast Casualty Co., Merchants' Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
THEATER AND OPERA CHAIRS 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT 

Telephone Electric Equipment Co., 612 Howard 
St., San Francisco. 
TILES, MOSAICS, MANTELS. ETC. 

California Tile Contracting Company, 206 Shel- 
don Bldg., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
The Mosaic Tile Co., 230 Eighth St., San Fran- 

TILE FOR ROOFING 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 H 



Gladding, McBean & Co., Cr 



rd St., San 
cker Bldg., San 
Bldg., San Fran- 



United Materials Co., Crossley 
Cisco. 
TILE WALLS— INTERLOCKING 

Denison Hollow Interlocking Blocks, Ochsner 
Bldg., Sacramento. 
TIN PLATES 

American Tin Plate Co., Riato Bldg., San Fran- 

VITREO'US CHINAWARE 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Company, 67 New !M'ont- 

gomery St., San Francisco. 
Western States Porcelain Co., Richmond. Cal. 
VACUUM CLEANERS 

Giant Stationary Suction Cleaner, manufactured 

by Giant Suction Cleaner Co., 731 Folsom 

St., San Francisco and Third and Jefferson 

Sts., Oakland. 
Invincible X'acuum Cleaner, R. W. Foyle, 

Agent. San Francisco. 
"Excell»" Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, F. W. 

Schaer Bros., Pacific Coast agents, Santa 

Maria Bldg., San Francisco. 
"Tuec" Air Cleaner, manufactured by United 

Electric Co.. 110 Jessie St., San Francisco. 



\'.\Cfl'M CLE.VNERS— Continued. 

B. & W. Station,iry Vacuum Cleaner, sold by 

Arthur T. Riggs, 510 Claus Spreckels Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
VALVES 

Jenkins Bros., 247 Mission St., San Francisco. 
VAL\'E PACKING 

"Palmetto Twist," sold bv H. N. Cook Belling 

Co.. 317 Howard St., San Francisco. 
VARNISHES 

W. P. Fuller Co., all principal Coast cities. 
Glidden Varnish Co., Cleveland, O., represented 

on the Pacific Coast by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
San Francisco. 
Standard \arnish Works, 113 Front St., San 

Francisco. 
S. F. Pioneer Varnish Works, 816 Mission St., 

San Francisco. 
Moller & Schumann Co., Hilo Varnishes, 1022-24 

Mission St., San Francisco. 
R. N. Nason & Co., San Francisco and Los An- 



WALL BEDS 

Marshall & Stearns Co., 1154 Phelan Bldg., San 
Francisco. 
WALL BOARD 

Bishopric Wall Board sold bv I. E. Thaver St 
Co., San Francisco, and Central Door & 
Lumber Co., Portland, Oregon. 
WALL SAFES 

Lowrie Wall Safe, sold by C. Roman Co., 173 
Jessie St., San Francisco. 
WATERPROOFING FOR CONCRETE, BRICK, 
ETC. 

"Impervile." sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (Sec 
adv. on page 26.) 

Concreto Cement Coating, manufactured by the 
Muralo Co. (See page 124.) 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Glidden's Concrete Floor Dressing and Liquid 
Cement Enamel, sold on Pacific Coast by 
Whittier Coburn Company. San Francisco. 

Imperial Co., 183 Stevenson St., San Francisco. 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co., Inc. (See Adv. for 
Coast agencies.) 
WHITE ENAMEL FINISH 

"Gold Seal," manufactured and sold by Bass- 
Hueter Paint Company. All principal Coast 
cities. 

"Satinette," Standard Varnish Works, 113 Front 
St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Sno-wite. manufactured by Trussed 
CToncrete Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast dis- 
tributors. 
WINDOWS— REVERSIBLE, ETC. 

Perfection Reversible Window Co., 2025 Market 
St., San Francisco. 

Whitney Adjustable Window Co., San Fran- 
cisco. (See page 35.) 

Hauser Reversible Window Co., Balboa Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
WINDOW SHADES 

Top Light Shade Co., 737 Market St., Oakland. 
WIRE FABRIC 

U. S. Steel Products Co., Rialto Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

L. A. Norris Co., 140 Townsend St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
WOOD MANTELS 

Fink & Schindler, 218 13th St., San Francisco. 

Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran- 



Tlic Architect and Enzinccr 



iiiinilyen An Old Home Can 
A Modern Rnish 

Styles change in homes just as they do in dress. 

Today most of the interior woodwork has a flat finish — 
that is, without lustre. 

There are two ways to get this effect. One is to apply a varnish 
and then rub it down with pumice and water; but it is a hard 
task and costly. 

The other way — an easier way — is to use 




Hueter's Matt Lac 



This is a preparation for producing a rubbed effect on all classes of woodwork without the 
labor or expense. 

It dries with a soft even matt finish, yet is tough and durable — will not mar or scratch. 
It can be used over a stain, shellac or varnish. 

Why not make over your dining room — give it this new flat finish? Possibly you can do 
the work yourself — we will be glad to give you full instructions. 

If preferable, engage a painter. Have him use Hueter's Matt Lac and the work can be 
done very economically as he saves the cost of labor in rubbing down a varnislied surface. 

If you are planning a new home see that your architect specifies 
Hueter's Matt Lac for the rooms where you wish a flat or dull finish. 
It is double economy — saves rubbing expense and seldom requires a 
new coat. 

Our reason for recommending Hueter's Matt Lac is simply this: 

It is durable — dries with a beautiful finish — stands the 
wear — a little of it covers a large surface — and it is the 
best preparation for the purpose ever made. 

BASS-HUETER PAINT CO. 

816 Mission Street 1564 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Portland Los Angeles Seattle 




18 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 



ROYAL FLUSH VALVES 




are rapidly supplanting all other meth- 
ods of flushing water closets, urinals 
and slop sinks. 

Flushing same quantity of water 
each operation of handle, no waste — 
noiseless. Write for catalog. 

N. O.NELSON MFG. CO. 

steam and Plumbing Supplies 

San Francisco Warehouse and Office: 
978 Howard St., Tel Kearny 4970 

LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO 



SCHAER BROS. 

Factory Representatives 

Excello Vacuum Machines 
Eclipse Stoves and Ranges 
Radke Hot Water Heaters 



We cordially invite you to visit our 
demonstrating room, 

173 JESSIE STREET 

(Ground Floor) 

0pp. Builders' Exchange, near Third Street 

Phone Kearny 4728 



C. ROMAN CO. 

SPKIALTY PAINT MANUfACTURERS 

173 JESSIE ST., 0pp. Builders Exchange 
WE MANUFACTURE 

"TECHNOLA" 

A ZINC PAINT containing Cement 

CUB BRAND 

GILSONITE 

QUICK DRYING BLACK 

SHINGLE STAIN 

BARREL HEAD 

FLAT-GLOSS 

LACQUERS 
GRAPHITE 

PASTE, SEMI-PASTE, LIQUID 

RED LEAD PASTE 
NO-DAMP 

WATER PROOFING 

PASTE COLORS 

HOUSE PAINTS 

WASHABLE WALL 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




■m^^^^x^ 



CITY HALL. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
Bakewell & Brown. Architects. 

For this important structure. Imperial Water- 
proofing is being used by the McGilvray Stone 
Co. for treating the beds and builds of all gran- 
ite and stone work, by a surface application, to 
prevent staining, caused by cement mortar. 

WE SPECIALIZE 

Water Proofing Problems 

Above Ground — Under Ground 

ASSUME ALL RESPONSIBILITY 
GUARANTEE RESULTS 



Imperial Company 

Builders Exchange Building 

183 Stevenson St. San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazii 



The Architect and Engineer 19 



"PAINTS 

for Every Purpose" 



PIONEER WHITE LEAD 
FULLER VARNISHES 
WASHABLE WALL FINISH 
PIONEER SHINGLE STAIN 

Are Manufactured by 

W. P. FULLER & CO. 

San Francisco 

Oakland Portland 

Sacramento Seattle 

Stockton Tacoma 

Los Angeles Spokane 

Long Beach Boise 

Pasadena San Diego 

Factories at South San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers pie 



20 



The Architect and Engineer 



This house water f>roojed 
and beautified wilh Bay 
St^le Brick and Cement 




Keeps Concrete Walls 
Dry as Noah's Ark 



"The Protection and 
Decoration of Cement 
Construction ' ' will tell 
you what Bay State 
Brick and Cement 
Coating is and does. 



Blotched concrete and stucco 
walls after a rain show how the 
water seeps through. This means dampness and, in 
time, disintegration. Insure your house against this. 

Two coats of 

BAY STATE BRICK and CEMENT COATING 

will do it — make your house absolutely weatherproof and improve its 
looks. Bay State Brick and Cement Coating will also enable you to 
get highly artistic effects in white or in color. As an interior finish, 
too. it is without equal. It is Hght-rcflceting and fire retarding. 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND & CO., Inc. 
Paint and Varnish Makers Boston, Mass. 



Safety First 

Cement floors may be given a pennanent non-slippery sur- 
face that will retard absorption and floor dust by using 

Carbitc 



E. A. BULLIS & CO. 

Merchants National Bank Bldg., San Francisco 

Cement Finishing Products 



The .brhitcct and Engineer 

One Leak 



21 



in 1000 Roofs 

The February Storm 

Unequalled in its violence — caused one 
leak in the lOOO Roofs laid in and 
about San Francisco in the past year by 

The Paraffine Paint Co, 

34 First Street, San Francisco 

We do not find that this record has been 
equalled by any company in the West 



The ONLY Background that holds Exterior 
Plaster Permanently and Prevents Cracking 



BISHOPRIC 




This shows the construction of 
stucco or plaster board — Dove- 
tail Lath — damp proof i 
fiber board. 



^^tK^^^ 



Made by the Central Door & Lumber Co., Portland 

STUCCO BOARD — a non-staining spruce 
lath rigidly attached to a fiber board with damp 
proof mastic. ^ Shrinkage Eliminated. 

1. E. THAYER & CO. 

110 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

BISHOPRIC WALL BOARD ALSO IN STOCK 



When writing to Advertii 



please 



22 



The Architect and E^i^inecr 



ARCHITECTS -ATTENTION!!! 




-^-^^ 

Western States 
LAIN Ware Co. 

t PORCELAIN ^' 

-- 1913 ^^' 



For vour SANITARY PORCELALN WARE specify the California product made bv 
the WESTERN STATES PORCELAIN CO. at Richmond, Cal., of the highest grade 
clays by most experienced workmen and the latest .improved machinery', competing in 
quality and prices with the best Eastern goods, thus guaranteeing quick delivery and 
service. Illustrated catalog mailed on request. 

WESTERN STATES PORCELAIN CO. 

HERBERT F. BROWX. President 

Manufacturers of 
PLUMBERS VITREOUS CHINAWARE RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



For Sound and Economical Concrete Specify 

NILES SAND GRAVEL AND ROCK CO.'S 

Sharp Clean Concrete Sand. We carry three sizes 
of Crushed and Screened Concrete Gravel 

Roofing Gravel 



Main OiBce: 
MUTUAL BANK BUILDING 



704 Market St., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2944 





I^B^^^^HH^-j 


HANXOCK GRAMM-^iR SCHOOL 
FACED WITH 60.000 

Red Stock Brick 

Supplied by the 

DIAMOND BRICK CO. 

San Francisco, CaL 

We Sell 

.ARTISTIC CLAY BRICK 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 
Sales Office Telephone 
BALBOA BUILDING Sutter 2987 


^^Z^^'^^^rrHk^lif''''! 



When writing to Advertisers y\c 



The Architect and Engineer 



23 



Established 1902 



•■QUALITY COUNTS" 




15,000 BOOTH ORNAMENTS 

To Architects and Booth Builders 

Save Time and Money 

with best results. 

Ornamental Work, 

in Wood, Plaster, Compo, 
"Fibro" and Iron. 

15,000 Stock Models to choose from. 

Mouldings. Capitals, Brackets, Friezes, Coves, Panels, Shields, Urns, etc., etc., etc. 

Also Special Lighting Fixtures — Standards ^°^I°, ?t°'^'''- 

'T-^ ' \rir •T tryW Quick delivery, whether to order or from stock. 
(I fJlii 'iJliv' 'I// Exclusive Agents — Decorators Supply Co., Chicago. 

Si^Wi^CtKt=J>^^^^:^ N. Y. Carved Moulding Co. and others 

WESTERN BUILDERS' SUPPLY CO. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

155 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 
Phone Kearny 1991 





Oil Safety and Saving 

for Your Clients 

When planning a home, power plant, store or any 
building, remember that Bowser Storage Systems 
mean safety and saving in the storing and handling of 
gasolene and oils of all kinds. 

Safe 

Oil Storage 

Systems 

lthe"Gas"ingaso- 

Keeps the/>oiferin 

space in the garage— makes the 

:r Systems save oil, keep it clean, auto- 
illy 




In the Garage 

—dirt and danger o 
garage truly modem. 

In Factories ^°"e 



floor space, make men thrifty and effic 
oils. Keep premises tidy— cut down o 
utility all 'round. 

Bowser information for the architect i 



For the Factory 



ill be gladly sent upon 
request. No charge— no obligation. Write today. 

1 S. F. Bowser & Company, Inc. 

Engineers, Manofactnrers and Original Patentees 
I of Oil Handling Devices 

3Q173 Thomas St., Fort Wayne, Indiana 
J 612 Howard SU, San Francisco, CaL 

Telephone — Douglas 4323 



24 



The Architect and Eusiinccr 




ELKUS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO Lewis M. Gardner. Architect 

ENAMELED BRICK 

Used for Facing This Building 

"THE ACKNOWLEDGED STANDARD" 

An Attractive, Durable Exterior for Office and 
Commercial Structures 

Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co. United Materials Company 

Manufacturers Distributors 

402-414 Frost Bldg., LOS ANGELES Crossley Bldg., SAN FRANCISCO 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



25 




Residence as executed by David 
J. Myers, Architect, one of many, 
showing beautiful and artistic 
effects made practical through 

specifying \\"hitne\' \\'indo\vi. 



HE WHITNEV 
WINDOW I 



WM. H. PRINGLE, Mgr. 

TELEPHONE GARFIELD 7956 
522 Sharon Building, San Francisco. 




Steiger 

Terra Cotta i?^ Pottery 

Works 



Main Office: 729 Mills Building 

: DOUGLAS 3010 San Francisco, Cal. 



ENAMELED BRICK 

MAT AND TRANSPARENT GLAZE 



PACIFIC SEWER PIPE CO. 



825 EAST SEVENTH STREET 



LOS ANGELES 



1 


v-"^^ r 

Gladding.HcBean&Co. 

Manufacturers Clay Products 

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco 

Works. Lincoln.Cal 


1 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



26 



The Architect and Engineer 




What is More Troublesome than to Pack Radiator Valves? 

You never seem to have the right size packing. Because 
there is no active rod travel through the stuffing box the pack- 
ing sets and gets hard, and the vaives leak more or less when 
opened or closed. 

PALMETTO TWIST 

can be uni-tranded and any size valve packed from one spool. 

It cannot burn — it's all asbestos. Does not get hard — because 
a perfect lubricant is forced into each strand. 

Use PALMETIO TWIST on all ihe valves, and you will 
not have to repack so often. 

We will send you a sample spool FREE. Just to prove this. 

H. N. COOK BELTING CO.. 

317-319 Howard St.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



If you Need 

CRUDE OIL BURNING EQUIPMENT 

write us your requirements. We will specify and submit bids on 

High or Low Pressure Mechanical Burners 

Installed on 30 days Trial — Price Lowest 

WRITE 

AMERICAN HEAT & POWER COMPANY 

7th and Cedar Streets OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




AUSTIN Improved Cube 
Concrete Mixer 

Made in all sizes and styles of mountings for 
general concrete work, for road and pavement 
construction, and for bituminous concrete work. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING & 
CONTRACTING CO. 

Main Office, Railway Exchange. CHICAGO ILL. 

Direct Factory Branch in SAN FRANCISCO. 

Office: 

473-485 Sl.XTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC FIRE EXTINGUISHER CO. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Heating and Ventilating, Electrical In- 
stallations, Fire Extinguishing Apparatus 

THE GRINNELL AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 

Main Office: so? MONTGOMERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

r 217-2 18 Colman Building - - - . - . ^ . Seattle Wash. 

R,o.^i, nffi-^f J 504-50; McKay Building Portland. Ore. 

Branch Offices. J 5^* 5,^5^,^^^ Bmlding - Spokane. Wash. 

( 563 I. W.Hellman Building Los Angeles. Cal. 




When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Ennneer 



27 



TTI17 HOT TJl? A 1? r'TTI?0 t> A T> the only single piece type curb 

l£l£!y 1J\JIjI5£jJ\S\ l^UlV£) r>AK BAR MADE ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 




SECTIONAL VIEW OF DOLBEAR CURB BAR IN CONCRETE 
SOLID ANCHORAGE — NON-WEDGIXG — MECHANICALLY PERFECT 

THE AMERICAN STEEL BAR MFG. CO. 

MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BLDG. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

T. CROWE & CO. UNION LIME CO. 

Agents Agents Southern California 

Seventli & Alameda Sts., Los Angeles 

FRED H. FIGEL 



Seattle— 411 diobe Bldg 
Tacoma— lOOS - A Street 
Spokane — So. 164 Madiso 
Portland— 45 - 4th St. 



St. 



J.G.BRAUN 

615-621 S. Paulina St., Chicago, III. 

527=541 W. 35th Street, New York 



carries a complete stock of 



Steel Mouldings for Store Fronts 
Elevator Enclosures, Etc. 





by Js in. by >/ii 



Plain andOrnamental Sash Bars. Leaves. 
Rosettes, Pickets and Ornamental Riv- 
ets, S<^uare Root Angle Iron from H in. 

■■~y,^ras. Catalog to Architects. Archileclural 

Tubing for Elevators, Elevator •''■°" Works and Builders 

Enclosures and Office Railings only on AppluaUon 

Patent Sheet Metal Shears Punching Machines 

All parts, including the main body, are made of forged steel whicii makes these 
tools far superior to any made from cast steel. The Punch Machines are made 
from steel plates. All movable parts are steel forgings. All parts which can be 
are tempered. The Eccentric pillar blocks are made with independent steel rings. 
Some of these Machines also have Shears for cutting Angle. Tee or Flat Iron. 

WRITE fOR aiAlOG 
AND rRICfS 




OVER 900 
MACHINES 
SOLD 



28 



The Architect and Engineer 




A NATIVK SON' BEAR IN SHEET METAL BY 

San Francisco Metal Stamp- 
ing and Corrugating Company 

stamped and Spun 
Sheet Metal Ornaments 

statue Work, MissionTile, Art Metal Ceilings 



554-556 TREAT AVE., Near Nineteenth St. 



phones: 

MISSION 2421 
HOME M-3428 



Vulcan Iron Works 

(Established 1851) 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
AND CAST IRON 
ORNAMENTAL IRON 



ROCK BREAKERS 

BLAKE PATTERN — DODGE PATTERN 




Works j Francisco and Kearny Streets 
Office i ^^" Francisco, Cal. 



The Cutler Mail Chute 


■■ 


Pacific 




Coast 


■"■■Sa 


1 Represen- 




nffiBDDGIH 


tatives : 




lH^^^^gg 


San Francisco, 




^^^^^^^^1 


Cal., 




^^^^^^^^1 


Thomas Day 




^^^^^^^^1 


Company. 




H^^^H^I^l 


Portland, 




i^Slr--^TS^ffl| 


Ore. 




f:;--':[-^S^ 


C. W. Boost. 




11 


Seattle and 




Tacoma, 




^ I'll 


Wash., 

D. E. Fryer 


^ 


; &Co. 


qi:v-'""rT^^„,.;~-,.^-j 


1 Spokane, 


1^ Im| 


Wash. 


Mail Box— L. C. Smith Building " 

Seattle. Wash., TOUSLEY. 
Gagrgrin & Gaertrin. Architects. 
Syracuse. N. Y. 


Cutler Mail Chute Co., 


Cutler Building. 


ROCHESTER, N, Y. 




OENAMNTAL 

IR0N6BR0NZE 

STRVCTVEAL STEEL 

CINCINNATI 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WESTERN BVBLDEES SVPPIY CO 

155 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 
LOS ANGELES 

SWEETSEE (f BALDWIN SAFE CO 
200 EAST 93 ST 



riting: to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



29 




Isometric view 
of the Oscil- 
lating Portal 
Wall Bed 

showing how 
the same bed 
^:"!::1 may be used, 
at will, either 
on the sleeping 
porch or in the 



Sleeping Porch Bed Room 

MARSHALL & STEARNS CO., san ,>;«anc,^co^^_.^^^^^ ''^hTL.^.sy 



Geo. H. Dver President 



R. \V. Dver. Vicc-Pres. 



W.J. Dver. ?ec'y 



DYER BROTHERS 

Golden West Iron Works, Inc. 

Structural Iron and Steel Contractors 



ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 



Office and works: 
17th and KANSAS STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone Market 134 



Guaranteed Building Specialties 

SEE OUR LIST 



Enameled Brick (American Enameled Brick 

& TUe Co.) 
Safety Treads (American Mason Safety Tread 

Co. 

Hollow Metal Steel and Bronze Doors 

and Trim (Monarch Metal Mfg. Co.) 
Revolving Door (Atchison.) 
Medicine Cabinets (Corey Metal Mfg Co.) 

Metal Lockers (Hart & Cooley Co.) 

Warehouse Doors, Rolling Steel Shtit= 
ters. Garage and Elevator Doors 

(Variety Manufacturing Co.) 



Dumb Waiters (Energy Elevator Co.) 
Radiator Valves (Lavigne Manufacturing Co.) 

Elevating Window Fixtures (Tabor Sash 

Fixture Co.) 

Metal Weather Strip, Bronze and Zinc 

(Monarch Metal Weather Strip Co.) 

Waterproofing Compound and Steel 
Cement Hardener ("Insuiite," "Aqua- 
bar" and "Xational.") 

Venetian Blinds (Swedish Venetian Blind 
Co.) 



C. JORGENSEN & COMPANY ''' fA^'^l'^c^l^^'' 



Telephone Kearny 2386 



30 



The Architect and Engineer 



Exterior of this modern 
Hotel is Protected with 




BAY STATE 
BRICK rt//^ 
CEMENT 
COATING 

which waterproofs all concrete 
and cement surfaces without de- 
stroying the distinctive texture 
of the cement. It becomics'a part 
of the material over which it is 
applied and affords las'ing pro- 
tection to the structure ; prevent- 
ing discoloration of interior and 
exterior surfaces caused by mois- 
ture corroding the metal lathing. 
Send for booklet 25 which contains complete informati( 
CO.'VTINQ. 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND & CO., Inc. 

Paint and Varnish Makers and Lead Corroders 

82-84 WASHINGTON STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

AGENTS: F. T. Crowe & Co.. Portland. Ore.. Spokane. Seattle. Tacoma, Wash.. 

Vancouver. B. C; Jones-Moore Paint House. San Diego. Cal.; R. N. Nason & Co.. 54 

Pine Street. San Francisco; R. N. Nason & Co.. 1047 South Main Street. Los Angeles. 




HOTEL "^'ELLir^CTON. San Fn 
Frederick Boese. Architect 




Finished with Old Virg 



Cabot's Old Virginia White 

A Soft, Clean White for Shingles, Siding and all other Outside Woodwork 

A shingle-stain compound that has the brilliant whiteness of whitewash, with none of 
its objectionable features, and the durability of paint, with no " painty " effect. The 
cleanest, coolest and most effective treatment for certain kinds of houses. 

SAMUEL CABOT, Inc., Mfg. Chemists, Boston, Mass. 

Waterproof Cement Stains. Waterproof Brick Stains. 

Damp-proofing. Waterproofing. Protective Paint, etc. 

\ Pacific Building Materials Company, 523 Market St., San Francisco. 



AGENTS 1 The Mathews Paint Company, Los Angeles. 

' Waterhouse & Price Company, Los Angeles. (Qiiilt). 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Enzinccr 



31 



P. Noble. Pres. 



) BoNNEAU Noble. Vice-Pri 



Thomas Rolph. Sec'y 



f arifir SoUmg illtU (Ho. 



SUPPLIERS OF 



Structural Steel, Forgings, Bolts, Rivets, 
Frogs, Switches, Cast Iron Castings 



General Office and Works 
17th and MISSISSIPPI STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Market 215. also Connecting City Offices 



City Offices 

216-217 SHARON BUILDING 

Telephone Sutter 4388 




W. B. MORRIS, President H. M. WRIGHT. Vice-President L. J. GATES. Secretary 

Western Iron Works 

STRUCTURAL IRON and 
STEEL CONTRACTORS 



Gas Holders, Vault Linings, Jails, Fire Escapes, Beams, Channels, Angles 
and Steel Wheelbarrows Carried in Stock 



,CAL 



W. R. ERODE, Pri 



R. J. ERODE. Vice-Pres. 



LOUIS R. HOLM, Sec'ty 



ERODE IRON WORKS 

Established 1886 Incorporated 1913 

Fabricators and Contractors of Structural Steel 

and 

ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 

Telephone Kearny 2464 
31 to 37 HAWTHORNE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Between Howard and Folsom Sts., East of Third Street 

When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



32 The Architect and Efiginecr 



TELEPHONE. MISSION 1763 HOME PHONE. J 2376 

C. J. HILLARD CO., Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Bank and Office Railings. Elevator Enclosures and Cars. 

Cast Iron Stairs and Store Fronts. Wire Work. Fire Escapes. 

Nineteenth and Minnesota Sts. or- /^ i 

Nexl lo California Canneriei ^Sttt F ranClSCO, L.al. 



Telephone Mission 5230 



Ralston Iron Works, Inc. 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
Ornamental Iron Worli 

Twentieth and Indiana Sts. San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Main 322 

The Palm Iron and Bridge Works 

INCORPORATED 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
ORNAMENTAL IRONWORK 

15th and R Streets - SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



MERRIT IRONING BOARD 

THE attention of architects and owners is called to the 
exceptional merits of the Merrit Ironing Board, the 
latest improvement in folding ironing boards. This 
ironing board has given genuine satisfaction wherever 
it has been installed. It is very rigid, strong and simple. 
Send for Descriptive Circular and Price List to 

MERRIT IRONING BOARD COMPANY 

1715 21 MISSION STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO 



When writing to Advertisers please mention tliis magazii 



The Architect and Engtneer 



ZZ 




SPECIFY THE COLONIAL 
HEAD THROAT and DAMPER 

THE BEST DEVICE FOR OPEN FIREPLACES 
SEE SWEETS INDEX PAGES— 1702-3 

SOLD ON THE PACIFIC COAST BY 

AuroraMfgCo. Higgins Bldg., Los Angeles POIONIAI 

D.O. Church San Francisco rrDCDI A^nc 

Scoit. Lvman & Stack Sacramento FIREPLACE 

D. E. Frver & Co, Seattle COMPANY 

Wm. N. O'Neil & Co Vancouver. B. C. _.„_.^„ 

M.J. Walsh Co. Portland, Ore. :; CHICAGO:: 



CRANE 

COMPANY 


Higk Grade . . . 

PLUMBING 
SUPPLIES 

Steam and Hot ^Vater Heating 

PIPE, VALVES, FITTINGS 


Second & Brannan Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO 


Power Plant and Water Works Materials 

STEAM SPECIALTIES 



CALIFORNIA STEAM AND PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 

PIPE, VALVES AND FITTINGS omce and warehouse: 

FOR 671-679 FIFTH STREET 

STEAM, GAS, WATER AND OIL 



COJVIPUETE STOCK OF' 

The Kelly & Jones Company Products 

WRITE F'OR CATALOGUE 



Corner Bluxooie 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Telepbone Sutler 737 









Motts 

Plumbing 

Fixtures 




THE J. L. MOTT 
IRON WORKS 

1828— Eighty Seven Years of Supremacy— 1915 

SHOWROOMS 135 Kearny Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Douglas 1786 D. H. Gulick, Sales Agt. 









When writing to Advertisers pic 



ention this magazine. 



34 



The Architect and Engineer 



Ever Have Trouble With Your 
Furnace or Retort? 

The fault is not always with 
the IVorl^manship, sometimes it's 
the material. 

Specify *'Livermore" when 
you use Fire Brick or Fire 
Clay Products of any I^ind and 
})ou can depend upon the quality 
being there. Special shapes and 
sizes made to order. Standard 
sizes carried in stocl^. 

LIVERMORE FIRE BRICK CO. 



LIVERMORE, 



CALIFORNIA 




STEEL TANKS COATED 



BITURINE 

CANNOT RUST (inside and out) 

White House — O'Connor & Moffatt — Eastman Kodak 

Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson — Commercial — Flood Bldgs. 

TANKS ALL COATED. 

24 California St., San Francisco Kearny 4478 



THE KINNEAR MFG. CO. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

STEEL ROLLING FIREPROOF 

DOORS AND SHUTTERS 

Agents 
Seattle - Portland = Los Angeles - Salt Lake City 




San Francisco Office 



517 Rialto Building 



"FIRE — A CRIME" 

We art' equipped with two Pacific Coast Factories to manufacture 
METAL DOORS— Tin Kalamein, Composite. Hollow Steel and Bronze,— Swinging, 

Sliding, Folding, Elevator, Van Kannel Revolving Doors, and Wilson's Steel 

Rolling Doors. 
MKTAI, \\'INl)OWS — Underwriters, Hollow Metal of all kinds Kalamein, Bronze 

and Steel Sasb gjg- See the SIMPLEX METAL WINDOW. 

UNITED STATES METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

OP THE PACIFIC COAST 
52,i Market St., San Francisco 750 Keller St., Los Angeles 

AgL-i.ts .iiid Branches in all Coast Cities. 



The Architect and Engineer 

of California sin«in copies. 

2o Ci-nts 

Pacific Coast States 



Contents for February page 

A LOOK-OUT TOWER IN SWITZERLAND Frontispiece 

Watercolor by Franz Harding 
SOME HOUSES IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA DESIGNED BY B. 

COOPER CORBETT, A. I. A. :« 

Ross Wilton Edminson 
DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOVING PICTURE THEATRE - - 51 

THE ARCHITECT IN COST PLUS CONTRACTS - - 61 

William L. Bowman, C. E. 
THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR INCOMPETENCE ... - m 

THE AESTHETIC IN CONCRETE i'~ 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN LANDSCAPE GARDENING AT 

THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA T7 

Professor Jno. W. Gregg 

A UNIFORM BUILDING CODE 81) 

F. W. Fitzpatrick 

THE BUILDING OF IT S3 

Henry A. Hoyt 

LESSONS FROM THE EDISON FIRE 84 

CITY PLANNING AND HOUSING 87 

Charles Henry Cheney 
INTERESTING EXPERIMENTS WITH GLUE MOULDS IN RE- 
PRODUCING PREHISTORIC MONUMENTS '.i:: 
Neil M. Judd 
THE ARCHITECT'S WIFE: A STUDY OF DIFFICULTIES '.ir 
BERTHOLD MONUMENT AND POOL AT MONTEREY, CALI- 
FORNIA 10- 

EDITORIAL ----- 104 

WITH THE ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS loij 

REVIEW OF RECENT BOOKS Ill 

HEATING AND LIGHTING 113 

STATE, COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING - - 118 



36 



The Architect and Enaincer 



A Great Truth Driven Home to A Great Man! 

The day after his factories were swept by fire THOMAS A. EUISON said: 

"The big lesson of this fire has been the value of eoncrete construction. My build- 
ings are gutted, but there they stand ready for rcfiiting. 

"One error revealed was in not using STEEL WINDOW SASHES 

AND TRIM, and wired glass that withstands great heat. WE WILL 

CERTAINLY HAVE TO USE THAT FINISH HENCEFORTH." 

It is obvious to all 
who argue against 
the additional ini- 
tial cost of hollow 
steel trim that Mr. 
Edison's enormous 
plant and thousands 
of men and their 
t midies are now at 
I standstill for no 
other reason than 
that his buildings 
were not equipped 
with this material. 
Would not Mr. Edi- 
son and the com- 
munity at large be 
the gainers if the lit- 
tle additional mon- 
ey had been spent 
in the beginning? 

What is true of 
Mr. Edison's plant 
in this instance may 
also be true of any 
plant, be it com- 
mercial, office or public building, and in such cases the loss occasioned by every day 
of idleness must be balanced against the small additional cost necessary to prevent 
such a loss. 

No building is complete without doors, windows and trim, and no building, no mat- 
ter how fireproof otherwise, ever was or ever can be absolutely fireproof unless its 
DOORS, WINDOWS and TRIM consist of fireproof material! 

DAHLSTROM HOLLOW METAL DOORS, WINDOWS and TRIM are fire= 
proof in reality, and their use in Mr. Edison's buildings would have effectually pre- 
vented the fire from spreading from floor to floor, and from building to building. THE 
DAHLSTROM PRODUCTS make an otherwise fire-protected building absolutely 
fireproof and fire-safe. 

In planning and constructing your buildings profit by Mr. Edison's experience — 
Don't gamble with fate and run the risk of having the truth driven home to you in a 
like manner. Our experts can assist you, and will do so gladly upon request. 

DAHLSTROM METALLIC DOOR COMPANY 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES AND PLANT 

34 Blackstone Avenue, Jamestown, N.Y. 

Branches and Representatives in All Principal Cities 

M. G. WEST COMPANY 

353 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO 






Frontispiece 

The Architect and Engine 

of California 

for February, 1915 



A LOOK-OUT TOUER 7.V SWITZERLAS'D 
WATER COLOR BY FRANZ HARDING 
With R. A. Herald, Architect, Sacramento 



THE 



Architect and Engineer 



Of California 

Pacific Coast States 



Vol. XL. 



FEBRUARY, 1915 



No. 2. 




HOUSE OF MR. C. WESLEy ROBERTS, LOS AXCELES 
B. Cooper Corbet!, Architect 



Some Houses in Southern California Designed by 
B. Cooper Corbett, A. I. A. 

By ROSS WILTOX EDMIXSOX 

MR. B. COOPER CORBETT of Los Angeles, a student of the French 
and ItaHan schools, has established a precedent in Southern California 
pertaining to a style that heretofore had not been introduced in the 
\^'estern States. This is noticeable even in his earlier designs, produced 
soon after he left Messrs. McKim, Mead & \\'hite, when that firm had 
more than a hundred draftsmen in its employ. We see the exquisite 
influences of his hand while a designer in the offices of various Southern 
California architects and the same feeling may be traced to his present-day 
practice. 

One of Mr. Corbett's earliest and best designs in domestic architecture 
i« the residence of Mr. C. Wesley Roberts in Berkeley Square, Los Angeles. 
This house was erected in 1910, the substructure being of reinforced con- 
crete, including the floors and supporting beams. These beams serve a 
twofold purpose ; first, as an architectural embellishment : and second, to 
carry the floor loads. 



40 



The Architect and niii;iiieer 




PERGOLA. HOUSE OF MR. I 
B. Coofc 



. IIESLEV ROBERTS, LOS ANGELES 
Corbctt. Architect 



The plan of the first floor is not unusual, but on the other hand very 
simple, yet in its simplicity lies the charm of best ideas, that of symmetry. 
One enters the house through a well-lighted vestibule with living-room on 
the left, dining-room on the right, and access to second floor by wide stairs. 
Passing under these stairs directly to the rear we see a semi-enclosed 
patio paved in cement and surrounded by concrete columns. The living- 
room is finished in San Domingo mahogany with built-in bookcases and 
furniture to match. The stair hall has the same finish. Here the rich red 
paneling of the mahogany is carried to the ceiling in two-foot width. The 
dining-room to the right is paneled in quarter-sawed oak from floor to 
ceiling, bringing to mind the Flemish idea with furniture made-to-order 
through the wishes of the architect. 

The second floor has a central hall over the one below with bedroom 
suites on both sides, each suite consisting of a bedroom, bath, dressing- 
room and spacious closets. There are four of these, and one is used as a 
guest's chamber for an occasional visitor. The wood throughout this 
floor is finished in white enamel, and the wall surfaces of hard plaster toned 
down to soft, pleasing colors. 

The house, including a garage in the rear, was built by dav labor at a total 
cost of $20,000. 

Another house from the drawing board of Mr. Corbett is that of the 
Charles Sharp residence in the Wiltshire boulevard district, Los Angeles. 
Formerly it was the residence of Mr. Kornblum, but since the transfer 



The Architect and Engineer 



41 




ENTRANCE, HOUSE OF MR. CHARLES AMILLO 
B. COOPER CORBETT ARCHITECT 



42 



The Architect and Eno^inecr 




HOUSE OF MR. CHARLES AMILLO. LOS ANGELES 
B. Cooper Corbctt, Architect 




HOUSE OF MRS. LOUISE DENKER, LOS ANGELES 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 



'~hc Architect and Engineer 



43 




TOWER. HOUSE OF MR. CH.4RLES .SH.-IRP. LOS .-iXCELBS 
B. COOPER CORBETT, ARCHITECT 



44 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 




HOUSE OF MR. CHARLES SHARP. LOS ANGELES 
B. Coofer Corbeit, Architect 




CONSERVATORY, HOUSE OF MR. CHARLES SHARP, LOS ANGELES 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 



The Architect and Engineer 



45 




GARDE'N AND PERGOLA. HOUSE OF MR. CHAS. SHARP, LOS A\'GELES 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 



the new owner had the left-hand gable and conservatory added. The house 
has been pronciunced one of the best examples of half-timber work in the 
Southland. 

It may be of interest to note that when Air. Sharp came to Los Angeles 
a few years ago to look for a home he passed this house at noon, and by 
nightfall he was the owner of it, enjoying his first meal there a few hours 
after he saw the place. The transaction amounted to $130,000, inclusive of 
its furnishings. 

The living-room occupies the east end, the house faces south, with a 
music-room in the rear, and has mahogany trim. A massive fireplace of 
Utah white sandstone reaching to the ceiling is one of several striking 
features of this house. The room is furnished in dark red-brown colors 
with a single Oriental rug of generous proportion covering the floor. The 
dining-room is completely paneled in San Domingo mahogany, carrying 
out the Jacobian period. A built-in sideboard faces the dining-room door, 
which is similar to the one in the Denker house, save for a leaded glass 
window over the mirror. Opening from this room are French doors 
flanking the sideboard, which give entrance to the conservatory — a room 
that covers the entire width of the house. The finish is redwood, stained 
a gray-green color and then rubbed. The floor is of red tile. 

The Perry house in Hollywood is one of Mr. Corbett's latest works. 
It is suggestive of the Italian villa type and its setting is enhanced by the 
wonderful mountain formation which surrounds it. Hollywood enjoys a 
sunny climate, and its many knolls have beautiful homes which command 



46 



The Architect and Engineer 




HOUSE OF MR. C. F. PERRY, HOLLYWOOD. C.ILIFORXL^ 
B. Cooper Corbet t. Arehdeet 




LIVING ROOM AND HALL, HOUSE OF MR. C. F. PERRY. HOLLYIVOOD, CALIF0RNL4 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 



The Architect and Engineer 



47 





TH 









?t'.VC.-)LO)r OF .UK. /OH.V H-'. EDMINSOX. PASADENA. CALIFORNIA 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 




BRICK STEPS AND PORCH. EDMINSON BUNGALOir 
B. Cooper Corbett. Architect 



48 



The Architect and Engineer 




DINING ROOM, EDMINSON BUNGALOIV 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 




LIVING ROOM. EDMINSON BUNGALOW 
B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 



The Architect and Engineer 49 

a wonderful view of sea and mountain. It is the growing suburb of Los 
Angeles, and soon will become as renowned as Pasadena. 

The exterior of Mr. Perry's house is brick with plaster finish, the best 
type of construction, and the only that will stand against time. The Doric 
columns of the entrance porch are concrete and plastered to match the 
wall surfaces. The ornaments over the arched windows are staff and 
painted white to match the plaster finish. The red tiles of the roof are a 
local product, and were made in Los Angeles. 

With the exception of the dining-room, which is mahogany, the entire 
lower floor is finished in French gray enamel similar in tone to the John W. 
Edminson residence of Pasadena. This harmonizes well with the furnish- 
ings, and gives a brighter aspect to the inside on dark days. 

The construction of the residence of Mrs. Louise Denker is the same 
as the Perry house in Hollywood. The pleasing proportion of the facade 
is classic, French doors and windows bringing to mind some palace of the 
Old World. The bay tree boxes of the front steps are especially note- 
worthy in design, and add greatly to the finishing features of the house. 

The hall, living-room and dining-room are in mahogany finish with 
furniture to match the woodwork, and that of the dining-room is very well 
carried out, of which the built-in sideboard is the attraction. In this house 
the architect either selected or desig'ned the furniture himself in order to 
have unity with his work. Even the hardware was carefully thought out, 
and it was found that the Guerin period came the nearest to harmonizing 
with the interior. The electroliers and decoration are also from the designs 
submitted by the architect. 

A house of smaller proportions and design is that of Mr. Charles Amillo. 
It is simple, plain, and attractive to those who admire the "Small Rivera 
Style." The exterior is plaster on metal lath ; not so sturdy as plaster 
on brick, but here the architect was compelled to keep within an $8,000 
limit. 

The plan is very simple as may be construed from the straight-forward 
lines of the exterior. A pergola adds beauty to the house, and other details, 
such as the hood over the doorway and the paved terrace in front, give a 
welcomed note to the site on a double corner. 

Although Mr. Corbett has traveled considerably he is ever on the alert 
for new ideas and his training in the Beaux Arts Society is continually 
showing itself in his now growing practice. It is one thing to have an 
architectural education, but that is not enough, the architect must increase 
his knowledge by constant study and travel if he would be a success. 



Out of Doors Mural Painting 

For the first time in the history of world's expositions, great mural 
paintings have been used out of doors. These are the work of some of the most 
famous artists, including the celebrated "ten American painters." The murals 
have been made upon canvas with a view of their permanent preservation. 
Two huge canvases, each 46x16 feet, by Frank Du Mond and Edward Sim- 
mons are placed in the triumphal arches in the Court of the Universe. Du 
Mond's canvases depict the movement of immigration from New England 
westward to California and the labors of the empire builders in the Golden 
land. Simmons' paintings are more purely allegorical, with many female 
figures done in soft, bright tones, with novel and masterly technique. 



50 



The Architect and Engmeer 




TirOLI THEATER, SAN FRANCISCO, DESIGNED FOR GRAND 
OPERA. BUT USED FOR HIGH CLASS •■MOVIE" ATTRACTIONS 
O'BRIEN & WERNER. ARCHITECTS 



The Architect and Engineer 



51 




ALAMEDA MOri.XG PICTURE THEATRE 
A. ir. Cornelius. Architect 



Development of the Moving-Picture Theatre 

WITH the growing popularity of the moving-picture show has come a 
demand for better theatres for this class of amusement, and it is no 
exaggeration to say that the future will likely see as much money spent 
in the design and construction of "movie" theatres as has heretofore been 
expended for the pretentious opera and vaudeville houses, which means that 
the "movie" is a money-making proposition and is unquestionably here to stay. 
That it has made disastrous inroads upon the legitimate theatrical business is 
evidenced by the fact that many of the best playhouses are being converted into 
moving-picture theatres. The Tivoli Theatre in San Francisco is an example. 
This structure was built five years ago at an outlay of nearly one-half million 
dollars. Built for grand opera with seats bringing from one to five dollars 
each, we find it today the home of the movie — admission 15 and 25 cents. 

The original moving-picture theatres of about ten years ago, as we all 
remember them, were opened in small stores altered for the purpose. These 
were, in most cases, non-fireproof, without means of ventilation other than the 
entrance doors, and in isolated cases, the owners, as a concession to the needs 
of humanity, provided one or two small ventilators in the roof, when the 
building was one story in height. 

The means of egress were absolutely inadequate as was proven by the num- 
ber of catastrophes which have occurred at various times, causing loss of life 
and injury all out of proportion to the number of occupants. At that time the 
picture machines themselves were primitive affairs and there was constant 
danger from fire. 

The repetition of panics due to fires and poor construction of the booths 
enclosing the picture machines and defective mechanical devices in the machines 
themselves, caused the enactment of various municipal regulations in the differ- 
ent large cities of the country governing the construction and operation of 
these places of amusement. One of the first results of these laws was the rapid 
increase in the cost of buildings for exhibiting pictures due to the special require- 
ments of the various building codes. It then became necessary for an owner 



52 The Architect and Engineer 

of a picture-house to have increased seating capacity to be able to obtain a 
suitable income from> the investment. 

Starting at the beginning, writes Mr. P.*R. Pereira in the American Archi- 
tect, one of the first things to consider in designing one of the larger types 
of moving-picture theatres, is whether or not a stage shall be provided and 
if so, of what depth and how equipped. It has generally been conceded by 
theatre owners that where an auditorium of large capacity is required, it is 
the better part of prudence to provide a stage, even if not more than twenty-five 
feet from curtain line to back wall and of greater depth, if not too great a sacri- 
fice of seats is required. This is a portion of the problem, however, which is 
usually decided by the owner, who. if he is a man of experience in the operation 
of theatres, will have already developed decided views on this point. 

After having settled upon the noain lines of the building, and general 
arrangement of the walls, we have to consider the basement. It is not usual 
to provide a trap pit under the stage as is the case of a theatre for dramatic 
or spectacular productions, the only excavation in that portion being that 
required for musicians" room, toilet facilities, or such spaces as may be needed 
for mechanical appliances in connection with both the heating and ventilation 
systems. 

From the musicians' room, access is given to the orchestra pit by means of 
a doorway provided between the wall separating the stage house from the 
auditorium and a fire cut-off, formed by means of Underwriter's automatic 
tin-clad doors. 

Very often the owners have an organ installed in addition to the orchestra. 
It has been found by experience the best place for the organ machinery and 
pipes is under the stage near the orchestra pit, with spaces provided over the 
proscenium boxes for the echo organ. 

Unless existing conditions are most favorable from the standpoint of cost, 
the greater portion of the orchestra floor is laid directly on the soil, which is 
graded to the proper contours. 

Very often it is found convenient to locate the men's smoking room and 
men and women's toilets in the basement at the rear of the orchestra, with 
stairways leading directlj' from the auditorium. The cloak rooms may also 
be placed here. 

The remainder of the excavated portion of the basement is taken up with 
the boiler rooms, coal storage space, transformer room, pump rooms, fan 
rooms and other spaces for mechanical appliances, which should be kept 
adjacent to each other for economy and convenience of operation. 

In planning the ground or orchestra floor, one is governed very much 
by the same limitations of construction and conditions as an ordinary 
playhouse, excepting only that one must remember that in this type of 
building the crowds are constantly coming and going, thus requiring 
unusually good means of ingress and egress. 

A commodious lobby should be arranged for, since it has been the 
experience of the owners of this type of theatre in the past that a large 
space is required to accommodate the crowds waiting for entrance, special 
attention being given to separating the incoming and outgoing people. 

A box office should be located in the lobby, but not extended into it so 
as to form an obstruction. Here should be placed the switch controlling 
the lobby and sign lights. It should also have telephonic communication 
with the stage, the orchestra and manager's office. 

In houses of great capacity, more than one bo.x office should be provided. 
It is often found particularly advantageous to have a small portable ticket 
booth located in the center or side of the main entrance at the sidewalk. 



1 



1;;! i 


\ 






fli 




-- 




j;_ 


ess 





THEATRE DE LUXE, SAX JOSE 11 illiam Binder, Architect 



54 



The Architect and Em^ineer 




FLOOR PLAN, FRANKLIN THEATRE 
OAKLAND , CALIFORNIA 

C. H. MILLER, ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Eno^iitecr 



55 




FRAXKL!\ THEATRE, OAKLAND. lAI 
C. H. Miller. Archllecl 




INTERIOR FRANKLIN THEATRE, OAKLAND 
C. H. MilUr, Archttect 



56 The Architect and Engineer 

This latter, however, is not an improvement from an esthetic standpoint. 

The decoration and design of the lobby, of course, depends largely on 
the architect's taste, the class of patronage expected and the limits of 
the client's purse. 

In this connection, it is well to keep in mind the durability of the mate- 
rials to be employed. We must remember, in the first place, that a large 
theatre, seating several thousand people, will have possibly from five to 
ten thousand people passing through the lobby, coming and going each 
day and evening; this causes great wear and tear on the flooring, so that 
the materials used should be selected for hardness as well as beauty- 
Very often it is desirable to slope the floor of the lobby for the purpose 
of eliminating steps which should be avoided even where not prohibited 
by law. In such cases, materials of a non-slippery nature should be 
employed. 

In modern picture houses and, in fact, in most of the more recent play- 
houses, it has been found best to omit the gallery or second balcony entirely. 
The advantage of this is not only from a standpoint of economy, which is 
effected by the fact that the auditorium may be reduced in height, but a 
finer architectural efi^ect may be obtained. Also in modern picture houses, 
even where vaudeville is presented in connection with the pictures, the 
prices are in most cases moderate, and it is found that a certain class 
of patrons will be kept away in the event of their having to climb to 
an upper balcony or giallery. In this connection it is well to provide the 
entrance to the balcony through the main entrance, as is usual in the regular 
theatre, access to same being greatly improved by providing a mezzanine 
directly over the rear of the orchestra from which tunnels or vomitories 
are extended, bringing the patrons out of the lower portions of the balcony 
and at those points placing ushers to direct the patrons to their seats. At 
the openings, a crossover aisle is nearly always provided ; that is, a stepping 
wider than the other steppings of the balcony on which the seats are 
located. Seats are sometimes provided at the back of this crossover. In 
houses of great depth, more than one crossover is found necessar}' and the 
main balcony stairs are extended up to a second mezzanine with additional 
outlets further up the balcony. This arrangement of crossover aisles and 
tunnels eliminates the necessity of climbing to the rear or highest point of 
the balcony and then walking down the aisles to reach the lower or front 
portion, which is, of course, inconvenient for the patrons of the continuous 
performance house, as it creates unnecessary disturbance. 

In a theatre of this nature, it is necessary to provide continuous subdued 
lighting so placed as not to interfere with the brilliancy of the moving pic- 
ture ; for this purpose cove lighting, /. c.. lights arranged in coves formed 
in the ornamental plaster and provided with reflectors, is very effective. A 
less expensive method, however, is that provided by means of indirect 
lighting fixtures, thus eliminating the necessity for the expense entailed 
by providing coves and the expensive furring required. Sufficient addi- 
tional lighting should be provided so that the house may be brilliantly 
illuminated when desired, such as at intermissions. Sign lighting and arc 
light outlets should be located at the entrance as well as connections to the 
circuits, illuminating the marquise over the entrance or entrances. The 
outer vestibule and lobby is usually lighted in such a manner as to provide 
great brilliancy. 

One of the parts in the problem of designing this type of building is 
determining upon the location of the booth containing the machines pro- 
jecting the pictures. In a steep balcony, if the booth is located at the rear. 



The Architect and Engineer 



57 



t>i^ 



.0 




Golden Gate Cement used. 



\Elf T. & D. THEATRE, BERKELEY 
A. H\ COR.VELIUS. ARCHITECT 



58 



The Architect and Engineer 




a; O 









i^air??Tr 



The Architect a-id Engineer 



59 




60 The Architect and Engineer 

the angle of light on the screen tends to distort the pictures. This is some- 
times overcome by tilting the picture screen forward at the lower edge, thus 
correcting the distortion to a certain extent. A much better location for 
the booth is below the balcony at the rear of the orchestra. Such a position, 
however, usually results in the sacrifice of some of the most desirable seats, 
and also has a further disadvantage in that, in the .event of a fire or smoke 
in the booth, it is readily seen by the audience in the orchestra, and might 
possibly create a panic, whereas if the booth is placed in the rear of the 
balcony, a small fire or smoke caused by a short circuit or other causes, 
will not be noticed. The internal arrangement of the booth should be such 
as to provide a rewinding room with automatic self-closing doors, suitable 
ventilation by means of ducts to the outer air and ventilating registers in 
the face of the booth, so placed that light from the interior will not be 
thrown into the auditorium. The usual openings for one or more machines 
should be provided. In addition, peepholes for the operators and fireproof 
sliding shutters with fusible links. 

The heating and ventilating problem of this type of building is similar 
to that encountered in most auditoriums. It is usual to provide a system 
of ventilation by means of fans in the basement blowing the fresh air 
through tempering coils and filters to ducts below the orchestra floor, and 
from there up through ventilating chases to the orchestra and balcony. 



Lien Law Bond Invalid 

An amendment to the mechanic's lien law adopted in 1911 making it 
obligatory for a contractor to give to a property owner a bond for the pro- 
tection of all material dealers and laborers is unconstitutional, according to 
a decision recently handed down by Judge Troutt of San Francisco. The 
court held that the law violates the Federal Constitution by unfair discrim- 
ination, as none besides builders and contractors is compelled to give bonds 
to guarantee payment for material and labor. Furthermore, it in efifect im- 
poses a burden upon the owner because if he does not compel the contractor 
to put up a bond he himself is responsible for the contractor's debts. The 
decision was given in sustaining the demurrer of the National Suretv Com- 
pany to a complaint filed by Charles M. Woods and Frederick D. Huddart 
against Neil A. McLean and the Stewart Estate Company. 



Single Sugar Pine Yields Enough Lumber to Build 
Suburban House 

The United States government has received .$99.40 in settlement for a 
single sugar pine tree which was cut in trespass in the Stanislaus National 
Forest in California, and which yielded more than enough actual lumber to 
build a good-sized suburban frame house. The tree scaled 18,933 board feet 
and was valued at $5.25 per thousand feet. Not many trees contain enough 
lumber to build a two-foot board walk nearly two miles long, and this is 
believed to be the first case on record in which a single tree felled in a Na- 
tional Forest was valued at almost $100 on the stump, although National 
Forest timber is frequently sold at considerably higher rates. 



The Architect and Engineer 61 

The Architect in Cost Plus Contracts 

By WILLIAM L. BOWMAN, C. E., in the Brickbuikler 

THE most common and familiar form of cost plus contracts is termed 
the percentage contract where the contractor is paid a certain defined 
cost of the construction work witli a specified percentage thereon as 
compensation for his overhead expenses, personal services, and profit. 
Another form of these contracts is the cost plus a fixed sum contract where 
a specified fixed sum is added to the defined cost to cover the items just 
mentioned. As this sum is usually calculated upon a certain percentage 
of the estimated cost, it ordinarily amounts to the same sum as the per- 
centage. This is especially true since such contracts usually provide that if 
the magnitude of the undertaking is increased, the fixed sum to be paid the 
contractor shall be increased in the same proportion that the fixed sum to 
be paid bears to the cost of the original undertaking. There is still another 
form of contract which properly comes under this appellation, namely, 
where the owner agrees to pay for all labor and materials and give a build- 
ing superintendent a fixed weekly or monthly compensation for ordering 
materials, hiring men. and generally taking complete charge of the con- 
struction work. Is the legalposition of the architect any different in such 
cases than in the ordinary lump sum contract? Are his duties and responsi- 
bilities any different? 

Generally speaking, both of these questions can be answered in the 
negative. However, since the architect must act as the owner's adviser in 
the matter as to what form of contract is most advantageous and econom- 
ical under all circumstances, there are several points regarding these cost 
plus contracts and the relations, rights, and liabilities created by them that 
are worthy of some attention. In his role as the protector of the owner's 
pocketbook, a knowledge of the good and bad features of such contracts is 
essential. 

The ethics of the architectural profession call for the payment of 
services in certain percentages of a defined cost. Thus the architect works 
under a form of a percentage contract. Why does he as a rule discourage 
this familiar form of contract for the contractor? The predominant reason 
as given by the contractors is that since they favor it, the architects must 
necessarily disapprove. Today the two real reasons for the architect's posi- 
tion on this subject are : first, the distrust of the contractors due to their 
reputation in the past; and, secondly, the fact that the architect has much 
more detail work in his superintendence under the cost plus contracts than 
in the usual uniform contract. He must keep more assistants on the work 
to properly check the costs of materials, labor, etc. This also requires more 
time of the architect himself, since he must keep closely in touch with his 
assistants and with the work so that he may know that they are not being 
misled or deceived. Are there not advantages to the owner which should 
ordinarily make him glad to pay for the architect's extra help and some- 
what more, if required, for the extra personal service? 

Under the lump sum contract, when the contractor finds that he has a 
losing job, he naturally does everything to save himself. He is especially 
keen on trving to get the architect or the owner in a position where he can 
stop the work "and claim a breach of the contract. If his losses are going to be 
large, the work is stopped and he takes his chance in a lawsuit with the 
owner. There are always constant quarrels between the architect and con- 
tractor as to what the specifications mean or specify and as to whether 
certain work is, or is not, proper under the contract. The owner is neces- 



62 The Architect and lliv^incer 

sarily drawn into the differences and the iinhappiness caused can hardly 
be measured in financial terms. It would seem that the use of the per- 
centage contract with a maximum limit of liability' for the owner would 
assure the latter more nearly what he wants and what he is paying for, 
provided the architect gives the work the proper supervision for that kind 
of a contract. It should eliminate the trials and tribulations above enu- 
merated for both the architect and owner, and in addition save the owner 
from the burdensome and costly completion after defaults with the in- 
evitable lawsuits and their attendant expense and delay. It should cause 
the architect and contractor to vie with each other to see that the owner 
gets exactly what he wants instead of making them the enemies they are 
ordinarily. It should be noted that this form of contract increases the com- 
petition between the large corporations with heavy overhead expenses and 
the little contractor whose office is in his house, since the percentage paid 
has to cover these items in both cases. Until some more accurate deter- 
mination of contract work becomes fashionable, such as the widely sug- 
gested quantity-surveying plan, there is no question but that under ordinary 
circumstances a properly drawn cost plus contract is the most advantageous 
for all concerned. The owner's special plea for economy and cheapness 
must be governed b}^ the definition of "cost," by the percentage or fixed 
sum paid, and by a maximum liability under all contingencies. 

Cost of Work. As the architect has found in his own contracts for 
services, there is one point that cannot be too carefully stated and under- 
stood, namely, what elements are to be considered in the "cost" upon which 
the percentage is based. A case just decided covering this question involved the 
following facts : An architect had the usual contract for a fixed percentage 
based, however, on the "cost of the contracts." A contract was given for the 
entire work at $7,500. When the work was within three weeks of com- 
pletion the owner was unable to make a payment then due the contractor. 
This failure of the owner, due to some difference with the loan company, 
gave the contractor the chance he was looking for, and he immediately de- 
clared that the owner had broken the contract and therefore he was 
stopping the work and would claim the value of the work done to the time 
of stopping. The fact was, that the contractor had known for some time 
that he could not complete the work for his contract price, and that if he 
had to continue it would cost him from $1,000 to $1,500 more than he was 
to receive. As the owner was in a hurr}', he finally promised to pay for the 
unpaid materials and labor, and pay for the necessary material and labor to 
complete, and also a weekly salary to the contractor to act as superin- 
tendent for the completion, limiting it to three weeks. After the house was 
completed, believing he had a grievance against the architect, the owner 
refused to pay him a balance due, which resulted in the filing of a lien and 
an action to foreclose the same. At the trial the owner admitted that he 
understood that the architect was to get his percentage on the cost of the 
house. It was proved that the cost, with the troubles above mentioned, 
was $9,000, and the court held that the architect could charge his per- 
centage on his actual cost, and that he was not restricted to what it should 
have cost, or $7,500, had the contractor done as he agreed to do. This, case 
is also important in that it shows that "cost" means what it says, irre- 
spective of the causes for its amount. 

Just lately, in a very important building case, the question as to what 
was a reasonable percentage was raised. The experts who were called upon 
to give opinions upon that matter seemed to agree fairly well that 10 per 
cent was fair and 15 per cent a maximum, without taking into considera- 



77/1' Arcliitcct and Engineer 63 

tion that the percentage must depend upon the basis or definition of 
"cost." Let us see if they were correct in their general opinion. 

Ordinarily "cost" to the average person means only money spent at or 
near the construction work for foremen, mechanics, laborers, etc., and for 
materials actually incorporated in the construction or wasted in its con- 
struction. Such a person usually fails to remember that this does not in- 
clude such actual costs to the contractor as official, engineering and clerical 
salaries in large firms or corporations, rent, etc., of spacious general offices, 
interest on money invested in office, plant, equipment, depreciation, etc. 
It has been found that these items for a big corporation doing large work 
s-ary from 5 per cent to 20 per cent of the "cost" of labor and material on 
the job. For this reason the ordinary 10 per cent upon such "cost" often 
represents little or no profit for the contractor, although the owner usually 
considers it all profit. What percentage might be fair under certain cir- 
cumstances is well illustrated by a rather late case in the West. 

The laws of a certain western state provide that the state shall pay for 
excavation of waterways and filling in of tide lands at cost plus 15 per cent. 
A state contractor for this work sublet his filling work to a subcontractor 
at 15 cents per cubic yard. The contractor's supervision, engineering, etc., 
cost him 1 cent per cubic yard, so that this basis of 16 cents was certified 
as the cost to which the 15 per cent was added. When the assessments 
were attempted to be collected, they were resisted and in the resulting law- 
suit it was proven that the actual cost to the subcontractor to do the work 
was but 12 cents, giving them a 3-cent profit. The first court held that the 
cost heretofore certified should be reduced by this 3-cent profit ; but the 
Supreme Court held that the cost was 16 cents to the contractor, and there 
being no proof of any fraud, he was entitled to use that as the basis for the 
calculation of his percentage of profit. Thus instead of paying what was 
supposed to be 15 per cent of cost, the failure to stipulate that there should 
be no subcontracting unless the subcontractor's cost should be considered 
the contractor's cost, caused the state to pay 38 per cent upon the "actual 
cost," or 53 per cent upon the "cost" as that termi is ordinarily considered. 
Yet, as was fell said in that case, there was no showing but what this was 
a fair charge for the state to pa}' for the work. 

This failure to prevent subcontracting is even more strongly shown in a 
New York case where a contractor on a cost plus 10 per cent contract was 
held to be entitled to charge his 10 per cent on various subcontracts which 
he had given to the subcontractors at their cost plus 10 per cent. In other 
words, he actually collected 21 per cent on the "cost" to the subcontractor. 
In still another case an interesting conclusion was reached. A railroad 
grading contract provided that the contractor was to receive payment of 
wages for actual labor, payments for powder and fuses plus 10 per cent of 
said amounts which were to be in full for all advances, shanties, pay of 
foremen above ordinary labor, general supervision, clerk hire, agents, 
personal care, etc. Upon receiving the contract, part was sublet and the 
contractor charged his 10 per cent upon the subcontractors' charges to him. 
The court held that since there was no specification against subletting, and 
as "wages" might be paid either for time or piece work, hence payment 
made to subcontractors were "wages" for actual labor upon which he could 
properly charge his 10 per cent. 

These are but a few of the cases which show that as a matter of fact 10 
per cent upon the usual basis of "cost" is really a very small percentage, 
which ordinarily would give the contractor little or no real profit. These 
cases also show that an owner may pay from 20 per cent to even 50 per cent 



64 The Architect and Engineer 

on the usual "cost," and yet only pay what the work is reasonably worth. 
In this connection the owner eliminates the extra charge which a contractor 
always adds to his bid to take care of unknown contingencies. As a matter of 
policy, it is naturally much preferable to make the defined "cost" include all 
possible expenses of every nature and keep the percentage down, although 
for purposes of giving a greater range to competitive bids it may at times be 
deemed otherwise. 

These cases thus show that the protection of the owner depends largely 
upon the contract provisions regarding subletting. Of course a general 
contractor must be permitted to subcontract his plumbing work, since that 
class of work is in many cities restricted to registered and licensed 
plumbers. Again, a general contractor who makes a specialty of founda- 
tions and mason work should be permitted to subcontract his steel work, 
since he could not possibly do that character of work as cheaply as the 
others making that a specialty. Hence this is where the architect should 
be given some discretion to approve or disprove of subcontracts and their 
amounts, since the cost to the owner depends so largely upon such sub- 
contracts. 

The care with which the definition of "cost" must be scrutinized is well 
shown by a very late case in which the "cost" was fully defined, but un- 
fortunately for the owner contained the phrase "cost of accidents." During 
the work an employee of the contractor's was badly hurt and recovered 
judgment against them of $27,000. As this award was affirmed upon appeal 
the company had to pay, and they then asked the owner to reimburse them 
as it was part of the defined cost. The owner refused on the ground that it 
was not reasonable to charge him with such a judgment under the wording 
mentioned. However, the court ruled against him and held that the inter- 
pretation of the phrase by the company was correct and the owner must 
pay. 

While these suggestions and cases show that the cost plus contract has 
its pitfalls for the owner, yet there are really very few of serious import, 
and the advantages suggested are so great that there are times when it 
would undoubtedly be of advantage to the architect to use this form of 
contract. 

Architect's Duties. As has been previously stated, there is practically 
no difference between the architect's duties under the cost plus form as 
differentiated from the lump sum form. This is well illustrated in a late 
case where the owner refused to pay a contractor because the side walls 
were not watertight and because the same condition existed in the roof and 
around the windows. The contract was a percentage contract and the 
proof showed that the contractor had carefully followed the plans and 
specifications of the architect, which were very detailed. The court held 
that as far as the contractor was concerned the owner warranted the suf- 
ficiency of the plans, and hence there was no liability against the con- 
tractor on these scores. That opinion also meant that the owner could 
probably recover against the architect for the insufficiency of his profes- 
sional work. 

Hence we can take it as our general rule that the architect has the same 
liabilities and duties under these forms of contract as under the lump sum 
contract. 

Relation of Owner and Contractor. There are times when it is essen- 
tial that the architect should know whether the party doing the construc- 
tion work is a so-called independent contractor or merely the agent of the 
owner. That question has been the subject of probably as much litigation 



The Arcliitcct and Engineer 65 

as any other one matter, especially where questions of liability for accidents 
have been involved. 

Clearly in our third form of cost plus contract suggested at tlie com- 
mencement of this article, where the owner hires a building superintendent 
only, the relation created would be master and servant. In such a rela- 
tionship the owner becomes responsible for accidents and also for the result 
of the work. Some illustrations wilFshow the differences in the relations. 
Where an owner made a contract with two partners to furnish teams and 
men for certain work, one of the partners to be always present as foreman 
under the direction of the owner's foreman ; where the partners received 
pay as foremen at a certain sum per day and the men, materials, and ex- 
penses were paid for at cost and bills rendered therefor with a certain per- 
centage added for profit, the court held that the partners w'ere the servants 
of the owner. On the other hand, where a contractor enters into an agree- 
ment with the owner whereby he engages to purchase the material, employ 
the labor, and superintend and erect a building pursuant to plans in hand ; 
where the contractor is to render a true account of purchases and payrolls, 
to use his best endeavors to secure material and labor at the lowest prices 
and guarantees that the workmanship shall be first class ; where the owner 
is to pay the estimated net cost of materials and labor and a fixed sum 
called a commission, the court held that such a contractor was an inde- 
pendent contractor and hence he alone could sue a third person for the dam- 
ages resulting from the negligent construction of a portion of the building 
uqder a contract made with him. 

The test has been said to be, "Who has the general control of the work? 
Who has the right to direct what shall be done and how to do it?" Yet it 
has been held time and again that the right reserved to an owner to dis- 
charge any workman does not make the contractor a servant, and the same 
is true of the privilege of inspecting and supervising the work. It is only 
when the owner can and does attend to the details that the relation of mas- 
ter and servant is created. The mere fact that there is no contract and no 
plans, and that the person employed to do the work is paid by the day, does 
not create the relation of master and servant where the person is employed 
to accomplish a certain object, the mode, manner, and means being left en- 
tirely to the person's skill and judgment. 

Thus we see that generally there is no more chance of the owner becom- 
ing a master and hence responsible for accidents, etc., in cost plus contracts 
than in the usual lump sum form. As this fear often causes the owner to 
refuse to use the cost plus form where it should be used, it is hoped that 
this may allay such suspicions and doubts. 

Conclusions. Our considerations would seem to show that the cost plus 
contracts have advantages which some architects and owners have failed 
to take into account. Especially where it is used in connection with a 
maximum limit of cost it should give the best satisfaction to all concerned 
unless some means of accurate quantity surveying with a suitable contract 
is used, or unless the contractor or architect is dishonest. The owner may 
be safeguarded by the architect's careful attention to the following items : 
the contract definition of cost; the contract provisions regarding the per- 
centage or fixed sum to be paid, subcontracts, maximum limit of owner's 
liability, and constant supervision with honest and accurate checking of all 
costs. If the owner were assured of the saving both in money and annoy- 
ance which is possible with this form of contract, he should be willing to 
pay the architect a greater compensation for his increased services, and also the 
additional expenses necessary for the proper checking of the contractor's figures. 



65 The Architect and Eiit^iiieer 

The Responsibility for Incompetence 

MR. KRUSE'S paper on "The High Cost of Incompetence," which was 
printed in the January Architect and Engineer, with comments by 
Mr. F. W. Fitzpatrick, consulting architect of Washington, has pro- 
voked some bitter denunciation of the writers of these articles from mem- 
bers of the profession all over the coast. If we were to publish the flood of 
letters, pro and con, it would make interesting reading, indeed. An owner 
in Portland writes even more forcibly than Mr. Kruse. Mr. Kruse himself 
thinks that he may not have made himself quite plain in some of his state- 
ments. 

"It is possible," he says, "that the article will be misconstrued by certain 
members of your profession, and in such event I will be glad to reply to any 
questions that they may see fit to propound. In my opinion the subject 
under discussion is one of vital interest to both the owner and to the archi- 
tectural profession. It is true the article does not state all the facts." 

William Mooser, former president of San Francisco Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects, was shown Mr. Kruse's article before it 
was printed. After reading it Mr. Mooser wrote us as follows : 

"Personally I cannot see any reason for withholding its publication. 
Of course it can be answered, and no doubt will be. I cannot see where the 
architect is any diiiferent professionally than the lawyer. Think of a man 
iiaving a case involving hundreds of thousands of dollars, employing an 
incompetent lawyer — loses case — where's the redress? The same applies 
to the physician — patient dies — but where is the redress?" 

Mr. Frederick L. Ackerman, chairman of the Committee on Public In- 
formation of the American Institute of Architects, takes exactly the stand 
advocated by this magazine, that "a rigid license law (properly enforced) 
should prevail in every State, making the requirements for admission to 
practice most stringent, and thereby ridding the architectural profession of 
incompetents." Mr. Ackerman g-oes on to say: 

"The architect of repute desires a license law which will require and 
insist upon competency in all of his functions, not a part already provided 
for by other ordinances. Not until our courts and legislatures provide laws 
which recognize the essential functions of the architect can the owner hope 
for any material aid from that source. 

"Integrity cannot be legislated into a profession any more than 
righteousness can be legislated into an unrighteous people. The American 
Institute of Architects is actually accomplishing a great deal toward elevat- 
ing the standards of practice of the whole profession, but its powers are indeed 
small when compared with those possessed b}' that great group — the clients. 
Upon those who build rests equally the burden of elevating the standards of 
practice. This cannot be done by ruthlessly destroying the whole fabric which 
the Institute has built up through years of effort. Through more business-like 
methods in selecting an architect, and a more thoughtful consideration of 
the aims of his profession, can the standard of architectural practice and 
building be elevated. Just so long as the architect is chosen upon the basis 
of price alone, or just so long as he is chosen regardless of qualifications 
and professional standing — so long will there exist a group of dissatisfied 
clients belaboring the entire architectural profession." 

* . * 

The steamer Manchuria brought from China in the latter part of 
September, 140 tons of building material, artistic wood carving and special 
fittings for the Chinese pavilion and temple at the Exposition. 









GENERAL VIEW OF WINTER GARDEN. CHICAGO 

The Aesthetic in Concrete 

THE widespread use of Portland cement concrete in heavy foundation work, 
piers and abutments, warehouses, factory buildings, streets and roads, has 
led many people to believe that concrete is adaptable only to the heavier 
types of construction, and entirely unsuited for finer craftsmanship. 

When consideration is taken of the fact that Portland cement is compara- 
tively a new material and that it has been generally used only one decade, it is 
not surprising that greater advances have not been made in the use of Portland 
cement as a decorative material. 

It is a fact that concrete is almost an ideal material for ornamental uses and 
elaborate designs. Concrete lends itself most readily to duplication. While the 
possibilities of concrete in ornamental work are almost unlimited, the scarcity 
of good examples of such work are largely due to the scarcity of artisans with 
ability to plan and execute ornamental structures. However, a few examples of 
decorative concrete which have been produced within the last few years, have 
been an incentive to architects and builders to experiment with Portland cement, 
and it is safe to say that great advances of an aesthetic nature will be noted 
from now on. 

One of the latest examples of beauty and utility in concrete is the Midway 
Gardens in Chicago. This structure is doubtless the most unique architectural 
conception in the world. 

Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Midway Gardens and Mr. A. lannelli 
supervised the modeling of figures and panels. 

In idea, the Midway Gardens are modeled after the gardens of Germany and 
other Continental European countries. Instead of the stiflf rows of benches 
which have characterized other American parks of similar intent, the interior 
court is dotted with small white tables and chairs at which the audience may 
supplement its appreciation of music with a cooling glass or a comforting 
supper. 

Architecturally, the gardens are modeled after nothing European. They are 
not an attempt to reproduce a Greek temple or a Swiss chalet, but are purely 
and originally American. They bear upon them unmistakably the stamp of 
their architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, with their continuous horizontal lines and 
low, broad overhanging eaves. Throughout the whole, concrete is the pre- 
dominating feature. Some of the walls and columns are partly of cream colored 
brick, setting off the grey concrete work admirably, but the construction is 
fundamentally concrete. And the most wonderful part of it all, is the intricacy 
of some of the designs executed in concrete — elaborate sculpture with some- 
thing of the oriental suggested in its delicate traceries. Those who see in 
concrete only a material to be used in bulky masses will be confounded by the 
results achieved here. 



68 



The Architect and Engineer 




DECORATIVE SCULPTURE -QUEEX OF THE CARDE.WS" 
MAIN CORSICE OF UTXTER GARDEN, CHICAGO 
FRANK LLOYD H RIGHT, ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Engineer 



69 



» • tu 




ARCADE BALCOXy. SHOIIiyc DETAILS OF COXSTRCCTIOS' 
FRAXK LLOYD II RIGHT, ARCHITECT 



70 



The Architect and Eit(;iiiecr 




CORNER OF SUMMER GARDEX. SHOlflXG ARCADE 
TERMINAL AND ORNAMENTAL LIGHT POLE 
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Engineer 



71 




COLORED DECORATION OX NATURAL CEMENT 
PLASTER IN TAVERN, MIDIVAY GARDENS. CHICAGO 
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT. ARCHITECT 



72 



The Architect and Engineer 







12 a: (V. 



The Architect and Engineer 



72, 










SS-^ 



74 



The Architect and Enzineer 




S* 









The Architect and Engineer 



75 




■ENTRANCE TO MIDIVAY GARDENS, CHICAGO 
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT. ARCHITECT 



76 



The Architect and Engineer 




DECORATIVE SCULPTURE AT MIDWAY GARDENS, CHICAGO 
Frank Lloyd Wright. Architect 



The Architect and Engineer 77 

Professional Courses in Landscape Gardening at the 
University of California 

By PROFESSOR JOHN W. GREGG 

LANDSCAPE gardening, often called landscape architecture, or landscape 
engineering, is the art of improving land for human use and enjoyment in 
such a manner as to secure the maximum of beauty combined with the 
maximum of practical utility. It is now recognized as a most pleasant and 
profitable profession in which men of ability can find congenial and useful 
employment. The professional course is designed to furnish instruction both 
theoretical and practical, so that men of artistic ability may become successful 
practitioners of the art or competent draughtsmen ; men of business instincts 
may become contractors, and men of managerial ability may become foremen or 
superintendents of construction or maintenance. In its various phases the pro- 
fession offers desirable openings for a limited number of well trained men ; to 
untrained men, little or no opportunity. 

Elementary work in landscape gardening has been offered in the College of 
.\griculture for a number of years, but not until January. 1913, was there a 
definitely prescribed professional course leading to the degree of B. S. 

The work as now offered combines with the professional courses in land- 
scape gardening, the essentials of a liberal education, aiming to give the student 
a broad foundation for his future work as a professional landscape architect ; to 
this end subjects common to all courses in the College of Agriculture are con- 
sidered fundamental and preparatory to those of a more highly specialized 
character to follow. In addition to the professional courses, instruction of an 
untechnical nature is offered for those who wish to become familiar with the 
fundamental principles governing the art, to the extent that they may be appre- 
ciative of correct design and all that is beautiful in the landscape. 

As landscape architecture is now recognized as an art and as a profession, 
the aesthetic and practical sides of the profession are emphasized throughout the 
course, the practice in design being given a most important place in the schedule 
of courses. 

The division is equipped with a very large draughting room with overhead 
light and furnished with all the instruments, draughting tables and other equip- 
ment necessary for strictly first-class professional work in landscape design ; 
while on the shelves in the University Library may be found all the best litera- 
ture dealing with the art in this and other countries. In addition to this litera- 
ture, the division maintains in its own offices and draughting rooms other 
literature in the form of park, city and town planning reports, and in the Agri- 
cultural Library may be found all State and Government bulletins dealing with 
this and allied subjects. An herbarium of several hundred specimens especially 
collected and mounted for instructional purposes in plant materials, is also an 
important part of the equipment. This herbarium seeks to include specimens of 
all the latest and choice materials introduced into the State as it may show value 
for landscape planting. 

California offers wonderful opportunities for the study at first-hand of 
landscape problems of all kinds, from the design of small suburban lots to the 
municipal parks and park systems of the larger cities, including city and town 
planning and real estate subdivision work. The L'niversity campus and grounds 
of the various sub-stations. Golden Gate Park, and the many large nurseries, all 
furnish opportimities for study of plant materials and their adaptability for 
landscape work. Considerable space on the University campus is devoted to the 
propagation and raising of ornamental nursery stock. It is important that one 



78 The Architect and Engineer 

should recog-nize the fact that because of the variable climatic and soil conditions 
as well as the extensive ornamental flora both native an exotic, that men trained 
in California are better able to appreciate and solve the problems in landscape 
design peculiar to this coast. 

The requirements for admission to the four-year professional course are the 
same as those for the College of Agriculture, and detailed information concern- 
ing entrance requirements will be found in the various announcements of the 
University, which may be secured by addressing the Recorder. University of 
California. Berkeley. California. Students looking forward to taking landscape 
gardening should take, during their high school course, such subjects as French, 
German, Chemistry, Botany and as much freehand and instrumental drawing 
as possible. 

In addition to the regular prescribed course for each semester, each student 
is required to take a summer practice course at the end of the Sophomore year 
for the purpose of giving them an insight into the works of their chosen pro- 
fession, such work being carried on ju.st as in actual practice. 

In addition to the major subjects students are required to elect numerous 
allied subjects in other departments of the University. Such subjects include 
courses in architecture, civil engineering, botany, soils, fertilizers, entomology, 
plant pathology, forestry and drawing, descriptions of which may be noted in 
the Announcement of Courses. 

In addition to the undergraduate course leading to the B. D. degree, oppor- 
tunity is offered for advanced or post graduate study in "Modern Civic Art" 
and "City and Town Planning." 



Shape of Office Buildings More Important than Height 

IN the course of the campaign for the present Minneapolis ordinance 
limiting the height of buildings a man who was a student of office build- 
ing problems advanced the proposition that it is better, cheaper and 
more profitable to carefully shape buildings to the lots they are to occupy 
than to limit the height of the structures. Virtuall}' he advocated no limit, 
but he insisted on careful planning which would give every user of the 
building all possible light and ventilation. This man was W. L. Brackett, 
of Minneapolis, who at that time seemed abotit to carry to success a project 
for a modern twenty-five-story office building on the corner of Second 
avenue South and Fourth street. The outbreak of war in Europe caused 
a postponement of the enterprise. 

There are three types of high buildings for downtown business pur- 
poses, according to Mr. Brackett — the L-shaped. the I-shaped and the 
T-shaped. There is no doubt whatever in his mind that the only shape 
which will stand all tests of scientific examination for utility, light, air, 
desirability of space, least cost of construction per foot of space, economy 
of operation, and finally, profit on the investment, is the L-shape. 

The chief claims for the superiority of the L-shaped structure for a 
corner lot are : That it gives the great amount of floor area susceptible 
of proper lighting; that it is more economical to build; that it is so much 
better than an E-shaped or U-shaped building that there is no comparison, 
but on the contrary, a sharp contrast of attractive oiilice space because in 
the L-shaped building all offices are outside offices. These advantages 
produce a greater rental. The L-shaped building is more nearly independent of 
adjacent building's than any other kind. The same area as in buildings 
occupying more ground space is produced without more outlay by making 



The Architcit and Engineer 79 

it higher; that is, a seventeen-story, L-shaped buildinn;, according to Mr. 
Brackett, will cost no more than a twelve-story U-shaped or E-shaped 
structure and yet produce more rental since all the offices would be light 
and desirable, and a great deal more general satisfaction among the patrons. 
Mr. Brackett maintains that it is unscientific and unprofitable, both for 
tenants and for general city conditions to create conditions in a business 
building which compel the occupants to use artificial light a great deal or 
all the time. It is a serious mistake from any point of view to do this 
when, by a little more effort and scientific study of the problem a building can 
be erected which will furnish bright and attractive rooms for all. 



Does it Pay a Contractor to Advertise? 

<<\ Y /E don't need to advertise. An advertisement won't bring us a job. 

Y^y It's the man with the sharp pencil that lands nowadays." 

It was a big San Francisco contractor speaking. He went on: 
"They all know me — the architects, I mean. I've been in the game for 
years. No, I have no office in Los Angeles or up. in Portland, but I'd figure 
a job in either place if it looked good to me." 

This fellow may understand the contracting game, all right, but he's 
got a lot to learn about other things. He thinks they all know him because 
he has been in the game since before the San Francisco earthquake and 
fire. Wonder if he ever stopped to think how many new architects have 
come into the field since then. It's a safe bet that ten out of twelve of these 
newcomers never heard of this "well-known pioneer builder," as he is wont 
to style himself. 

"The architects don't read the ads any way," this fellow went on. "They 
look at the pictures." 

They don't read the ads, eh? Well, they do. A Fresno architect who 
does quite a little figuring in the course of a year dropped into our office 
the other day. Beneath his arm he carried a late issue of The Architect 
.and Engineer. He had a lot of the advertising pages turned- down and 
a blue pencil mark indicated the addresses of firms he intended to call upon 
while in the city to have them figure some plans. That's only a single 
instance to prove that an advertiser is getting something in return for his 
investment — though it is oftentimes extremely difficult for him to appre- 
ciate it. 

The other day one of the biggest architects in San Francisco called us 
up on the 'phone. 

"I've been looking through my copies of The Architect and Engineer," 
he said, "and can find but one San Francisco contractor who maintains 
a Los Angeles office. Do you know of any other San Francisco builder 
who figures work in Southern California? I have a big job down there 
that I want figured." 

We thought of the contractor who was so well known that he didn't 
need to advertise and who would figure on Los Angeles or Portland work if 
he got the chance. We gave the architect his name. 

"Why, how funny," said the architect, "I never heard of the man before. 
Has he done much building?" 

We hope this contractor will read this. Maybe it will take some of the 
"importance" out of him, and we hope the contractors who are advertis- 
ing with us will read it, too. It should convince them of the value of 
publicity. 



80 The Architect and Engineer 

A Uniform Building Code 

By F. W. FITZPATRICK. 

IT HAS taken just twenty-five years of most insistent pounding to thor- 
oughly awaken this country to the fact that fire-destruction was wholly 
unnecessary and constituted one of the gravest menaces confronting the 
country and an unbearable tax upon its resources. This work of arousing 
has been well enough done so that today there are national and state and 
municipal fire-prevention societies doing splendid work everywhere, nearly 
all our states have established fire marshals' offices, there are journals 
devoted entirely to the advancement of fire protection, the other technical 
journals give much space to fire protection and the daily press devotes 
frequent and well written editorials to the work. There is no question but 
that the subject has l)een well agitated and that curative measures have to 
a degree been applied and still others right at hand. 

One of the hardest tasks in connection with this matter has been to make 
people forget that fire extinction was the sole salvation. For years, munic- 
ipal ambition has been to increase the efficiency and size of fire departments. 
Fire seemed inevitable and to put it out the only cure. And so very much 
that is combustible in the way of construction has been allowed that in very 
truth it is now almost impossible to staj^ the progress of fire, in large 
chunks of conflagration, until vast numbers of poorly built structures have 
been wiped out of existence by fire or voluntarily removed. So that highly 
organized fire departments are indeed most important. But, and that only 
within the last ten years, it has at last penetrated our national intelligence 
that if we couldn't absolutely prevent fire in the old fire traps we could at 
least not continue adding to them and that therein was the real spirit of 
fire prevention. And it was about time that this discovery should be made. 
We have reached, by reason of the poor construction that has been toler- 
ated, a pretty lofty pinnacle in the matter of fire destruction. A couple of 
thousand lives a year is not an unusual sacrifice, $250,000,000 worth of 
property burnt up, an average annual offering to the fire god, plus $300,000,- 
000 for the maintenance of fire departments, public and private, water 
service and all that sort of thing, and then about $200,000,000 a year more 
carried in to the insurance offices as premiums over and above the amount 
returned to the sufferers by fire in paid losses ! 

To insure that there will be no additions made to our burnable construc- 
tion it is also recognized that strict building regulations have to be written 
and enforced by state and municipality. This, sad to relate, is bound to 
involve some "politics." The authorities may fully realize the importance 
of the matter and that most drastic regulations are necessary, but they fear 
the results of enforcing that sort of thing. It might mean the incurring of 
the enmity of so-and-so or the other one who is interested in shabby con- 
struction, a jerry-builder, but one with political influence, so building regu- 
lations are usually gone at in a half-hearted way and the authorities seek 
to devise and apply not what is really needed, what is necessary, but merely 
what "the people will stand for." 

Just so soon as the revision of a building code is thought of or sug- 
gested, up goes a mighty howl, people declare the cost of building will be 
prohibitive, "improvements" to property cannot be made, it will be a hard- 
ship upon the poor man, it will raise rents and endless other knocks will be 
administered, foolish arguments, pure rot. There has always been oppo- 
sition to progress, the locomotive and automobile were fought by horse 
dealers, the telegraph and the telephone were opposed, curative liquor 



The Architect and Engineer 81 

legislation is fought tooth and nail by the liquor interests, and so it will 
always be with better building. It is opposed by the shysters who profit 
by inferior construction, the speculative builders, the jerry-men who build 
so that a house is literally held together by the paper on the walls, but so 
long as it stands up until it is sold to a gullible greenhorn then is it indeed 
all right. And these are the men who make the people generally believe 
that safe, reasonable building regulations are burdensome ! 

Perfect building is absolute economy ; fairly good construction is but a 
half-way measure and shoddy building is a criminal extravagance. That 
basic fact must ever be faced in devising regulations. A city full of good 
buildings means lessened maintenance cost for each owner, fewer repairs, 
a longer life for the buildings, much less tax for the maintenance of the 
fire department and that much less contribution to the swelling dividends 
of the insurance barons. It would mean millions of dollars saved, a great 
municipal problem solved and the lowering of rents generally, a boon, 
salvation to the life and property of both rich and poor. A city is but an 
aggregation of buildings and how can a city be a first class affair if it is 
filled with sixth class structures? And most of our cities are in greater 
part built up of not only sixth but tenth and twentieth class affairs. 

Now, when a state or city makes up its mind to adopt a new code or to 
revise the old one the usual procedure is to appoint a committee, an archi- 
tect, a builder, a sanitary engineer, or plumber, a couple of business men 
and perhaps a horse doctor to do the work, well-intentioned fellows in their 
lines, perhaps even experts, but almost invariably men who have had little 
or nothing to do with fire prevention and who wouldn't know a code if 
thev met it on the street, but perfectly willing to jump right in where 
angels would fear to tread. Endowed with brief authority they pull and 
twist the poor code thus and so and finally it is jammed through the legis- 
lative body and becomes a law, in 85 out of 100 cases an ill-devised law, 
silly in most of its requirements and inoperative, something that anyone 
can get around and really more of a hampering log than a benefit to building, 
and I venture to assert that the great bulk of building regulations in the 
country today is conceived in ignorance and carried out in perhaps still 
greater stupidity. 

It very largely comes about from our too great fondness for liberty, 
the battle cry of the American people and that has led us into many a pit- 
fall. It is beautiful to have an independent spirit, but it does certainly lead 
to all kinds of tribulations. Each state has, for instance, jammed through 
its divorce law, to suit some particular condition or legislator and utterly 
regardless of what the other states are doing, and we have a jumble of 
divorce legislation that is simply immoral in consequence and that is work- 
ing chaos in our social structure. As fool and diversified regulations 
hamper railroad travel. You may have a car window open in one state and 
not in another; you may guzzle to your heart's content passing through one 
countv and not have a drop of liquor even for sickness while going through 
the next one. Everywhere and in everything have regulations run riot. In 
the administration of law, in a thousand ways are our daily lives pestered 
by the lack of uniformity in the great essentials of the controlling forces 
that should properly regulate the routine of that life. In no branch is 
there as great diversity as there is in the building regulations and in few 
other affairs should there be greater uniformity. It is so essentially an 
interstate matter. Transportation is so easy that the manufacture of build- 
ing materials is no longer a local enterprise, but is centralized at great 
shipping points, hence the need for recognizing uniform standards for those 



82 The Architect and Engineer 

building materials ; builders and investors are interested in construction 
in many states and cities and everywhere are they confronted by fresh and 
puzzling building regulations. It's all a jumble, a hodge-podge, and there 
certainly exists a most crying need that building regulations be properly 
codified and uniformly adopted throughout the land. 

Why should a twelve-inch brick wall be allowed to carry so many tons 
load in one city and so many tons more in a town ten miles away? Look at 
the thing detail by detail and any layman, however unfamiliar with con- 
struction, cannot fail to recognize how ridiculous the present lack of uni- 
formity really is. 

Instead of the usual mode of procedure in such matters, the appointing 
of a local committee to revise the building code, there should be made a 
united elYort to have the states pass uniform state building regulations that 
will control in every city and in every burg throughout each state. Then 
if above and beyond that any city wants to have more stringent regulations, 
in its endeavor to shine pre-eminently in the perfection of its buildings, 
well and good. But, basically, there would be a common, uniform law. 
Federal regulations, as have been suggested, might perhaps be the ideal 
solution of the problem, but there is a constitutional barrier to such and 
regulations of that nature must emanate from state or municipal authori- 
ties. 

The National Board of Underwriters and other societies of experts have 
worked zealously and for years to devise such a code as could be uniformly 
adopted. The latest model code published is the one devised by the Inter- 
national Society of Building Commissioners. It incorporates the best of 
everything that has gone on before and is the work not of any haphazard 
and inexperienced committee but of experts who have given a lifetime to 
the study and practical administration of such laws. The writing of the 
Code was begun just twenty-seven years ago and is virtually the cumulative 
cyclopedia of building information that has been compiled during that 
period then boiled down and put in tersest form so as to be of as restricted 
compass as possible, regulations easily understood, easily administered and 
that would produce the very best results. Most of the other codes that 
have been at different times urged for adoption are cumbersome, too 
academic and involved. Naturally, I prefer and most earnestly urge this 
one with which I have had so much to do, but I also most earnestly believe 
that any uniform law is better than no uniformity at all and if the powers 
that be prefer some other code, that adopted by Chicago for instance, or 
the one that is pending now in New York or the Ohio state laws, well and 
good, let us vote for it, let us unite on something, but in heaven's name 
let us make an end of the present jumbly mess of regulations that confront 
us anew every few miles cf our terrestrial journey. 



Hardware! 

Hardware is the jewelry of the house fabric. Under ordinary circumstances 
its pattern and choice are governed by the same principal that govern the 
jewelry of a gentleman : it must be simple, of excellent design and utilitarian. 
If the jewelry is other than that, the chances are that it is a little outward indi- 
'cation that the gentleman is but a "gent." — •House and Garden. 

We've often wondered whether "hardware" didn't derive its name, in the 
first place, from the hard things folks found to say about the men who 
selected it. — Philadelphia Builder's Guide. 



The Architect and Engineer 83 

The Building of It 

By HENRY A. HOYT 

THE transformation of a piece of the shore of the bay of San Francisco from 
its natural contour to the present state of architectural and horticultural 
beauty, as exemplified in the Panama-Pacific Exposition, was not entirely 
an easy task. Only one who has followed the triumphant building of this 
great fair, step by step, week by week, from its ground-breaking to the pres- 
ent state of completion, can appreciate the remarkable and rapid growth. 
Other expositions have had at least terra firma to build on ; this stands largely 
on filled soil, within a very few feet of the waters of the Pacific. This, in 
itself, was quite an obstacle that has, however, been easily overcome. 

A prominent official of the exposition stated publicly recently that "This 
Fair has been built and developed by the press." In other words, he gives 
the credit of success to what we call publicity. This word has become very 
important in recent years and is now a national by-word with a very well under- 
stood and conveyed meaning. The fact is. the whole exposition itself is nothing 
but a great big piece of publicity, or to speak more plainlw a great big advertis- 
ing scheme. 

As an achievement, it is a Coast product, a California exploit, another San 
Francisco triumph ! 

A great degree of the credit for the building of this wonderful fair has not 
publicly been placed or acknowledged. The writer refers to the vast army of 
men who directly or indirectly brought about the actual building of it ; con- 
tractors, subcontractors, material men, engineers, superintendents and finally, 
the actual workmen themselves who really wrought it out with head and hands. 
We speak out here on the Coast of general contractors, but to use a war term 
we might consistently call them contracting generals. 

With remarkably few exceptions, the same men who rebuilt San Francisco 
after 1906 built the fair. At least it can be said that it was erected by San 
Francisco builders, and the exceptions to this statement will be proud to be 
classed with the building fraternity of .the city. 

The writer has been told by builders who have been connected with the 
construction of other great fairs that our exposition is "too well built." Another 
credit mark to those who designed and built it. .\ well-known publisher of 
the East viewed the fair a few days ago and his first expression was one of 
regret that it had to be -"temporary." 

The builders of this exposition are a modest lot of fellows. They have done 
their duty well, with little noise and too little publicity. They have signed 
their contracts, put a roll of blue prints under their arm and gone out to the 
filled sand lot, erected a little field office, and proceeded to organize a force 
and "get busy." If they lost money, few have heard of it, and likewise, if they 
made money they put it in their pockets and said nothing. 

' The average visitor to the fair this year will admire the buildings, will 
marvel at their size, their beauty of color, their architectural completeness and 
perfection, but few will see the buildings as they stand from a real builder's 
viewpoint. To the small number who do it will be a great treat and an inspira- 
tion to go and do greater and better things as builders. 

Lumbermen from the Middle West and elsewhere will admire the size 
and strength of the native timbers from which all the buildings are constructed. 
Any real builder, using the term in its broadest sense, will find his eyes wander- 
ing away from the exhibits upwards to the structure itself. Mental estimates 
of quantities will be made, but naturally will be very inaccurate. For instance, 
it will be hard to realize that the great Machinery Hall has over 7,000,000 



84 The Architect and Engineer 

feet of good lumber embodied in its great frame. Incidentally, it took sixteen 
hundred tons of bolts and truss rods to properly and safely tie it together, to 
say nothing of a few carloads of spikes and nails. Nearly 1,700 tons of struc- 
tural steel went into the famous Tower of Jewels. That great glass dome of 
the beautiful Palace of Horticulture has about twenty-five thousand square feet 
of wire glass in it, or somewhere around forty-four tons of glass. 

The barn builders of the great agricultural districts of the country will 
appreciate "plank-framing," and balloon framing and truss construction out 
at the fair. If they do not get it all covered up with the finish, the peculiar 
strength and bolting of the beautiful Argentine building will interest and 
enlighten. The writer would dislike to fall into the hole created in Nevada 
and Utah by the tons and tons of plaster used to cover the frames of all the 
buildings. One roofing concern estimated the roofing of their make used in 
"acres" and not in the usual measure of "squares." 

It is needless to say that we of the Coast who have to do with the building 
business in one way or another are proud of the fair, and proud of those who 
built it. 



Lessons from the Edison Fire 

IT may be ventured that no occurrence of the kind in recent years has 
attracted more attention in constructional circles than the fire early in 

December which destroyed the greater part of the Edison plant at West 
Orange, N. J. 

The fire started in the Film Inspection building — a one-story sheet iron 
structure located in about the center of the plant. The contents of this 
building were highly inflammable, and the fire spread rapidly to the adjoin- 
ing buildings. The principal reasons assigned for the extent of the disas- 
ter are interesting in view of the manner in which an examination of the 
structures showed the small damage sustained by the concrete buildings. 
The experts employed to make a survey after the fire reported 87^/2 per 
cent of the concrete construction in first-class condition. The damage was 
attributed to: (1) the highly inflammable character of the contents of the 
building; (2) the inadequacy of the water supply; (3) the fact that the 
window openings were fitted with wooden sashes and plain glass ; (4) lack 
of fire walls; (5) lack of automatic sprinklers. 

The plan reproduced herewith shows the location and type of the build- 
ings at the plant. With the exception of certain sections in Buildings 
24, 15 and 11, the concrete buildings were found in good condition. They 
were all standing, and the salvage of the contents will be large. This is 
held in marked contrast to the brick structures, where the collapse of the 
buildings resulted in heavy loss of contents. 

The following comment on the lack of proper fire-prevention measures 
is made editorially by the Engineering Record : 

"While chief interest would seem to center in the performance of the 
concrete buildings, the most important conclusion is a costly verification 
of one of the fundamentals of fire protection practice. This conclusion 
should be preached from the house-tops — that when structures are exposed 
to fire hazard from without it is folly to place one's trust in "fireproof" 
buildings fitted with wooden window sash and plain glass. The ruin at 
West Orange, thrown in relief by being linked with the great inventor's 
name, preaches that lesson to the matter-of-fact executive more strongly 
than all the fire-prevention documents ever written. Here was a plant 



The Architect and Engineer 



85 



Legend 

b'-o^w; h."t/"9 O^JnctfK/.CiTptfr- were r<ol aftxtred ty fkjmet. ^ 

bwUingi arr Cnr S/ariei ^>-gh. I j|^ ' — 



^D 




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LOCATION AND TYPE OF BUILDINGS AT THE EDISON PLANT 

with closely spaced buildings, all of them without the fire-protection pro- 
visions which long experience has demonstrated to be essential for the 
safeguarding of such structures. Moreover, there were no fire walls to 
prevent the spread of the flames from one adjoining building to the next, 
and none of the buildings were equipped with automatic sprinklers. The 
concrete buildings were considered "fireproof," but can be called so only 
by courtesy. They were not fireproof, except in the sense that they them- 
selves would not burn. They were virtually concrete stoves, with tinder 
at every window inviting the application of the torch. 

"As for the performance of the concrete buildings in so severe a test, 
one can happily report that they came through very well. It is safe to 
say that four of the seven are in their entirety usable. In two of the 
remaining buildings the damage is local, affecting parts of four floors, while 
in the third the columns in the first floor are in very bad condition." 



One Meaning of Brick 



IT is no mean testimony to the value of the first of all building materials 
that to call a man a "brick" is about the highest compliment we can pa}' 
him. Franklin Matthews, an American war correspondent, while sta- 
tioned near Mukden, met Field Marshal Oyama, and became so impressed 
with his personality and excellent education that he wrote a two-hundred 
word cablegram home, in which, among other things, he said : "I find 
Marshal Oyama a brick." This was sent to the interpreter, who translated 
it in Japanese and sent both copies to the army censor. That afternoon 
Matthews was questioned by the commanding captain regarding the cable- 
gram, and especially concerning the expression, "You are a brick." Mat- 
thews explained to him that in America when you called a man a "brick" 
you meant that he was a "splendid chap — fair and square, and all that." 
The captain smiled the Japanese smile and said: "Your interpreter was 
very clumsy. He translated the word '^brick' literally, making it read 'a 
lump of dried mud,' which puzzled me greatly. I am glad of your explana- 
tion." 



86 



The Architect and Engineer 







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BLOCK PLA\. CITY OF CALGARY 



City Planning and Housing 



Edited by CH^RLES HENRY CHENEY 



Purpose of this Department 

THIS department is aimed to call attention to the important advances in 
city planning and housing taking place in the world, and we shall 
endeavor to bring to your notice the principal City Planning Reports 
as they are issued, current comments in the various periodicals and other 
publications, and reviews of such books as seem worth while. 

While architects have displaced their chief interest in city planning and 
housing on the esthetic side of the problem, we know that few schemes can 
be put into practical execution without an equal presentation and study of 
the economic and social sides. 

We propose to offer in illustrations the latest city plans, civic centers 
and housing solutions to answer aesthetic interest, and publish brief sum- 
maries of economic reports and social surveys. The history of well exe- 
cuted city planning and housing schemes everywhere shows that a strong 
"social sense" is necessary to the successful handling of these problems. 

The illustrations for this month are taken from a preliminar_\- city plan 
report on Calgary, Canada, by Thomas H. Mawson & Sons, English city 
planning experts. This report will be reviewed in a later number. 
* * * * 
Business Slums 

The safety of your health is determined not by your own mode of living, 
but by that of your worst housed and poorest neighbor. You must be the 
keeper of your neighbor's health in order to safeguard your own and that of 
those nearest to you. 

There are in our cities business as well as residential slums. Skyscrapers 
in which thousands of people work without proper air and light are as dan- 
gerous as houses in the building of which light and air are not the first con- 
sideration. 

Industry, business and home life may flourish in the same community if 
they are distributed according to an intelligent community plan. Without a 
plan, moral, sanitary and economic slums are created. 

Wage earners are seeking the peace and comfort of the exclusive suburban 
communities. Their ignorance and the speculator's greed are bringing the 
slums into the open country. Not to prevent this is wasteful for the present 
and unjust to the future. — Dr. Carol Aronovici, in Town Development. 




SECTIOX THROUGH CIVIC CEXTER, CALGARY 
5/ioti'iiig Bridge Across to Princes Island 



The Architect and Engineer 




THE CIVIC CEM'ER, CALGARY 



The Tenth Annual Convention of the American Civic Association, 
Washington, D. C, December 2-4, 1914. 

Housing and Toivn Planning — By far the most important figure at this 
convention was Mr. Thomas Adams, the foremost town planning expert of 
England, recently brought to Canada. The Conservation Commission of 
Canada decided last spring that the greatest work they could do for the 
country was to conserve humans, and accordingly they have brought JMr. 
Adams from England to study and suggest the remedy for the housing, san- 
itation and other town planning problems of the Dominion. 

In England, the public could not be aroused to do much about the housing 
problem until they saw a way out. The garden cities of England, while not 
by any means a final solution of the housing problem, furnish a social object 
lesson — a handle by which the public could grasp the possibility of giving 
every family a comfortable home with plenty of light, air and a garden for 
a small rental. Town planning, which is merely civic forethought, is now 
being applied to large areas of all English cities by law, and the slum is being 
driven out. 

Art Commissions in Practice — The other topics of the convention hinged 
about the various sides of living conditions in our cities. Mr. Andrew Wright 
Crawford of Philadelphia, showed by most striking lantern slides the designs 
for public buildings as they were submitted and as the Art Jury of Phila- 
delphia finally succeeded in getting them designed. How can the American 
people, and we in California, distinguish between the mediocre" and the best 
in architecture, sculpture and painting or in fine landscapes and parks, if 
we set up no standards for the general public to compare new things with? 
At present we have no standards. We react to certain designs and forms 
as occasion or impulse dictates. California can gain much by getting the 
Legislature to establish a State Art Commission which shall hold up the 
artistic standard in all public work, and encourage art education and enjoy- 
ment for everybody. 



The Architect and Engineer 89 

Whether the subject was system in city building, beauty or commercial 
prosperity, bill boards, sky scrapers or parks, nearly every speaker came back 
to city planning as the only way for our cities to successfully overcome the 
difficulties with these problems. Constructive planning ahead by a perma- 
nent City Planning Commission was the unanimous judgment offered. A 
great many speakers showed clearly the great economy that such a commis- 
sion, with sensible exercise and forethought, could effect. 

Planning Ahead Pays — In speaking of system in city building. jMr. John 
Nolen, vice-president of the association, very ably summed up the subject. 
He said : 

"All successful enterprises of magnitude have been planned enterprises ; 
they have not come about by chance. In city planning we recognize that 
millions of dollars in money and many things more precious than money 
have been wasted because of lack of plan. Our streets, our parks, our recrea- 
tion places, our houses and homes, give ample evidence of all this. The first 
step, it would seem, toward the solution of our social and industrial prob- 
lems is a comprehensive plan. We need transportation plans to solve our 
transportation problems ; we need a zone plan to district our 'cities, to give 
stability to land values and to protect districts ; we need an industrial dis- 
trict plan in order to give efficiency to industry, and we need a plan for the 
homes for the workers, because, without a plan, there is not the slightest 
prospect that they will be properly housed. Commercial efficiency rests upon 
rapid and cheap transportation of merchandise, upon the proper location of 
water and rail terminals and facilities, upon distributing routes and upon 
contented people in good homes with playgrounds." 

* * 

San Francisco Chapter Holds Splendid Banquet 

SAN FRANCISCO CH.APTER, A. I. A., had one of the greatest gather- 
ings in its history the other evening. A world of credit must be given 
President Faville, who arranged the program and invited the guests. 
The affair was held at one of the leading down-town hotels. Henri Guil- 
laume, the architect sent by the French government to erect the French 
pavilion at the Panama-Pacific Exposition, was the guest of honor, and more 
than fifty leading architects of San Francisco were present, together with 
many members of the profession representing foreign nations. Among 
these were: J. H. Berner, representing Norway: Francisco Centurion, 
Cuba; C. J. Oakeshott and J. C. Morrel, Australia; E. Wright, Canada; G. 
Taheda and B. Ito, Japan. Henry Hornbostle, of New York, was also 
present. 

W. B. Faville, president of the San Francisco Chapter, presided. Willis 
Polk made the opening address, in which he paid a high tribute to the archi- 
tectural genius of the French nation, to which, he said, the whole world 
owed a debt of gratitude. 

J. C. Morrel of Australia, Henry Hornbostle, John Galen Howard and 
Arthur Brown, Jr., all paid tributes of appreciation to French architecture 
and its world-influence. 

Architect H. Ryan, Northern Bank building, Seattle, is preparing plans 
lor the new vaudeville theatre to be erected in San Francisco by IVIarcus 
Loew, the New York theatre magnate. Two locations have been under 
consideration for some time, one being the southeast corner of Market and 
Fourth streets and the other on the opposite side of Market street, farther 
west. The theatre will cost $500,000 and will be Class "A." 



90 



The Architect and Engineer 



KircnErr VARD 




f'IROT FT.OOR PLA^^ 









FIRST FLOOR PLAX. HOUSE OF 
MRS. JULIA B. CALPI.X. BERKELEY 
SIDXEY B. XEli'SOM. ARCHITECT 



The Architect and Encincer 



91 




^■^ y''- 



HOUSE AND YARD AND SECOND FLOOR PLAN 
HOME OF MRS. JULIA B. GALPIN, BERKELEY 
SIDNEY B. NEIVSOM, ARCHITECT 



92 The Architect and Engineer 

Interesting Experinnents With Glue Molds in 
•Reproducing Prehistoric Monuments 

By NEIL M. JUDD.* 

THIRTEEN visible stone monuments with the ruins of surrounding 
temples, pyramids, and ceremonial courts are all that remain of a once 
powerful religious community, near the present station of Ouirigua, 
Guatemala. Sixteen hundred years ago, if we may accept the figures of 
some students of Central American archeology, this empty city was active 
with the enthusiasm of its inhabitants; now the calls of jungle fowl echo 
through the enveloping silence. 

In an eiifort to preserve this home of a prehistoric people, the United 
Fruit Company has recently created a reservation of seventy-two acres, 
thus separating from its enormous banana plantations, a ruin the very 
existence of which remained unknown until 1840. During that year Mr. 
John L. Stephens, bearing special messages from the United States Gov- 
ernment to that of Guatemala, heard of the old city and sent his companion, 
Mr. F. Catherwood, to view the site. Mr. Catherwood's sketches, ac- 
companying Mr. Stephens' descriptions, introduced the Quirigua ruins to 
students of archeology. 

Forty-one years later, Mr. A. P. Maudslay, an English traveler, visited 
the ancient city. He secured hurried notes and photographs, but returned 
for more detailed observations during each of the two following' years and 
again in 1894. While continuing his investigations of 1883 and 1894, Mr. 
Maudslay secured paper squeezes and plaster piece-molds of several of the 
huge carved stones for which Quirigua is so justly famous. Subsequent 
American expeditions added to Maudslay's list of molds, notes and 
measurements but a systematic study of the Quirigua ruins had not been 
attempted, I believe, until Dr. Edgar L. Hewett, Director of the School of 
American Archaeology, began a series of excavations in January, 1910. 
With one exception, these excavations have been continued annually since 
that date and, during the expedition of the past winter, the most recent of 
the series, I was a chance associate, having in charge that phase of the 
work which these paragraphs consider. 

As a former religious centre of the Maya Indians, the old city of 
Quirigua consisted of a principal temple area, a large ceremonial court 
or plaza, and a number of associated temples and pyramids. The dwellings 
of its devotees were, supposedly, mere palm shelters scattered through the 
forest-covered valley for some distance beyond the priests' houses. 

Mother Nature and all the little elements at her command have been 
working for generations in their attempt to erase evidence of man's in- 
vasion of the Ouirigua jungle. Dripping water and swaying branches have 
cut and grooved the monument surfaces ; earthquakes and growing plants 
have split and broken the heavy stones, thus destroying, to a greater or 
less extent, the lines and carvings with which they were all decorated. 
When Maudslay first visited Quirigua, in 1881, the ruins were almost 
hidden in the dense forest; the sculptured stones were over-grown with a 
mat of vines and moss in which even large trees had taken root. This 
growth was removed at that time for photographic purposes but, owing to 
the tropical environment, the cleaning had to be repeated when the School 
of American Archaeology began its work and again when the recent 
expedition commenced operations in January of the present year. The 



' Written for this magazine. Mr. Judd is connected with the National Museum, Wasliington, D. C, 



The Architect and Ens-inecr 



93 




CHRIST CHURCH. LOS ALTOS, CALlFOR\'L-i 
Coxhead & Coxbead, Architects 



possibility of irreparable damage has rather hastened a realization of the 
necessity as well as desirability of reproducing these sculptures. 

The stone monuments at Quirigua are of two types ; tall stelae or 
shafts, with human figures carved on both faces and hieroglyphic tables on 
the shorter sides, and low, zoomorphic stones bearing similar inscriptions 
along the sides or front of the animal forms. Each stone was originally 
erected at the end of a Hotun or five-year period and its hieroglyphic 
inscriptions undoubtedly commemorated the important community events 
during that interval previous to the one in which the stone was raised. 
From an archeological point of view, these monuments are valuable not 
only as examples of prehistoric American sculpture, but also as records 
whose text may some day be intelligible to us and aid materially in broad- 
ening our meagre knowledge of the people who conceived them. 

Each monument was cut from a solid block of scoriaceous sandstone, 
that is, the stone consists mostly of volcanic scoria but also contains 
quantities of sand and coarse gravel. The action of the elements has 
loosened many exposed pebbles from their silica cement, thus adding small 
pitting's to the already rough, granular surface and increasing the dif- 
ficulties of mold-making by resisting all efforts to force an inflexible 
substance into perfect contact with the surface of the stone and by ten- 
aciously gripping that substance, once it had been properlj' driven into 
position. For such a superficial texture, glue proved the ideal agent since 
the material of the molds was placed in a liquid condition and its natural 
elasticity, when hardened, permitted great distortion in removal. 

Our process of mold-making was very simple. We began by building 
a light, plaster foundation around the base of the monument. This not 



94 The Architect and Engineer 

only prevented the escape of the melted glue but also supported the super- 
imposed forms which served as retaining walls for the glue molds. z\bove 
the foundation, a given section of the stone was covered with a layer of 
common clay mud, approximately one inch thick. Over this a carefully- 
joined plaster form was built, of such dimensions as the breadth of the 
monument and the depth of its carving required. On the larger stones, 
the size of the forms was often limited by our ability to handle them — 
lacking mechanical means of moving heavy masses, we seldom made forms 
in excess of fifteen square feet. 

During the construction of these forms, wooden braces were built into 
them and anchored with ties of fibre. Such supports increased the strength 
of the forms and, in addition, their extended ends proved a convenience in 
handling. Each form was completed, allowed to set, and its edges trimmed 
before an adjoining form was begun. Upon the completion of the four 
forms composing each section, all joints were secured with temporary 
ties of hemp and the working platforms raised for a second series. 

In this manner the whole surface of the monument was covered and 
then, commencing with the topmost form, we began the real process of 
mold-making. One complete, horizontal section was lowered each day, the 
subjacent layer of clay thrown aside, and the exposed stone surface 
thoroughly scrubbed, to remove what mud and lichenous growth still 
adhered. While the stone was drying, all irregularities on the inside of the 
four forms were scraped off and the surface painted with a thick coat of 
claj'-water, as an aid in separating form and glue mold. 

At the same time, glue tubs were placed over hot-water baths and their 
contents made ready for the daily pouring. That section of the monument 
to be reproduced and the inside surfaces of the waiting forms were 
thoroughly oiled with a composition composed of stearine, kerosine, and 
vaseline ; the forms were raised to their original position and all joints were 
tied and covered with plaster and hemp. In their "'original position," the 
forms were separated from the monument by an interstice equal to the 
thickness of the layer of clay over which they had been built. That space 
which the clay had occupied was later filled with melted glue. The thick- 
ness of the resulting glue molds, therefore, depended upon the thickness of 
the layer of clay they replaced. A section of the plaster form supported 
the back of each mold the face of which reproduced, in intaglio, the lines 
and carvings of the monument. From this counter-sunk, glue impression 
the cast was later taken. 

Those receptacles in which the glue was melted were ordinary, gal- 
vanized iron wash tubs, secured from the United Fruit Company stores. 
Two sizes were employed, one containing the glue and a larger one in 
which the first tub might be placed, the two being separated bv three or 
four small stones and a quantity of boiling water. The outer vessel rested 
upon metal rods or pointed stones, leaving space for a fire underneath ; the 
water it contained we kept at boiling heat until the glue had thoroughly 
melted, after which it was ready for the forms. 

Pouring the glue was a simple matter and required only a number of 
pails and men to pass them. Since the normal glue mold shnmk consider- 
ably in solidifying, we increased the width of the forms by adding a low 
rim of plaster to the top of each section and, by filling this enlarged form 
with glue, secured a slight over-lapping of the glue molds. This enabled 
us to trim them flush with the original edge of their plaster forms and 
assured perfect joints when the casts should be finally assembled. 
Through those forms that inclined from the perpendicular, airholes were 



TItc Architect and Engineer 95 

drilled and later closed with clay as the liquid glue, rising in the mold- 
space, began to flow from them. Improvised funnels were sometimes used 
in filling the glue-space, the weight of the liquid remaining in the funnel 
forcing possible air bubbles out of the glue molds and also counter-acting 
the effect of shrinkage along the upper edge of the mold. 

Glue molds must be thoroughly cooled and hardened before plaster 
casts may be taken from them. To better obtain this condition, our molds 
were usually poured at sundown and left undisturbed until daylight. Then, 
as quickly as possible, the forms were lowered and the glue molds prepared 
for casting. Great care was taken to protect these molds from even the 
early-morning sun since only a few moments" exposure ser\-ed to soften 
and melt-down the impression. 

The surfaces of the glue molds were first dusted with French chalk to 
remove any adhering grease. After this a saturated alum solution was 
carefully brushed into every pore of the mold surface. On an average, one 
hour passed before this solution had completely evaporated but it always 
left a thin coating of alum that hardened the glue surface and protected it 
materially from the heat generated by the setting of the plaster composing 
the casts. This alum-hardened surface was painted with a thin stearine- 
kerosine oil previous to casting. 

Our casts were made in the usual manner, that is, the face of each glue 
mold was covered with liquid plaster and this was added to until a desired 
thickness had been obtained. During the construction of the casts each 
was carefully re-enforced with wooden braces and hemp fibre to prevent 
warping and breaking. 

Each horizontal section of the reproductions of the stelte or upright 
monuments was composed of four parts, one for each side of the stone. 
These four parts, with their glue molds and supporting plaster forms, were 
usually bound together and braced from the inside before being separated 
from the glue molds. Since all plaster forms were constructed m conform- 
ation to the outline of the monument they reproduced, their corner joints 
were known to be exact, therefore, by carefulh' joining these forms and, 
while so joined, uniting the four parts of the cast they supported, the 
angles of the reproduction became as accurate as those of the original. 
Any other method would have required numerous measurements and 
much care in using them. Uniting the casts as we did necessitated, merelv, 
uniform setting of the plaster on the four glue molds and a reasonable 
amount of speed in joining the casts. Even with our alum solution, the 
heat of the setting plaster soon melted the glue molds. 

Each morning, as soon as the cast had been completed, attention was 
directed to preparations for the mold that was to follow. The forms were 
lowered from the next section on the monument and the stone prepared 
as indicated in preceding paragraphs. The glue molds just used were 
cut into small pieces and spread for drying; the forms were destroyed and 
carted into the jungle. It is interesting to note that melted glue', left in 
pails or tubs, would neither cool nor solidify but deteriorated within a few 
hours. .Also, if the drying fragments of the discarded glue mold were 
carelessly spread and a free circulation of air prevented, they invariably 
sweated and soured, rendering them unfit for further use. 

Our part}' entered the field with no experience and but little knowledge 
of the use of glue molds. During such preliminary experiments as we 
could conduct while awaiting the arrival of our materials, we learned that, 
in the tropics, glue or gelatin molds required more careful preparation than 
in the States. Our first pourings were too thin and resulted in soft, rather 



96 The Architect and Engineer 

sticky molds. It was soon apparent that a mere dampening of the dry glue 
flakes gave a thicker, heavier pouring and a more satisfactory^ mold than 
was possible with well-soaked gelatin. The impossibility of obtaining cool 
water for casting also brought its difficulties — speedy work was our only 
means of overcoming the resulting inconveniences. Another vexing prob- 
lem was met with in the drying shed where minute worms developed a 
habit of exploring the interior of our plaster casts. Denatured alcohol, 
applied to the plaster, seemingly increased their prodigious appetites for 
they continued to honey-comb the casts unless each reproduction was 
frequently exposed to the direct rays of the burning sun. 

The climate was, of course, the greatest handicap under which the 
expedition labored. We reached Quirigua at the beginning of the dry 
season, a ninety-day period during which the rains are more irregular and 
of shorter duration than usual. Temperatures were distinctly tropical, a 
fact that only increased our troubles. Under such conditions, not only the 
nature of our medium but personal comfort as well required a temporary 
shelter over the monument being cast. Accordingly, canvas tarpaulins 
were drawn over poles that reached above the stones, drop curtains being 
utilized when driving rain-storms or the afternoon sun threatened the ex- 
posed parts of the monument. 

During February, March and April, the three months during which 
records are available, the average daily temperature, as observed on the 
shaded veranda of the nearest United Fruit Co. farmhouse, was 66° at 6 
a. m. ; 88° at 12 noon ; and 76° at 6 p. m. In the small, open space where 
our work of reproduction was pursued, the temperature was obviously 
higher and more unbearable. The direct rays of the sun were unmerciful 
and the 150 foot wall of surrounding jungle successfully turned what 
occasional breezes would otherwise have freshened the plaza. A persistent, 
high humidity, added to this heat, was certainly a sufficient test as to the 
practicability of glue molds in the torrid zone. 

For shipment, all casts were packed in wooden crates and protected by 
dried banana leaves. The fact that they survived the rough handling of 
Central American ports and reached New Orleans with very little breakage 
was owing to careful and generous re-enforcement of the casts rather 
than abundant packing. 

Our work was continued over a period of four months, during which 
time casts were made of six colossal monuments. Each of these re- 
productions is an exact duplicate of its original and exhibits not only 
every line and carving of the primitive sculpture but the very texture of 
the stone itself. Compared with the results obtained by other processes, the 
casts from our glue molds are so vastly superior as to beggar description. 
The completed reproductions are now on exhibition at the Panama-California 
Exposition, San Diego. Later they will be removed to the halls of the School 
of American Archaeology at Santa Fe, New Mexico. 



The Bricklayer Again 

A bricklayer lay ill, and the doctor having done what he could, told the 
man's wife to take his temperature in the morning. Calling the next day, 
the doctor asked if his instructions had been followed. 

"Well, we didn't have a 'tremometer' in the house," the good woman 
replied, "but I put a barometer on his chest and it went up to very dry. So 
I gave him a bottle of beer and he's g'one to work." — Chicago Herald. 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 97 

The Architect's Wife: A Study of Difficulties 

(From tlie London Builder) 

THERE are few more difficult roles to play in the drama of life than 
that of an architect's wife, for she must be gifted by nature with a 
dual personality, or else be a consummate actress and one who can 
instantaneously play a part when necessity demands. Being a woman, she 
knows that no man can design a house without making grave mistakes, 
for is not a woman's intuition of more value than any man's knowledge 
where the details of a house are concerned? On the other hand, has she 

not promised to love, honor and ■ her husband — that is, a man whose 

judgment she knows is at fault in matters which only a woman can speak 
authoritatively about? The result is that there are two warring elements 
at work, neither of which can be consistently satisfied. 

If, as is sometimes the case, her husband's clients are her personal 
friends, she is in a quandary, for she sees the defects of his work, but must 
in loyalty to him conceal her knowledge till she can have a tete-a-tete with 
him. Her eloquence is checked because she cannot give free play to her 
understanding; she is, in fact, in the position of counsel defending a crim- 
inal of whose guilt he is assured, and, being a woman, her sense of justice 
is not satisfied with the consolation that she is but following time-honored 
precedent, which is sufficient for a mere man and husband. The difficulties 
of an architect in his attempt to secure his ends by the means of a number 
of imperfect agencies such as the work of builders and workmen do not as 
a rule appeal to a temperament which is idealistic and thorough to an 
extent that man seldom understands. Ultimate perfection seems to her 
attainable, and any defects which occur through defective oversight or 
want of judgment are dismissed as things which should have been obviated. 
No woman really thinks that to err is human, and, though in large matters 
her forgiveness may be divine, she is often unwilling to exercise it in the 
trivial affairs of life, perhaps thinking by so doing she is throwing pearls 
before swine. Every woman for whom an architect builds finds defects 
in the house which has been completed, and the architect's wife finds her 
natural sympathy with her own sex and her womanly esprit de corps in 
conflict with her position as the wife of the ofifender. If the architect's work 
is of a public charaeter his difficulty largely disappears, for his wife will 
admit that he is more likely to know the requirements of a public building 
than she is ; nor will she be placed in the same personal contact with the 
employers, as is often the case with a house. 

Is there any way to avoid the grave dilemmas which we have indicated 
and to save the architect's wife from the difficulties which we have briefly 
described? The most ideal plan is, as it usually is in life, the least prac- 
ticable one — that the architect should keep his profession a secret from his 
wife. If he could get through life described as being "something in the 
City" the difficulty would vanish, but in most cases this would be imprac- 
ticable, and the architect has to stand in the dock from the outset. Or if, 
on the other hand, all his work lies at a distance from his dwelling place, 
and his clients are unknown to his wife, he will be able to conceal his 
defects from sight ; but this, again, is not always practicable. In the third 
case, he may try to obtain some of the advantages of collective action by 
securing his wife's criticism of and acquiescence in his designs before they 
are executed ; but this method has the disadvantage that the architect's 
wife is burdened with the responsibilities of her husband's business as well 
as her own affairs. 



98 The Architect and Engineer 

\\"e have but shortly explained some of the difficulties of a position which we 
have often felt sympathy with, and there seem to be only two solutions, namely, 
that if a man elect to follow architecture as a calling he should not marry, 
or, if he looks forward to marriage, he should not elect to be an architect, 
as if he does both he places the lady of his choice in a position the difficulties 
of which are exceptional. But women are nothing if not self-sacrificing 
and heroic, and, difficult as the position is, many acquit themselves as only 
women can, and it certainly is true that no woman is so worthy of canoniza- 
tion as she who adecjuately fills the difficult role of the architect's wife, for 
she can be classed with the camel who passes through the eye of a needle 
or the Chancellor of the Exchequer who produces a Budget which pleases 
every class of the community, convincing them that it is more blessed to 
give than to receive. 

Height Limit of Concrete Buildings 

A WRITER in St. Nicholas, a famous old juvenile monthly, recently used 
some interesting illustrations in telling young America about the possi- 
bilities of reinforced concrete as applied to skyscrapers. His story is 
as follows : 

"Aren't you ever going to reach the height limit of these tall buildings? 
asked one of the boys. I should think they would soon be too heavy for 
their foundations." 

"Not at all: not at all," said Mr. Hotchkiss, looking around tor an illus- 
tration. Then he fumbled in his pockets and pulled out a small bolt. Un- 
screwing the nut, he measured it, and found that it was a scant inch square. 

Then he placed the nut on the ground and stood on it. "There, now I 
am subjecting the ground to a greater strain than is this whole building." 

We looked at him incredulously. "Yes, I weigh 210 pounds. Two 
hundred and ten pounds on one square inch makes how much per square 
foot? Reckon it up." 

I-"ifteen tons per square foot was the outcome of the figuring. 

"That's it. The building regulations of this city do not allow a weight 
of more than fifteen tons per square foot on the foundations. A foolish 
regulation, in my estimation, because of the idea that concrete would crush 
under a heavier load than that ; but the kind of concrete we have nowadays, 
thoroughly reinforced with steel, will stand a far greater pressure. You can 
see for yourselves how- ridiculously light the load is when you figure it 
down to square inches, ^^'hy, many a fat woman who picks her w-ay across 
a muddy street on her French heels, exceeds the limit of the building code 
for pressure on the earth." 

"But I can't believe," protested one of the boys, "that a big building 
like this puts a strain of only 210 pounds on the ground. Do you mean to 
say that if you cut a sliver out of this wall from top to bottom and only 
an inch thick by one inch wide it would not weigh more than 210 pounds?" 

"Well, not e.xactly that. If your sliver were cut out of one of the steel 
columns, it would weigh six or seven times as much as that, and if it were 
cut out of the elevator shaft, it would be as light as air. You must remem- 
ber that very little of this building is solid all the way up. At the bottom 
of the columns there is a footpiece that spreads the weight over a large 
area of concrete. There are 69 concrete piers under this building. It is 
a regular centipede, with concrete legs all over that stand on rock 120 feet 
below the sidewalk. Some of those legs are twenty feet in diameter. You 
will find that there are quite a few square inches in the foundation supports 
of this building. 



The Architect and Eu^i^iiiccr 99 

"Altogether the finished structure is going to weigh something like 
100,000 tons, with an allowance of 20,000 more for wind-pressure. This 
isn't ver_v much when a'ou consider the size of the building. If you could 
throw the finished building into the ocean, it would float, provided the doors 
and windows did not leak, and what is more, fully five-sixths of the build- 
ing would project out of the water. 

"Oh, we haven't reached the height limit by any means. Somebody 
has figured out just how tall a building could be erected on a point 200 feet 
square without violating the building code. He estimated that the building 
would be 150 stories high, reaching 2,000 feet in the air: and it would weigh 
516,500 tons. It could cost $60,000,000, and it would be required to stand 
a wind pressure of 6,000 tons. As a matter of fact, it would take something 
like 50,000 tons of wind pressure to upset the structure. 

"Of course, a building like this would not stand on concrete legs, but 
would have a single solid foundation pier 200 feet square, running down to 
bed-rock. If the steel work could be erected directly on the rock without 
anv concrete between, no doubt permission could be obtained to add a few 
more stories on top." 

Prospects for Contractors 

WHENEVER normal conditions are upset by a disturbance of some kind 
resulting in financial and business depression, contractors are among 
the first to suft'er and, very likely, among the last to feel the effects 
of the recovery. 

It is at such times that contractors must depend on municipal improvements 
for work to keep them busy. 

Immediately upon the assumption of hostilities in Europe, business and 
commitments were curtailed to an unusual extent and new contract work which 
for several months previously had been very dull, was further restricted. 
Therefore contractors were feeling particularly discouraged. 

This being the outlook, an investigation made by Engineering and Con- 
tracting should be especially encouraging to contractors. That publication in- 
quired from a number of city officials as to the prospects for municipal 
improvements in the year to come. From one hundred and fifty cities whose 
mayors answered the inquiry relative to possible curtailment of city improve- 
ments, the following results were reported : 

3% are expecting that construction work will be decreased, but solely because of 

local conditions. 
19% are having or expect to have difficulty in disposing of improvement bonds. 
63% think that European conditions will have no effect upon municipal work. 

5% have already financed all work proposed for the coming year. 
10%' expect to do even more work than usual. 

Taken only at their face value these figures are highly encouraging. We 
believe that a premium may safeh' be placed on their face value. 

There are very good reasons whv the average city should put forth extra 
eflforts at this time to finance the construction of public works. The reasons 
are: 

1. Favorable market for city bonds. 

2. Competition among the best class of contractors. 

3. Cheaper materials. 

As regards the sale of city bonds, investors always turn to them as one of 
the safest forms of investment whenever business is upset, and they are doing 
so much more now that the stock exchanges of the world are closed. The 
stimulation in investments during October and November will be even more 



100 The Architect and Engineer 

pronounced because of those conditions, and municipalities should take full 
advantage of the time before the usual December interruption. 

There is a financial stringency in business because banks have generally 
restricted credits, but this stringency does not afTect the investing public very 
materially. The eagerness with which people have subscribed for the recent 
issue of the New York City bonds, and similar issues in a score of other cities 
indicates clearly that there is a good market for this class of securities. 

The best and cheapest work is obtained when it results from keen competi- 
tion among the best class of contractors. Never before have we seen so many 
of the best firms in the country compete for public construction work which, 
heretofore, was quite outside of their line of work. As an instance of this may 
be recorded the three million dollar sewer contract recently awarded by the 
City of St. Louis to one of the largest railroad contractors in the country. 
Owing to their superior resources firms of this kind are able to undertake very 
large municipal contracts, and since much of the work is sub-let the smaller 
contractors also benefit. 

By taking advantage of this favorable combination of conditions, munici- 
palities will not only get their work done better and for less money than other- 
wise, but they will also help immensely to restore individual confidence because 
of their unabated vigor in prosecuting their normal activities. 

In this connection, the newspapers have a duty to fulfill. In the rush to 
publish more or less authentic war news, their columns have been so filled 
therewith that domestic matters of greater relative importance have received 
scant or no consideration. 

* * 

Panama-Pacific Exposition Notes 

A panoramic reproduction of the Grand Canyon of Arizona has been 
built at a cost of over $300,000; over fifty thousand square yards of linen 
canvas, imported from Scotland, were being used for set pieces. Visitors 
in this concession will view the panoramas from observation parlor cars, 
moved by electricity on an elevated trestle, seemingly along the rim of the 
canyon. 

^ •¥ -^ ^ 

So comprehensive is the display of paintings and statuary embraced in 
the international loan collection at the Exposition that many annual art 
exhibits are to give way to the exposition. The Carnegie Institute of Pitts- 
burg has notified the exposition that it will not hold a 1915 exhibit and this 
will be the first time in eighteen years that there has been no annual display. 

* * * * 

One of the features of the Washington building at the Panama-Pacific 
International Exposition is Ezra Meeker and his team> of oxen. Meeker, 
white of hair and beard, drove his team from the State of Washington to the 
exposition. A few years ago he drove them over the trail from Seattle to 
Washington, D. C. 

* * * * 

Henry Ford, automobile manufacturer, shows in the Palace of Education 
and Social Economy of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition the 
detailed workings of the social service innovation made in his factories. The 
details of his division of 3,000 acres into 15-acre tracts for workers also are 
shown. 

* * * * 

All but one of the great main exhibit palaces were completed five months 
before the exposition opening day — February 20, 1915. 



The Architect and Engineer 101 

For the first time in the history of China that nation will have machin- 
ery exhibits at a world exposition. China has 2,000 square feet in the 
Palace of Machinery, the largest of the exposition structures. 

* * * * 

The tallest flagpole ever erected, a 232-foot stick of Oregon pine, stands 
in front of the Oregon building. The flag pole was contributed by the citizens 
of Astoria, Oregon. 

Six hundred square feet of exhibit space have been alloted to Christian 
Science in the Palace of Education and Social Economy at the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition. The exhibit includes a display of the many 

Christian Science publications. 

* * iji * 

One of the strangest sights in the world is to be seen in the "Yellow- 
stone Park," a great concession on "The Zone" at the Panama-Pacific 
International Exposition. The concession covers more than four acres and 
is surrounded by cliffs rising more than 100 feet, the whole being painted 
to nature's colors and covered with shrubs, plants and moss to complete 
the illusion of naturalness. An exact duplication of Old Faithful Inn 
stands at one side of the concession, while in its center is the largest 
topographical map ever made, reproducing ever}^ feature of the Yellow- 
stone Park and 220 feet across. Geysers, a waterfall 85 feet in height, and 
many superb spectacles are features of the display. 



Paint Protects Property 

Many a man is punctual about protecting his property from loss by fire, 
but fails to protect it against the weather, such as the sun, the wind and mois- 
ture. He can appreciate the destruction which comes from fire, but he is 
totally blind to the slower destruction which takes place day by day and month 
by month, from cliinatic conditions. 

The loss by fire is a possibility of, say one in a thousand, but he protects 
himself against this. The certainty of deterioration from rot and rust, shrinkage 
and warping is ever present and can only be guarded against by being properly 
painted. 

In placing fire insurance the premium paid is absolutely gone and the 
owner has only the sense of protection. By properly caring for his property 
in other ways, however, such as painting, repairs, etc., he sees the worth of 
his money in the improved appearance of the building, the certainty that it 
will last longer and give him the satisfaction of the better building. Fire 
insurance is merely insurance against sudden loss, while paint and repair 
insurance prevents the loss in the first place and increases the market value 
at the same time. 

The cost of painting and keeping up the appearances and good condition of 
the building may run a trifle more than the fire insurance, but it is money well 
si>ent. 

One well-known Western Canada firm issues an advertisement regarding 
paint increasing the value of property, in a very forcible manner by showing 
an unpainted building, looking in a very dilapidated condition, its market value 
being about $3,000. After receiving a coat of paint the same property looks 
transformed by its beautiful appearance, and now would easily bring an 
additional $1,000 to its owner, while at the same time ensuring him* a building 
which would outlive the weather conditions by many more years than would the 
unpainted building. 



102 



The Architect and Engineer 




BERTHOLD MONUMENT, MONTEREY, CALIFOKNI.-l 
Willis Polk & Co., Designers 

The Berthold Monument and Pool at Monterey, 
California 

THIS beautiful monolith was designed by Willis Polk and Company, 
the San Francisco architects, and was constructed by the Schoenfeld 
Marble Company, under direction of the well-known artist, Francis 
McComas. Built of Indiana limestone, it stands in front of the first city 
hall in California, a building still in use, a monument to the public spirited- 
ness of a humble townsman, George Berthold, who died in comfortable 
circumstances and bequeathed sufficient funds to build this notable 
structure. Daniel O'Connor's beautiful verses, which are graven on the 
stone, are here reproduced : 



MONTEREY 

In the mantle of old tradition. 
In the rime of a vanished day 
The shrouded and silent city 
Sits by her crescent bay. 



The Architect and Engineer 103 

The ruined fort on the hill-top, 
Where never a bunting streams, 
Looks down on cannonless fortress, 
On the solemn city of dreams. 

Gardens and wonderful roses 
Climbing o'er roof and wall; 
Woodbine and crimson geraniums, 
Hollyhocks, purple and tall. 

Mingle their odorless breathings 
With the crisp, salt breezes from the sands 
Where pebbles and sounding sea shells 
Are gathered by children's hands. 

Women with olive faces 
And the liquid southern eye, 
Dark as the forest berries 
That grace the woods in July, 

Tenderly train the roses. 
Gathering here and there 
A bud — the richest and rarest — 
For a place in their long, dark hair. 

Fee'ble and garrulous old men 

Tell, in the Spanish tongue. 

Of the good, grand times at the Mission, 

And the hymns that the Fathers sung. 

Of the oil and the wine and the plenty. 
And the dance in the twilight gray— 
"Ah! these," and the head shakes sadly, 
"Were good times in Monterey." 

Behind in the march of cities, 
The last in the eager stride 
Of villages born the latest. 
She dreams by the ocean side. 

DANIEL O'CONNOR. 

* * 

Exposition to Honor Architects 

For the purpose of affording the exposition directorate an opportunity 
to express its appreciation to the men who designed and executed the expo- 
.sition, arrangements are being made to hold a special day in their honor. 
The department of special events has the programme under way, but as yet 
nothing definite is ready for announcement either as to the date or the 
events on that day. It is planned to honor both the architects, artists and 
others who have had a part in designing the exposition. 



Opportunity to Study Architecture 

The Department of Architecture of the Universit}' of CaHfornia an- 
nounces that a class in drafting has been opened in the Underwood build- 
ing, San Francisco, for the convenience of those wishing instruction in 
architecture and who cannot take up the regular course at the University. 
A similar class is also planned for Oakland. 



Lincoln Beachey, the well-known aviator, is to build a home in Forest Hill, 
San Francisco, to cost $8 500. The architects are Larsen & Coleman. — .Architect 
& Engitieer. 

Here's hoping the aviator owner won't have the architects "up in the air" 
before the job's completed. — Improvement Bulletin. 



104 



The Architect and Engineer 



THE 

Arrljfttprt anb iEngtnppr 

OP CAUIFORINIA 

Published Monthly in the interests of the 
Architects. Structural Engineers, Contract- 
ors and the Allied Trades of the Pacific 
Coast by the Architect and Engineer Co. 

Business Office and Editorial Rooms 

617-619 Monadnock Building. San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 1828 

SUBSCRIPTION 
parts o( the United States $1.50 
3 Canada 50c additional ; to all Foreign points 



Vol. XL. February, 1915 



' Brick. 



Terra 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Wm. B. Gester, ■ - ■ j Inspection 
LoREN E. Hunt, C. E. - 1 and Tests 

F. wi^mzPATRlCK: i F,reProofConstrucUon 
W. \V. Brkite. C. E. - Structural Steel 

.^THOL McBfAN 

W. E. Dennison 
Howard Frost, \ 

G, B. ASHCRDFT, c. E 
H. M. T.OWENTHAL 

J. R. D. Mackenzie ■ 

Fred M, Woods, Jr.. 

Wilbur David Cook, LandscapeArchitectu 

T, C. KiERULFF - ■ ■ Legal Points 

Paul C. Butte Electrical Construction 

Louis F. Mauer - - Waterproofine 



ARCHITECTURAL 



Artificial Stone 

I Roofs and Roofing 

Rock and Gravel 



Fred H, Meyer 
August G. Headman 
Edward T. Foulkes 
Alfred F. Rosenheim 
G. .Albert Lansburgh 
Houghton Sawyer 
Herman Barth 
Arthur Brown, Jr, 
Chas. P. Weeks 
Octavius Mortjan 
J. C. Austin 
Jas. W. Plachek 
W. H.Ratcliff. Jr. 



William O. Raiguel 
F. D. Hudson 
Sumner P. Hunt 
Norman F. Marsh 
Smitt) O'Brien 
Almcric Coxhead 
Harrison .Albright 
John Parkinson 
A. W.Smith 
T. Patterson Ross 
William H. Weeks 
Chas. W Dickey 
Henry C. Smith 



CONTRIBUTORS 



Wm. A. Newman 
Jas. W.Reid 
Ernest Coxhead 
Wm. C. Hayes 
Chas. Henry Cher 
Herbert E. Law 
Hon. Jas. D, Phelan 
John Galen Howar. 
Louis C. Mullgardt 



ey 



John Bakewell.Jr. 
W. Garden Mitchell 
Nathaniel Blaisdell 
W. R. B. Wilcox 
William Mooser 
Robert Morgeneier 
B. J. S. Cahill 
F. A. I. A. 



E. M. C. Whitney 
.A. I. Whitney 
Frederick W. Jones 



Manager 

Treasurer 

Managing Editor 



This is the time to build. Depres- 
sions that have prevailed for the 
past six months have 
TO Riiii I brought building condi- 
10 BUILD ^JQ^^ jQ ^ gjjjjg j.,^Qgj favor- 
able to the investor. Probably there 
will not again occur such opportuni- 
ties in the active years of men now liv- 
ing. Just get busy as quick as you 
can so as to make the most of the 
situation. Nothing is more certain 
than that the recent business and 
industrial lethargy will be followed 
by a great rush of enterprise and 
progress. Those who begin early 
get the picking of the ripest grapes. 



There appears to be a well di- 
rected movement looking to the 
licensing of engi- 
LICENSINQ ENQI- neers b y State 
NEERS AS WELL author ization, 
AS ARCHITECTS along some such 
lines now prevail- 
ing in California and other States 
for licensing architects. 

In Pennsylvania a commission has 
been appointed by the Governor, 
and in New York enactments look- 
ing to the licensing of engineers 
have been drafted and introduced 
in the Legislature. 

Those who are opposed to the 
registration of engineers hold that 
bv such means the public would se- 
cure no additional protection against 
the professionally inefficient. They 
cite the legal and medical profes- 
sions as providing thousands of 
"fakes" who manage to pass the re- 
quired test. 

Personally, we hold some sym- 
pathy with this view, for we are 
thoroughly persuaded that in gen- 
eral the civil engineer is a more 
wholesome man — and a better man 
professionally, physically and moral- 
Iv — than either the lawyer or the 
doctor. But the fact remains that 
the legal and medical professions en- 
joy a higher professional status. 
WHtv is this? Does not registration 
provide at least a part of the reason? 

It is adduced in all seriousness 
that one of the most aggravating 
difficulties in the way of enforcing 
a licensing bill is to determine the 



The Architect and Engineer 



105 



character of the examination. Con- 
cerning such examination, the Engi- 
neering Record says in a recent 
editorial : 

It must necessarily be sufficiently elemen- 
tary to allow comparative newcomers in the 
profession to pass, yet such an examination 
is not a criterion as to the ability of a man 
to design a large structure, in which the 
hazard to life and property is much greater 
than any work that would be entrusted to 
a man who could barely pass the stated 
exainination. 

One might advance the same argu- 
ment in regard to surgery. A "com- 
parative newcomer" might know 
how to perform such a "simple" 
operation as lopping ofT a limb. Such 
knowledge might go a considerable 
way in passing him into his profes- 
sion. And why not? The rest will 
depend upon the experience and rep- 
utation that he may bring" to bear 
later. Only if he acquires name and 
fame will he be entrusted with those 
intricate, delicate touches of the sur- 
geon's knife which hold the secrets 
of life and death. It is not to say 
that because he never attains to the 
highest proficiency in his profession 
that he is unqualified to render ex- 
cellent service in it. 

Is it not reasonable to apply the 
essence of this argument to engi- 
neering? Is it possible that the re- 
quirements would have to be so ele- 
mentary that they would not act as 
an efifective bar to admitting to the 
profession men incapable of observ- 
ing those fundamentals of their work 
which, after all, reduce to a mini- 
mum the "hazard of life and prop- 
ertv?" 



A Criticism of the "Modem Style of 
Architecture." 

N. Serracino, a New York architect, with 
offices in the Johnston building in that city, 
has recently returned from a five months' 
trip through England, France, Switzerland 
and Italy, during which period he made 
exhaustive studies, from an architect's 
point of view, of the public buildings in 
the leading cities of those countries. It is 
gratifying to note that Mr. Serracino con- 
siders America far in advance of Europe 
with reference to heating, ventilation 
and sanitary requirements. 

Mr. Serracino has lived in New York 
City for the past eleven years, being a grad- 
uate of the Royal University of Naples. In 



1911 his drawings of the Eglise St. Jean 
Baptiste were exhibited at the International 
Exhibition held in Turin, earning for him 
a gold medal. This church, recently erected 
on the southeast corner of Lexington ave- 
nue and 76th street, New York City, when 
completed will have cost nearly a half mil- 
lion of dollars. 

Mr, Serracino's observations and conclu- 
sions are in part as follows ; 

When I left New York for Liverpool and Lon- 
don I anticipated that the buildings in these cities 
would be of Gothic design, but found that, with the 
exception of the Houses of Parliament in London, 
all the public edifices were in the Greek and 
Roman style. 

When I got into France, Switzerland and Italy 
I noticed tliat most of the buildings in course of 
erection were designed after what is coming to be 
called the Modern style. Hotels, residences, the- 
aters; in fact, all kinds of buildings, even chapels 
and mausoleums, are so built. Some architects 
call it the Floral, others the Liberty and still 
others the Art Nouveau style. These names, in 
my opinion, are not exactly correct. I thinlc it 
might more legitimately be termed the Modern 
style. 

This Modern style varies from all others in that 
it IS unhampered by the rules, traditions and 
proportions of the classic orders. The art of 
decoration is based more on imitation of natural 
flowers and plants, transforming them to suit 
decorative purposes. In France, Switzerland and 
Italy it seems that this Modern style is being 
generally used and it appears that a large part of 
the public is beginning to like it. This Modern 
architectural decoration is inspired by simplicity, 
limiting the ornamentation and is free from all 
tradition and the rules of everthing that was done 
before. Flowers and plants are imitated and in 
some buildings policrome effects are produced. 

While these are the ideas of the Modern style, 
we highly condemn the so-called futurists, who 
in art are like anarchists, in that they would 
destroy the artistic heritage of the past and attempt 
to create something entirely new, which would 
be a difficult task for the greatest of architects. 

This Modern style is highly commendable in 
some instances, but it is being used to excess and 
a great many architects are employing for orna- 
mentation flowers and plants which have been 
transformed to such an extent that in many 
cases the style has been made to appear ridiculous. 
Eccentricity has been given too much latitude. 

Most of the buildings in Europe are now being 
built with reinforced concrete, using stucco on 
the outside with different finishes. iLven natural 
stones are imitated in a surprising manner by 
using the cement and finishing the surface with 
powder of the real stone they are imitating. There 
are many fine examples of this in Switzerland 
and in Northern Italy. 

I have seen beautiful examples of the Modern 
style in residences and theaters and liked them 
very much. I have seen other buildings where 
there was too much ornamentation and eccentric- 
ity, and in such cases this Modern style did not 
appeal to me at all. 

I should not like to see this style employed for 
public buildings, or for that matter, buildings of any 
serious nature. In Rome I noticed several examples 
of this architecture and I wish to criticise strongly 
the extension to the Montecitorio building now 
being used as the House of Parliament. This 
old building was begun by the great architect, 
Lorenzo Bernini, in 1650 and completed by C. 
Fontana. It is a beautiful specimen of the good 
period of the Borocco style. The new extension, 
however, is being erected in the Modern style, 
flowers, fruits, and plants being used for orna- 
mentation. The new addition as it is being built, 
would look very well if it were going to be used 
as an apartment house or hotel, but it is by no 
means suitable for a House of Parliament, partic- 
ularly as an extension to the work of Bernini, 
who was an architectural genius. In my opinion 
it should have been compulsory that the same 
style be employed for any addition to such a 
building. The Bernini facade will be left unal- 



With the Architects and 
Engineers 



M. D. 
delphi 



Antpriran Sastxivds of Arrlfttrrta 

(ORGANIZED 1857) 

OFFICERS FOR 1914-IS 

President R. Clipston Stuegis, Boston 

First Vice-President Thos. R. Kimball, 

Omaha, Neb. 

Second Vice-President. D. Knickerbocker Boyd. 

Philadelphia 

Secretary Burton L. Fenner, New York 

Treasurer J. L. Maur\n, St. Louis 

I T. J D. Fuller. Washington, D. C. 
Auditors...; rqbert Stead, Washington, D. C. 

Board of Directors 

One Year — Irving K. Pond. Chicago; John 
)naldson, Detroit; Edward A. Crane, Phila- 

For Two Years— C. Grant La Farge, New 
York; Burt L. Fenner, New York; H. Van Buren 
Magonigle, New York. 

For Three Years— W. R. B. Willcox, Seattle, 
Wash.; Octavius Morgan, Los Angeles; Walter 
Cook, New York. 

San Francisco Chapter 

President W. B. Faville 

Vice-President Edgar A. Mathews 

SECRETARV-TREASLUhK SVLVMN SCHNA ITTACHER 

„ ) Henry A. Schulze 

Trustees j j^g w reid 

Southern California Chapter 

President Albert C. Martin 

Vice-President S. Tilden Norton 

Secretary Fernand Parmentier 

Treasurer August Wackerbarth 

Board of Directors 

J. E. Allison J. J- Blick 

J. J. Backus 



Portland, Ore., Chapter 

President A. E. Doyle 

Vice-President Folger Johnson 

Secretary Wm. G. Holford 

Treasurer J. A. Fouilihoux 

^ ,, \ Jos. Jaccoberger 

Council Members j j, j^-' n^^^more 

Washington State Chapter 

President Tas. H. Schack, Seattle 

Vice-President '. Jos. Cote. Seattle 

Vice-President Geo. Gove, Tacoma 

Vice-President L. L. Rand, Spokane 

Secretary Arthur L. Loveless, Seattle 

Treasurer Andrew Willatzen, Seattle 

( D. R. Huntington 
Members of Council -^ W. R. B. Willcox 

I Jas. Stephen 



(KalifDrnia &tatf Inarii nf ArrljttPrturf 

NORTHESXr DISTRICT. 

President John Bakewell, Jr. 

Secretary and Treasurer. Sylvain Schnaittacher 

J NO. Bakewell, Jr. Edgar A. Mathews 

Joseph C. Newsome 

SOTTTHEBN DISTRICT. 

President John P. Krempel 

Secretary-Treasurer Fred H. Roehrig 

I Octavius Morgan 

Members ■{ Sumner P. Hunt 

I Wh. S. Hebbard 

i^an 3franriHrn Artljttprtural (Hlvtb 

OFFICERS FOR I9I3-I4 

President Geo. E. Greenwood 

Vice-President Chas. Peter Weeks 

Secretary A. L. Williams 

Treasurer Wm. D. Sherman 

Directors 
Henry A. Thomsen James A. Magee 

ffina AngpIpB Arrl^ttrrtural QJlub 

President Arthur Rolland Kelly 

Vice-President Harry F. Withey 

Secretary-Treasurer Henry E. Bean 

Chairman Educational Committee 

John T. Vawter 

Chairman House and Entertainment Committees, 

Mossier of Atelier 

Gilbert Stanley Underwood 



Sian ItrgD Arrljitrrtural AHBDriattnn 

President J. B. Lyman 

Vice-President F. C. Cressv 

Secretary Robt. Halley, Jr. 

Treasurer G. A. Haussen 

Arrljttprtural Slragur a f H|r PacifirdoaBt 

President.. Charles Peter Weeks, San Francisco 

Vice-Pres. . . .John Bakewell, Jr., San Francisco 

Sec'y-Treas. . . . Aug. G. Headman, San Francisco 

Next Convention City — San Francisco. 



tered, but the rear and a portion of the side 
elevations will be in the Modern style. 

While in Rome. I visited the .\merican .\cademy 
of Fine .^rts. which is situated on the Janiculum 
Hill, one of the beautiful spots of Rome. The 
director. Mr. Jesse Benedict Carter, kindly showed 
me the old and new buildings and also took me 
through the gardens. The new building is beauti- 
ful and simple in design; the outside is dignified 
and correct and the inside very comfortable and 
sanitary. 

Another thing to which my attention was called 
was that while all the important buildings in 
Europe, old and new. are carefully decorated on 
the outside and inside, it appears that to a greater 
or less degree the heating and ventilating systems 
and the sanitary requirements are deficient. In 
this respect America is far in advance of any 
of the cities I visited in Europe. 




of Hrctitectg 

Regular Meetings Second 
Wednesday of Each Month 



John Bakewell, Jr. 

Charles Peter Weeks 

William Otis Raiguel 

John Galen Howard and Louis C. Mullgardt 



President - 
Vice-President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Directors 
Committees: — 

Membership — Wm. C. Hays, Fbed'k H. Meyer, and Geo. W. Kelham. 

Architectural Practice — John Galen Howard, Clarence R. Ward, and Houghton Sawyer. 

Entertainment and Program — Louis C. Mullgardt, Chas. P. Weeks, and Louis P. Hobart, 

Allied Arts — Loring P. Rixford, J. Harry Blohme, and Warren C. Perry. 

Publicity — Wm. Otis Raiguel, John J. Donovan, and E. Coxhead. 

Education — Bernard R. Maybeck, Arthur Brown. Jr., and John Baur. 

Competitions — Chas. P. Weeks, Wm. C. Hays, and John Reid, Jr. 



January Meeting of San Francisco 
Society of Architects 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
San Francisco Society of Architects was 
held at the University Club, California 
and Powell streets, on the evening of 
January 13th, 1915. 

A short time was devoted to the dis- 
cussion of the "Development of the Foot 
of Market Street" and it was decided to 
make this the subject of deliberation at 
the next meeting at which Mr. O'Shaugh- 
nessy, the City Engineer, has accepted 
an invitation to be present and assist in 
the discussion. 

Mr. Mullgardt read a report submit- 
ted to the Governor by the Advisory 
Committee which was appointed by the 
last Legislature to prepare a bill creating 
a State .A.rt Commission. The bill has 
been introduced by Senator E. S. Birdsall 
and has been referred to the Finance 
Committee of the Senate, of which Sen- 
ator Strobridge is chairman. It is hoped 
that the members of the Society and all 
those interested in the Fine Arts will 
use their influence to bring about the en- 
actment of this bill. 

The guest of the evening, Monsieur 
Henri Guillaume, the architect represent- 
ing the French government in the con- 
struction of the French building at the 
Exposition, made a few remarks. 



$20,000 Residence 

Architects Garden & Kuhn, have mov- 
ed from the fifth to the eleventh floor 
of the Phelan Building, San Francisco. 
Plans are being prepared by this firm for 
a handsome $20,000 residence to be 
erected in Oakland. 



Competition for Hospital Wing 

A competition for tjje selection of an 
architect to prepare plans for the south- 
east wing of the San Francisco Hospital 
has been ordered by the Board of Works 
on the recommendation of the city's con- 
sulting architects, John Galen l4oward, 
Frederick H. Meyer and John Reid, Jr., 
who have laid out the programme of the 
competition. 

The cost of the building is estimated 
at $400,000, and the architect's fee will 
be $24,000. For the expense of the jury 
by whom the prize design will be chosen, 
$3000 will be set aside. The Board of 
Works will appoint two of the jurors, 
one of whom is to be an architect, not 
residing in California, and the other a 
physician or other hospital expert. These 
two will choose the third juror. The 
award is to be made by April 15th. 

The competition has been limited by the 
consulting architects to the following; 
Bakewell & Browne, Herman Barth, 
John Baur, L. B. Dutton. W. C. Hays, 
August Headman, L. P. Hobart, G. W. 
Kelham, Krafft & Sons, H. H. Meyers, 
B. R. Maybeck, L. C. Mullgardt, William 
Newman, Perseo Righetti, Houghton 
Sawyer, Ward & Blohme and C. P. 
Weeks. 

Citrus Experiment Station 

Architect Lester H. Hibbard, 722 
Marsh-Strong Building, Los Angeles, has 
been commissioned to prepare plans for 
the new citrus experiment station to be 
erected at Riverside for the University 
of California on the site recently selected 
by the Board of Regents. About $125,- 
000 will be expended upon the buildings. 



108 



The Architect and Engineer 



Honor for New Orleans Architects 

The architecture and building fra- 
ternity has been given liberal representa- 
tion on the Board of Directors of the 
New Orleans Association of Commerce, 
a commercial organization that is devel- 
oping a new economic era in New 
Orleans and Louisiana. Two of the lead- 
ing architects of that city, Allison Owen 
of Diboll & Owen, and Charles A. Favrot 
of Favrot & Livaudais. were recently 
elected members of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the New Orleans organization, 
and Ernest Lee Jahncke of the Jahncke 
Navigation Company, building materials, 
has been elected vice-president. 



To Repeal Obnoxious Law 

State Senator Herbert C. Jones of San 
Jose is the author of a bill now before 
the California Legislators, repealing the 
old law of 1872, which, under recent de- 
cisions, has been interpreted as requiring 
all plans in competition to be submitted 
in detail and also prohibiting public 
boards from selecting plans except by 
competition. 

By the abolition of this act, public 
boards will have the same freedom of 
choice that individuals now have and 
architects will be able to use as pre- 
liminaries, ordinary sketch plans, instead 
of plans in detail. 



Nice Commission for Mr. Meyer 

Architect Frederick H. Meyer, Bank- 
ers Investment Building, San Francisco, 
has been commissioned to prepare plans 
for extensive improvements to the Cali- 
stoga Hot Springs property, near Napa, 
California, owned by Dr. Elmer E. Stone, 
291 Geary Street, San Francisco. The 
work to be done includes the erection of 
a large sanitarium or hotel, 30 or 40 
cottages, two bath houses, dancing pavi- 
lion, garage, etc. The two bath houses 
will be built first, one for mud baths 
and the other for sulphur baths. All the 
buildings will be of frame construction. 



Ambulance Construction Commission 

This is the first great war in which 
field motor-ambulances have been ex- 
tensively used. It was inevitable that 
many defects should be found in exist- 
inar types, and in various quarters ex- 
perts began to ask whetTier something 
could not be done to standardize the pat- 
terns and to improve the type. At the 
instance of Mr. Henry S. Wellcome, the 
founder of the Wellcome Bureau of 
Scientific Research, a commission has 
been formed, and the names of members 
show at once that the matter is regarded 
as of first importance by those most in- 
timately connected with the welfare of 
the wounded soldier. 

This commission will first and fore- 
most act as a judging committee for the 



award of prizes of the value of £2000 pro- 
vided by the Wellcome Bureau of Scien- 
tific Research. These prizes are ofifered 
for the best designs of an ambulance- 
body which shall fit a standard pattern 
motor-chassis for field motor-ambulances. 
The last day for the receipt of competing 
designs is June 30, 1915. It is hoped that 
the competition will bring in a number 
of ingenious designs, from which the 
ideal field ambulance-body will be 
evolved. 



Plans Approved for Masonic Temple 

Architect A. D. Fellows, of Auburn, 
Placer County, has completed plans and 
same have been approved for a two-story 
Class "C" store and lodge building, to be 
erected in Auburn, for the Masonic Hall 
Association of that city. The enterprise 
has already been fully financed and will 
cost approximately $40,000. The build- 
ing will be of steel and concrete and will 
have a total frontage of 100 feet with a 
depth of 80 feet. There will be stores 
on the ground floor and hall on the 
second floor. H. M. Cooper is president 
of the Building Association. 



New Home for Federal Bank 

It is reported on good authority that 
the United States Federal Reserve Bank 
which is now occupying temporary quar- 
ters in the rear of the Merchants Nation- 
al Bank Building, at Market and New 
Montgomery Streets. San Francisco, is 
negotiating for a building of its own. 
Several architects' names are mentioned 
in connection with the proposed new 
building, among them Edward T. 
Foulkes, and D. C. Coleman. It is said 
that the bank is desirous of having a 
Market street frontage. 



Architects Granted Certificates 

The State Board of Architecture for 
Southern California has issued certifi- 
cates to practice architecture to the fol- 
lowing: 

Francis A. Brown, 239 N. Wilton 
Place; Carl Reger, 532 Laughlin build- 
ing; George M. Lindsay, 453 Holland 
avenue; Walter S. Davis, 621 Exchange 
building, and H. Scott Gerity, 620 Ex- 
change building, all of Los Angeles, and 
Robert R. Curtis, 1435 Grove street. San 
Diego. 



Death Calls John Baur, Sr. 

John Baur, Sr., father of John Baur, 
Jr., a well known San Francisco archi- 
tect, died at the Lane Hospital in San 
Francisco Sunday evening, January 24. 

Mr. Baur came to California in 1862, 
via the Isthmus of Panama. He lived for 
a number of years in San Luis Obispo 
county, and later conducted a jewelry 
store in Petaluma. Six years ago he 
moved to Napa. 



The Architect and Ens,inccr 



109 



A Good Omen for San Francisco 

A local news item states that workmen 
excavating for a new building on Nob 
Hill, San Francisco, uncovered some 
boulders of gold-bearing quartz on the 
exact spot where originally stood the 
beautiful pilaster, now erected at the 
edge of the lake in Golden Gate Park, 
and familiarl}' known as the "Portals of 
the Past." 

San Francisco's wealth was derived 
from gold and silver mining. The Mother 
Lode country, the small persistent veins 
of Xevada county, the old-time placer 
work, and the great Comstock lode of 
Nevada provided the basis of San Fran- 
cisco's wealth. It is still an important 
mining center, but as the founders of 
her great mining fortunes have reached 
the fullness of their lives and have passed 
to the Great Beyond, their descendants 
have become interested in other business 
and her present prestige as a mining city 
is not comparable to her traditions. Es- 
pecially were the wealthy and hospitable 
residents of Xob Hill indebted to mining 
for the great fortunes which enabled 
them to give their city the reputation of 
being "loved around the world." "Por- 
tals of the Past" was built by money 
derived from mining; is it. then, not an 
omen that gold ore should be found to- 
day almost beneath the original site of 
these portals? An omen pointing the 
way to even greater wealth and prosper- 
ity! 



Government Forts to Have Architecture 

In the construction of Fort McArthur 
on the government's reservation of one 
hundred and one acres near San Pedro, 
the board of engineers appointed to de- 
cide upon the location, lay-out and con- 
struction of the various buildings will 
endeavor to have adopted some type of 
architecture in keeping with the natural 
surroundings and an adaptation of the 
Mission stj'le may be chosen as con- 
forming with the traditions of Southern 
California, according to Maj. R. R. Ray- 
mond, resident government engineer and 
a member of the board. The board ex- 
presses the desire to make Fort Mc- 
Arthur a beauty spot, attractive not only 
to tourists but to residents of this lo- 
cality. 

"In the past," says Major Raymond, 
"the War Department has been in the 
habit of building its forts along a certain 
plan of architecture. Whether the fort 
be erected in Alaska or at some beautiful 
point along the coast made no difference, 
and the rough, though substantial, build- 
ings were put up. We will try to have 
this rule set laside when the construction 
of Fort McArthur is begun." 

The fort will be open to visitors after 
completion and will undoubtedly attract 
large numbers of sightseers. 



Carpenters Don't Like Rain 

Considerable interest has been taken in 
the newspaper accounts of the passage of 
a resolution by the district council of the 
Bay Counties Carpenters' Union protest- 
ing against working in the rain on the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition buildings. 
One contractor is said to have supplied 
over 700 carpenters in his employ with 
raincoats, also hot coffee, the latter at 
frequent intervals, so as to complete the 
buildings at the earliest possible moment. 
The resolutions passed by the carpenters' 
district council are reported to be as fol- 
lows: 

That no carpenter employed on the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition shall be compelled to work in 
the rain by any contractor. 

That no carpenter shall be discharged for re- 
fusing to work in the rain. 

That no carpenter shall be compelled to buy a 
raincoat in order that he may work in the rain. 

That no carpenter who does not own a rain- 
coat shall be compelled to put up a deposit for the 
use of a raincoat furnished by the contractor. 



$200,000 Warehouse 

Plans are well along in the office of 
Architect Leo J. I. Devlin of San Fran- 
cisco for a large four-story warehouse of 
mill construction type to be erected on 
Kansas street for John Rapp, at a prob- 
able cost of $200,000. The entire building 
has been leased by Dunham, Hayden & 
Kerrigan, the well-known supply house. 
.•\utomatic sprinklers and steel rolling 
doors and windows will be used. 



San Francisco Man to Build Hotel 

.\rchitect R. C. Ferguson of Los An- 
geles has prepared sketches for a hotel 
building to be built at Honolulu for H. F. 
Lewis of San Francisco. The old Claus 
Spreckels residence which is on the 
grounds, will be remodeled and made a 
part of the hotel. The construction will 
probably be hollow tile and will cost 
about $100,000. 



Contract for Big Apartment House 

.Architect Houghton Sawyer, Shreve 
Building, San Francisco, has let a con- 
tract to Williams Bros, and Henderson 
for the carpentry and mill work on the 
new Stanley Morsehead Apartment 
House, at California and Powell streets, 
San Francisco. A contract for the 
wiring on the same building has been 
let to the General Construction Com- 
pany. 

Reinforced Concrete Warehouse 

.Architect W. J. Dodd, Marsh-Strong 
Building, Los Angeles, has plans for a 
four story reinforced concrete warehouse 
to be erected on Bay street for the H. 
R. Boynton Company, dealer in plumb- 
ing supplies. The engineering work will 
be done by H. E. Bean, 717 Central build- 
ing. Building will cost about $100,000. 



110 



The Architect and Engineer 



Buildings Erected in San Francisco in 
1913-1914 

The San Francisco office of the United 
States Steel Products Company has com- 
piled the following interesting tables, show- 
ing a comparison of the costs, numbers 
and classification of the buildings erected 
in San Francisco in 1913 and 1914: 
1913 

Classification. Number. Amount. 

Class "A" 21 $ 4,037,543.00 

Class "B" 23 1,437,138.00 

Class "C" 235 6,561,936.00 

Frame bldgs. 2131 7,242,271.00 

Alterations 3196 1,758,376.00 



Classification, 


Numbei 


Class "A" 


11 


Class "B" 


7 


Class "C" 


157 


Frame bldgs. 


1920 


Alterations 


3718 


Exposition bldgs. 


82 


Public bldgs. 


12 



Amount. 
384,800.00 
511,900.00 
4,495,038.00 
6,669,723.00 
1.775.362.00 
9.943.577.00 
4.397,163.00 



Total $28,177,563.00 

The public buildings erected during 1913 
are not segregated as in the case of the year 
1914. 

With the Exposition structures, nearly 
all of which should be in the frame classi- 
fication, deducted from the 1914 total 
amount, the building permits would have 
been $18,233,986.00, making a decrease over 
the total of 1914 of $2,803,278.00. 



Big Irrigation Project 

Pierre Zucco has been appointed en- 
gineer for the California Farm & Irri- 
tion Company, with offices in San Fran- 
cisco and lands at Blythe, Riverside 
county, Cal. Mr. Zucco is now prepar- 
ing the plans for an extensive irrigation 
scheme which includes a concrete dam, 
reservoir and power plant. 

Zucco is also consulting engineer for 
the Pacific Gas and Electric Company of 
San Francisco. 



Architect Sawyer Busy 

Architect Houghton Sawyer of San 
Francisco, has prepared plans for a $15,- 
000 reinforced concrete warehouse to be 
erected in Los Angeles for the General 
Chemical Company, whose head offices 
are in San Francisco. Mr. Sawyer also 
has completed plans for extensive alter- 
ations and additions to the country home 
of E. S. Heller at Atherton, San Mateo 
county. 



American Can Company to Build 

It has been announced that the Ameri- 
can Can Company, whose executive 
offices are in the Mills Building, San 
Francisco, will soon commence the con- 
struction of one or more reinforced con- 
crete factory buildings in South San 
Francisco. A desirable site has recently 
been secured in the vicinity of the Union 
Iron Works. 



More About the International Engineer- 
ing Congress, 1915 

The following circular of information 
has been sent out by the Executive Com- 
mittee of the International Engineering 
Congress, with headquarters in the Fox- 
croft Building, San Francisco: 



ntus 



the 



minds of at least certain of the engineers of thii 
country, between the International Electrical Con- 
gress, which it was proposed to hold in San Fran- 
cisco in September. 1915, and the International 
Engineering Congress, which IS TO BE HELD 
during the same month. 

Owing to the unfortunate situation existing 
abroad, and the impossibility of convening the 
International Electrotechnical Commission, under 
whose authorization the Electrical Congress was 
to have been held, it has been decided by the 
governing body of the .-Vmerican Institute of 
Electrical Engineers to indefinitely postpone the 
holding of the Electrical Congress. This does not 
affect the International Engineering Congress, 
which goes ahead as originally planned. 

Marked progress is being made in connection 
with the latter, and papers have already been 
received from several of the foreign countries, 
and everything points to a successful issue. 

The committee of management of the Congress 
wishes to impress upon all engineers of the coun- 
try its earnest desire for the support of the whole 
engineering fraternity, and feels that the volumes 
which will be received by those who subscribe 
to the Congress will be a very adequate return for 
the subscription fee. 



Discount for Cash 

A Wisconsin city is going to run its 
business on a cash basis. It will pay 
cash for everything it buys, and as a cash 
customer it will demand that every per- 
son doing business with it allow it the 
same discount that would be given to 
any private firm. This plan, it is stated, 
is to apply, not only to the purchase 
of supplies, but also to work done under 
contract. Details regarding the last 
mentioned feature art lacking, but it is 
probable that the city purchasing agent 
will take the discounts from the monthly 
estimates. Contractors will be glad to 
know that they will be paid in cash in- 
stead of bonds or warrants, but this 
deduction of. say 2 per cent, from their 
hard-earned money simply because the 
citv meets its obligations promptly is a 
different proposition. It would be mani- 
festly unfair to apply this provision to 
work already imder contract. For future 
work, however, it will not be so bad, for 
the contractor can protect himself by 
making allowance in his bid for the dis- 
counts. 



Mineral Exhibit 

The California State Mining Bureau 
will exhibit at the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition. About four hun- 
dred square feet of floor space in the 
Mines and Metallurgy Building will be 
devoted to case exhibits of California's 
mineral products. Fletcher McN. Hamil- 
ton, State Mineralogist, will detail from 
his staff a competent mining engineer 
whose duty it will be to furnish infor- 
mation to visitors as to the extent and 
value of our mineral resources. 



Review of Recent Books 

of Interest to the 

Architectural and tngineering Professions 

By CHARLES HENRY CHENEY 



COUNTRY' HOUSES. By Aymar Embury II. 

Every designer of country houses will 
want to have in his library this book of 
photographs of Mr. Embury's work. So 
many mixed collections of good, medio- 
cre and bad domestic architecture have 
been offered to us of late that it is a 
great relief to find this volume of 74 
full-page illustrations and plans, each 
showing a small house completely 
studied and in satisfying good taste. 
While !Mr. Embury holds to the best 
traditions of English and Dutch colonial 
architecture, his planning is thoroughly 
up-to-date, and his rare genius for design 
is not cramped or stilted. If somewhat 
freer than the e.xquisitely finished and 
conservative houses of Charles A. Piatt, 
Mr. Embury's work sets an unusually 
high standard for American domestic 
buildings. Surely no cultured man could 
look upon these houses and not say, 
"This is architecture." 

Published by Doubleday, Page & Com- 
pany, New York. $3 net. 



THE PRACTICAL BOOK OF GARDEN ARCHI- 
TECTURE. By Phebe Westcott Humphreys. 

While essentially a book for the client 
rather than the designer, with photo- 
graphs of many sides of Garden .Archi- 
tecture, this volume gives us more vari- 
ety of impression than is usually crowded 
into one small book. Seldom is the word 
"practical" to be found associated with 
such appropriate, artistic selections. 
Restfulness and repose, so generally vio- 
lated in the building of new gardens, are 
characteristic of the designs reproduced. 
The 125 illustrations are from actual 
gardens, showing effective gates and 
gateways, walk paving, terrace walls, 
lakes, pools, garden houses and furni- 
ture, decorated tree houses, arches, bird 
houses, etc. 

Published by J. B. Lippincott Co., Phil- 
adelphia. $5 net. 



EVERYM.^N'S ENCYCLOPAEniA. 

A small, compact reference encyclo- 
paedia in twelve volumes, pocket size, 
which serves convenientlv the need for 
rapid information on affairs of every- 
day life. Brief in statement of essential 
facts it commends itself for that reason 
to the busy man, who will seldom find 
use for any greater list of subjects. It 
has distinct advantage over other encj'- 



clopaedias in the handy size and reason- 
able price at which it is offered. 

Published by E. P. Dutton, New York. 
$8 reinforced cloth; $10 leather; $12 quar- 
ter pigskin. 



GRAPHIC METHODS FOR PRESENTING 
FACTS. By Willard C. Brinton. 

It is vital to the profession to get 
clearly before clients or the public in 
simple, striking form the conclusions on 
any line of investigation, charts or maps. 
Plotted curves and flat architectural 
drawings mean very little to the average 
man, hence this book of Graphic Meth- 
ods for Presenting Facts goes a long 
way in helping the presentation by engi- 
neers of their technical findings in sim- 
ple picture form. While not the last 
word on how to make people see things, 
it goes a long way in the right direction. 

Published by The Engineering Maga- 
zine, New York. 



City planning is making such strides 
on the American continent that it would 
be difficult to keep up with the latest 
practical developments, or with the legal 
problems continually cropping up, were 
it not for such organizations as the Na- 
tional City Planning Conference. This 
book of proceedings is full of serious 
suggestions and well thought out papers 
on the various problems now confront- 
ing practical city planners and all who 
are in any way in touch with such civic 
work. It is a handy reference book for 
progressive architects and engineers. 

Published by the National City Plan- 
ning Conference, 19 Congress street, 
Boston. $2 net. 



BOOKS ON ARCHITECTURE IN BOSTON 
PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

This catalogue furnishes a valuable 
bibliography of architecture and allied 
subiects, which it is at times convenient 
to have. 

Published by the Boston Public Li- 
brary. $2 net. 



A careful and interesting summary of 
housing laws in this country and Can- 
ada, as compared with the model law of 
Lawrence Veiller, It has prime interest 



112 



The Architect and Engineer 



and importance to those working on 
housing codes or for housing betterment. 
Pubhshed by Minneapolis Civic and 
Commerce Association. 75c net. 



Other Books Received 

THE PITTSBURGH SURVEY.— (Review later.) 
Vol. 1— THE PITTSBURGH DISTRICT, Civic 
Conditions. Postpaid, $2.70. 

Vol. 2— WAGE-EARNING PITTSBURGH. Post- 
paid, $1.72. 

Vol. 3— WORK-ACCIDENTS AND THE LAW. 
Postpaid, $1.72. 

Vol. 4— WOMEN AND THE TRADES. Post- 
paid, $1.72. 

Vol. 5— HOMESTEAD: THE HOUSEHOLDS 
OF A MILL TOWN. Postpaid, $1.70. 

Vol. 6— THE STEEL WORKERS. Postpaid, 
$1.73. 

TJIE COMMUTER'S GARDEN. By Kenyon 
Cox. Scribner's. New York. $1.50 net. 
(Review later.) 

THE MINISTRY OF ART. By Ralph Adams 
Cram. Houghton-Mifflin Co., Boston. $1.50 
net. (Review later.) 

A GUIDE TO GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE. By 
T. Francis Bumpus. Dodd-Mead Co. New 
York. $3 net. (Review later.) 

INDIAN BLANKETS AND THEIR MAKERS. 
By George Wharton James. A. C. McClurg 
& Co. Chicago. $4 net. (Review later.) 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE BRITISH IMPERIAL 
HEALTH CONFERENCE (including Hous- 
ing). (Review later.) 

THE EFFECT OF SMOKE ON BUILDING 
MATERIALS AND SOME ENGINEERING 
FACTS ON PITTSBURGH SMOKE PROB- 
LEM. Bulletins 6 and 8. Mellon Inst, of 
Indust. Research. (Review later.) 

THE ART OF THE LOW COLTNTRY. Valcn- 
tiner, Doubleday, Page & Co. $3.50 net. 
(Review later.) 



Sub-Contractors' Claims Ordered Paid 
by Court 

Federal Judge Van Fleet of San Fran- 
cisco recently ordered the claims, aggre- 
gating about $70,000, of several contrac- 
tors who helped to complete the annex 
of the Sacramento Postoffice, paid, in a 
decision rendered against Ambrose B. 
Stannard, the main contractor, and his 
sureties, the Illinois and the National 
Surety Companies. 

Stannard had agreed with the Govern- 
ment authorities to pay all the sub-con- 
tractors who furnished labor and ma- 
terial for the annex. He failed to keep 
his promise and the suit, the trial of 
which was held by Federal Judge Van 
Fleet in Sacramento last April, followed. 
Stannard agreed that the claims of the 
sub-contractors were just, but he urged 
that the suit was prematurely brought 
on the grounds that he had not made a 
final settlement with the Government. 

The court held that with the excep- 
tion of a few minor details Stannard's 
business with the United States was 
ended. The victorious sub-contractors 
are: A. Teichert. Home Manufacturing 
Company, D. Zelinsky, W. P. Fuller & 
Company, and the Pacific Floor Sanding 
Company.. 



Cement Plant for Porterville 

Deals are reported to have been closed 
by representatives of the Riverside Port- 
land Cement Company for the purchase 
of 1,000 acres of cement and lime rock 
lands in the Springfield district, near 
Porterville, and while there has been 
some effort on the part of the owners 
of the land to keep the deal secret, it 
is known that the purchase implies the 
early removal to this district of at least 
la part of the big industrial enterprise 
from the Riverside section. The South- 
ern California plant has been fighting 
perennial lawsuits brought by owners of 
orange groves, who claim the oranges 
are injured by dust from the cement 
works. 



"Pacific" Sanitary Ware 

The following letter is self-explana- 
tory; 

To the Editor: — Due to the fact that there has 
been some misunderstanding on account of the re- 
cent importation of an eastern sanitary ware hav- 
ing a name somewhat similar to ours, we wish to 
state that all enameled iron ware made at Rich- 
mond, California, is sold and known as "Pacific" 
ware, and under no other name. 

We also wish to announce to the interested pub- 
lic that Mr. Newton W. Stern has succeeded Mr. 
Euphrat as general manager of our company, and 
that the latter has not been connected with our 
company in any way for the last six months. 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Co., 

By N. W. Stern. 



Plans for Shredded Wheat Factory 

Working drawings for the Shredded 
Wheat factory to be erected in Oakland 
have been finished by Architects Ho- 
bart & Cheney, Crocker Building, San 
Francisco. Construction will be rein- 
forced concrete, and the total cost will 
be approximately $125,000. 



Two Stockton Buildings 

Architect Glenn Allen, Monadnock 
Building, San Francisco, is preparing 
plans for a Class "C" lodge building for 
the Stockton Moose, also a hotel build- 
ing which will be built adjoining to the 
Mooses' home. Both buildings will in- 
volve an expenditure of more than $100,- 
000. 



$50,000 Residence 

Architects Hunt and Burns, 701 
Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, have 
made drawings for a large residence to 
be erected at Beverly Hills for Henry D. 
Lombard of Beverly. The cost will be 
about $50,000. 

May Hold Competition 

The Sacramento Bee says that Archi- 
tect R. A. Herold may not draw plans 
for a $208,000 Hall of Justice for the 
city as there may be a competition. 
Architect Charles Hemmings has made 
a written ofifer to the City Commis- 
sion to draw the plans for $9,250, it is 
said, and the ofifer will be acted on by the 
Commission later. 




Heating and Lighting 



Plumbing and Electrical Work 



The Electric Contractor 

By C. F. BUTTE 
(Continued from January Number.) 

THE method of handling your material 
in your stockrooms and at the buildings 
can increase or decrease your ultimate cost. 

In regard to the purchase price of mate- 
rials naturally one would believe that the 
maximum quantity discount is the proper 
method to reduce the cost of your work. 
While this deduction may seem real upon 
first glance, yet dead stock on your shelves 
is the same as dead wood in the firm, both 
eating profits and values. The quantity of 
any item that a contractor should purchase 
depends upon the margin of discounts and 
the length of time it will require to use up 
the entire lot of goods. 

I believe the depreciation of value for old 
stock on hand at time of inventory is prac- 
tically unknown to most contractors, but 
many of the larger supply houses depreciate 
SO per cent and some 100 per cent any stock 
that has not moved for one year. The aim 
of most larger firms in regard to stock on 
hand is to order three months' supply and 
not more. 

The contractor many times deceives him- 
self by purchasing large quantities to get 
an extra 2^ or 5 per cent and in the end 
he must try to work off a lot of junk and 
old stock which requires efifort and time, 
increasing his final costs. 

I do not want to be understood as advo- 
cating small purchases, but I do advocate 
economical purchases and in quantities to 
meet your live demands. 

A stock record would show in what quan- 
tity you would be justified to purchase your 
supplies and with your net discount sheets 
and by a few hours' application of human 
efficiency you will be able to determine the 
sizes of your orders. 

With proper attention by the contractor 
to this point, a common source of dissatis- 
faction between the contractor and jobber 
could be remedied and the amount of 
protection a jobber could give the contrac- 
tor over an occasional large outside pur- 
chaser could be more easily determined. The 
jobbers point out that the contractor is 
prone to purchase in small quantities irre- 
spective of his requirements and justly 
contends that the small orders cannot be 
handled without losing money. ' In this 
case the buyer is paying for his own extrav- 
agance, because the deficit has to be made 
up. One of the things that the small buyer 



must realize is that hand-to-mouth methods 
in the purchase of electrical supplies is an 
extravagance. He could save himself con- 
siderable money in a year if he could buy 
a goodly proportion of his material at 
maximum discount rates. In this way he 
could economize on cartage charges, could 
eliminate mistakes, and be in pocket just 
the difference that the jobber has to charge 
against him for handling his small, unprof- 
itable orders, and what would be required 
to supply the same amount of material in 
the same period of time in bulk, thereby 
increasing profits. 

The placing of future delivery orders for 
work not started should be done by every 
contractor, especially when the market is 
low. 

Labor cost is an item in every contract 
that must be watched closely and with 
assiduity. As I have stated before an ex- 
cessive cost of labor on a job is not always 
the fault of the workman, although the 
moral attitude, the physical temperament 
and the mental state of the men materially 
affect the total cost. The selection of hon- 
est, sober, industrious men with good 
health, moral habits, a cheerful disposition 
and some interest in their work should 
keep the cost of labor on an even basis 
and at the least possible amount. 

The best results can be obtained by asso- 
ciating closely as possible with your men. ' 
The feeling that the contractor will take 
advantage of his employees whenever pos- 
sible should not exist but fair play should 
exist at all times with a consistent, regular 
and even basis of working. A spasmodic 
encouragement of your men, either by tem- 
porary increase of pay, or promises of long 
employment, does not engender harmony 
or sincerity either to yourself or your fel- 
low contractors. 

The method of keeping cost records, I 
will not touch upon, though I want to say 
that the contractor who states he does not 
keep any cost record, as he cannot keep it 
accurately in all details, should refer to my 
previous remarks on overhead expense and 
memorize the last part : 
There were thirty-nine reasons all togther 
Why I failed and was put on the "run." 
The thirty-ninth and most important was — 
I should never have begun. 

The association of men, of crafts, is 
known in history as far back as the second 
and third centuries B. C, and has been 
generally induced for the pleasures of mu- 



114 



The Architect and Engineer 



tual enjoyment, for the advancement of 
intellect, for the attainment of some com- 
mon cause, for which the support and 
co-operation of numbers were necessary. 

The objects of our association and the 
reasons for our banding together are many 
fold, but primarily and practically we are 
banded together for one purpose of benefit- 
ing our business. 

"Benefiting our business" can be applied, 
interpreted and defined in many ways and 
it is true we must apply efforts, work and 
energies in many ways to obtain this result. 
However, no matter what we do, what we 
can do or what we will do, will always and 
can always be encompassed v,'ithin aiid de- 
fined by the word educational. 

The adoption of standard materials is 
educational, the adoption of standard speci- 
fications is educational, the application of 
overhead expense in estimating is educa- 
tional, the addition of a reasonable profit 
to our work is educational, adoption of any 
mutual agreements is educational and m 
fact we cannot act in any way or manner 
unless it is educational. These are all 
educational in the sense that we must show 
how any action we may take or advocate 
will, when applied, correct faults and er- 
rors, elevate our business, prove of value, 
increase our capacities, save our expendi- 
ture for expense items, give our customers 
a higher grade of work, and increase our 
revenues and profits. 

There are many ways in which our asso- 
ciation will endeavor to obtain better con- 
ditions in our business. Each and every 
one requires sacrifice of time, a great deal 
of real work and many eflforts by our mem- 
bers, as through collective working we can 
only obtain anything of real sound value. 

The success of any organization depends 
upon holding out to its members something 
of mutual benefit rather than benefits of 
an mdividual character. Personal dilifer- 
ences or individual benefits must never be 
permitted to exist in any association, as 
nothing as more harmful to the affiliating 
of men necessarily of different tempera- 
ments and characters as this one point. 
Continual mutual development must take 
place to create the feeling of mutual help, 
mutual enjoyment and mutual encourage- 
ment in good endeavor and it must and 
will be the aim of our association to always 
bear these words in mind. 

The work of our association during the 
past will bear out my assertion that the 
personal equation is always eliminated in 
the efforts put forth. With the experience 
gained in this work, the results we have 
already obtain and with the spirit of co- 
operation more firmly imbedded than ever 
heretofore, the success, the benefits and the 
value the association will be to the contrac- 
tor and to the many allied branches dealing 
with the contractor will unquestionably and 
without argument be many fold greater 
than it has ever been heretofore. 



Many good deeds, many good efforts and 
many good results are yet to be part of 
the work our association will undertake, 
and I say our association for you, and you 
constitute our association and the good 
deeds, good efforts and the good results 
are only part of your work. 

Standardization is now one of the ques- 
tions foremost in all lines of industry. 

All manufacturers of the present age en- 
deavor to standardize their product. All 
business houses of note standardize their 
methods and why should not we standard- 
ize our work? Why should not we benefit 
by the experience of others? Why should 
we not grasp and obtain all the benefits 
possible that we may see others enjoy? 

Standardization of materials now seems 
to be a vital question. Why should we be 
compelled to purchase a small quantity of 
a certain kind of material for one contract 
when our shelves are filled with material 
of the same quality, but of a different kind 
or make? Our association should take up 
the question of standardizing quality and 
not make, in order that the standard stocks 
carried by any contractor can be used on 
all his work. Along these lines I may quote 
a clipping as follows : 

"The Engineering Association of China, 
having headquarters at Shanghai, has un- 
dertaken the standardization of electrical 
supplies throughout China. This is proving 
a rather difficult undertaking because of 
the great' variety of supplies now shipped 
into China from various parts of the world. 
It is recognized, however, that far-reaching 
benefits would result from the proposed 
standardization, and as a result the con- 
suming public is encouraging the move- 
ment." 

The standard specifications and specifica- 
tions drawn up by engineers and specialists 
should be advocated by our association. 
Specifications drawn up by engineers not 
endeavoring to sell any particular make or 
brand of materials, but rather specifying 
standard quality should also be advocated 
by this association. The relationship the 
contractor should have with the engineer 
you will hear thoroughly discussed and I 
will not take up any of your time on this 
subject. 

The handling of legislative matters per- 
taining to electrical construction and instal- 
lation work has been always well kept in 
hand by our association and the possibilities 
along these lines in the future are great. 
The values we may obtain by proper legis- 
lation are considerable if our efforts are 
properly applied along these lines, as it is 
possible to enforce the keeping up of quality 
and standard by means of ordinances and 
laws when properly drawn up. Licensing 
of the electrical contractors has been re- 
ceiving much attention of late throughout 
the entire country. A license tends to fix 
the responsibility of the contractor and 
enforces him to comply with all regulations 



The Architect and Engineer 



115 



and the National Code, it also tends to 
place the business on a higher plane. 

1 he matter of interpreting N. E. C. rules 
and local ordinances is of great iinportance 
and with co-operative work between the 
California Inspectors' Association and our 
association, much good can be accomplished. 
The necessity of unifonn interpretation is 
essential to standardization of construction 
work and the spirit shown by the Califor- 
nia Inspectors' Association in assembling 
in Sacramento during our convention as- 
sures the fulfillment of our efforts along 
these lines. 

The standardization of telephone con- 
struction work within buildings has been 
actively advanced by the telephone com- 
pany and with the co-operation of our asso- 
ciation the standards they now have in 
press and which apply to the entire Pacific 
Coast will become effective, redounding 
to our benefit and advancement. 

There are many other questions that can 
only be handled and solved by the collective 
efforts of an association, which I will not 
endeavor to touch upon at this time. 

In conclusion I want to talk to the man 
who makes the query "What do I get out 
of the assoeiation?" Yes! What do you 
get out of the association? Do you ask 
the same question when you undertake any- 
things? No — emphaticallv no. You e-xpect 
hope and anticipate that you inay get some- 
thing and work like hell to fulfill your 
expectations, hopes and anticipations. You 
never stop at the start before beginning 
and ask this self same question, nor do 
you never start at all and stay asking the 
question. 

What would this wonderful and glorious 
country of ours be today, if our forefathers 
never started, never undertook anything, 
never pioneered anything, but did nothing 
and asked the question — What do I get 
out of it? 

Did George Washington, the father of 
our country, ask this question when he 
crossed the Delaw-are on that stormy, freez- 
ing night and made tlie beginning of our 
glorious country possible? Did Abraham 
Lincoln, as he guarded the integrity, the 
welfare and the future life of our glorious 
states and Union during the days and nights 
of the strife of '61 ask this question? Did 
the pioneers of '49 as they started across 
unknown territories, unknown lands, beset 
by all hardships, dangers and risks — ask 
this question and sit idly at their original 
locations? No — again, emphatically no, as 
you today would not be and could not be 
enjoying the delights of our beloved State, 
our fertile valleys and our wonderful re- 
sources. Then, why do you sit idly at 
your desk, table or counter and ask this 
self same question? Did our mothers ask 
this same question as they spent sleepless 
nights, hours of anxiety, and days of solici- 
tude ; as they watched, protected and cared 
for you and me ? 



No, gentlemen, no. The reward each 
expected to obtain was tlirough efforts, 
through endeavors, through struggles and 
exertions with the fond hope, the fond 
expectations that such efforts may result 
in good. 

Now, gentlemen, who ask this question— 
what do I get out of it— become a member, 
become a worker, become a part of the 
whole endeavor and assist the association 
in its work of mutual encouragement in 
good endeavor and when you see the re- 
sults of your work and aid, you will wonder 
why you asked the question — What do I 
get out of it ? 



Practical Aspects of Electric Heating 

IN the application of- electric heaters for 
warming purposes the practice followed in 
the equipment of street cars is furnishing 
some valuable data. In a paper, for in- 
stance, by William S. Hammond. Jr.. vice- 
president of the Consolidated Car Heating 
Company, presented at the recent summer 
meeting of the American Society of Heat- 
ing and Ventilating Engineers, the speaker 
had some interesting things to say on the 
general subject, as well as on its bearing 
in connection with the heating of street 
cars. 

After calling attention to the fact that 
the highest efficiencies in such apparatus 
as steam boilers, steam engines and electric 
motors are attained in large and well-pro- 
portioned units, the speaker stated that in 
electric heating, large and small heating 
units are equally efficient and for this 
reason electric heaters readily adapt them- 
selves for use in locations widely separated 
and in which small amounts of heat are 
required. Dividing electric heat into a 
large number of small units does not, there- 
fore, mean loss of eificiency. 

1007f OF EFFICIENCY REALIZED IN ELECTRIC 
HE.-\TERS 

The high efficiency of electric heaters is 
due to the fact that the electric heater is 
the only form of translating device in which 
I007f efficiency is realized. It is well known 
that energy is indestructible. It is wholly 
converted in every translating device. It 
is true that translating devices generally 
convert energy into several forms and 
therefore, any one form of energy contains 
less than the whole. Electrical apparatus 
generally transforms into the desired form 
of energy less than 1009f. Now if the 
theory of the conservation or persistence 
of force is true, all of the energy can be 
accounted for in some way. 

Let us examine, for a moment, the forms 
of energy into which electricity may be 
converted, first, mechanical motion ; second, 
chemical action ; third, light ; fourth, mag- 
netism and fifth, heat. This list, the author 
believes, comprises all possible forms of 
power into which electrical energy may be 
transformed. 



116 



The Architect and Emfhiecr 



By reference to the table, the author has 
attempted to show some of these transfor- 
mations. 

100 UNITS OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY TRANS- 
FORMED 



By _w_ _S_ _j_ _S^ 

Mechanical action 90 

Chemical action 50 

Light 10 

Magnetism 2 

Heat 50 8 90 100 

Total ..100 100 100 100 

It is assumed that we transform 100 units 
of electrical energy by different devices. Out 
of 100 units of electrical energy employed 
in the operation of electrolysis, we find that 
no mechanical motion is produced, chemical 
action SO'/f, no light, no magnetism and 
50% of heat is produced, or a combined 
total efficiency of 1007c. If we take the 
electric motor, we find that it is impossible 
to build an electric motor without resis- 
tance, and when a current passes through 
this motor we always obtain heat. There- 
fore, in 100 units of electrical energy which 
are transformed in the motor 907f appro.xi- 
mately, may be transformed into mechanical 
motion, no chemical action is produced, no 
light, two units transformed into magnetism 
and eight units in the form of heat, giving 
us a total of units of energy in these dif- 
ferent forms of force of 100, or exactly 
equivalent to the number of units of elec- 
trical energy with which we started. 

If now, we consider the incandescent 
electric lamp and transform 100 units of 
electrical energy, we find no mechanical mo- 
tion is produced, no chemical action, about 
\Q'7r in the form of light, no magnetism 
and 90% of heat. 

Of course it is apparent that the so- 
called efficiency of each of these transfor- 
mations depends upon the useful work 
which we are endeavoring to produce with 
the electric current. If it is the electric 
motor, 90% is realized. If the incandes- 
cent lamp, 10%, although, if we were using 
the incandescent lamp as an electric heater, 
we would call its efficiency 90%, instead 
of 10%. 

We then come to the transformation in 
an electric heater. Again, we will employ 
100 units of electric energy. We find that 
there is no mechanical motion, there is no 
chemical action, no light, no magnetism. 
Heat, therefore, must be the only form of 
energy into which the 100 units of electric 
energj' have been transformed. The elec- 
tric heater, then, is the only case that comes 
within our knowledge where 100 units of 
electric energy may be transformed into 
100 units of any other one form of force. 



FIXED RELATION BETWEEN ELECTRIC ENERGY 
AND HE.AT 

The fixed relation between electric energy 
and heat makes it easy to determine the 
amount of electric energy which is equiva- 
lent to a unit of heat. Careful tests have 
determined upon. 1,047 watts as equivalent 
to 1 B. T. U. or 1 lb. degree F. Therefore, 
it becomes an easy matter to determine the 
exact amount of heat which is produced 
in electric heaters when the consumption 
of current is known. 

For example, if we find the number of 
watts, by multiplying the number of am- 
peres passing through the heater by the 
difference of voltage of the heater terminals 
and then divide the number of watts by 
1,047, we will have for a quotient the num- 
ber of British thermal units of heat gener- 
ated in the electric heater per second. If 
we consider the electric heaters in a car to 
be using as a maximum 12 amperes of 
current on a 500-voIt circuit, we will find 
that 12 amperes of current multiplied by 
500 will give us 6,000 watts. Dividing 6,000 
watts by 1.047, we obtain 5.73 B. T. U. of 
heat generated in the car per second. Multi- 
plying 5.73 B. T. U. by 60 will give us 
343.8 B. T. U. per minute. This is equiva- 
lent to 20,628 B. T. U. per hour ; or, since 
a B. T. U. is the amount of heat necessary 
to raise 1 lb. of water 1° F., the heat gener- 
ated per hour would be equivalent to the 
raising of 20,628 lbs. of water 1° F. 

In this way, with a given consumption of 
current, it is very easy to determine exact 
values in heat units, or if we know what 
lieat units are required, it is a simple mat- 
ter to ascertain the exact consumption of 
electric energy necessary to produce this 
amount of heat by means of the electric 
heater. 



Gets Splendid Business Proposition 

Considerable interest is attached to the 
announcement that Mr. Garfield Myers 
has become the direct factory represen- 
tative in San Francisco of the Insley 
Manufacturing Company of Indianapolis, 
Ind., the Marsh-Capron Manufacturing 
Company of Chicago, and the Mead- 
Morrison Company of Boston, three of 
the largest concrete machinery enter- 
prises in the country. Mr. Myers has 
opened offices in the Hearst building. 
He is recognized as one of the best-in- 
formed concrete machinery men on the 
Pacific coast, and is thoroughly familiar 
with the local situation. He has lately 
been connected with the construction de- 
partment of Parrott & Companj', prior to 
which he was a member of the firm of 
Langford, Feltz & Myers, with offices in 
the Rialto building. 

For a number of years Mr. Myers 
handled the Ransome mixer business for 
the Norman B. Livermore Company. 



The Architect and Engineer 



117 



Otis Elevator Has Fine Display at Exposition 



THE Otis Elevator Company has 
worked out a most attractive scheme 
of decoration for its space in the exposi- 
tion Palace of Machinery, forming a 
natural and artistic setting for its exhibit 
of elevator machines. 

Most electric elevator machines of the 
larger type are located over the hatch- 
ways at the top of the building — many in 
pent houses on the roof. This condition 
has been taken advantage of to turn the 
space into a reproduction of a typical 
roof garden in one of our large cities, 
with pent houses inclosing the elevator 
machines. 

As the visitor steps through one of the 
gracefully arched entrances, between clas- 
sic pilasters surmounted by a cornice ex- 
tending across the entire front and inter- 
laced with lattice work, he might easily 
imagine himself in the roof garden of a 
popular hotel. .\n arrangement of per- 
golas, thickly entwined with foliage and 
studded with the dim lights of vari- 
colored bulbs, produces a rich, restful 
effect, while through the glass panels of 
the pent houses, which are softly lighted 
by the indirect system, are seen the 
elevator machines as they would appear 
in an actual installation. 

Looking over the roof parapet on the 
right, the visitor sees the familiar mass of 
towering skyscrapers of lower Xew York. 
The buildings are dotted with twinkling 
lights and through the lighted windows 
of the tallest buildings can be seen minia- 
ture elevators in motion. Walking along 
the ninety-two-foot length of the booth to 
the other end, the visitor looks out over 
the city of San Francisco and here again 
may be seen miniature elevators at work 
in the principal buildings. 

The pent houses — three in number — are 
arranged along the rear of the roof and 
are so constructed as to allow a close in- 
spection of the elevator machines from 
all sides. 

In pent house No. 1 is an Otis 1:1 gear- 
less traction elevator machine, complete 
with controller and governor. .^ car 
switch on the outer wall of the pent 
house controls the operation of the ma- 
chine. -Alongside of this pent house is 
shown the car safety device used with 
this type of machine, and its method of 
operation. A stopping switch and hatch- 
way limit switches mounted above the 
safety device illustrates the action of 
these switches on the safety, independent 
of the car switch operation. 

In pent house \o. 2 is located an Otis 
2:1 gearless traction elevator machine 
with governor and controller. This type 
of machine is particularly interesting be- 
cause of its wide application for use in 



buildings of moderate height, although it 
still retains the gearless drive principle 
found in its larger contemporarj-, the 1 :1 
type of gearless machine. 

In pent house No. 3 is an Otis worm 
gear traction machine for alternating 
current circuits, with variable speed con- 
trol. The company's pioneer work in 
alternating current apparatus lends pe- 
culiar interest to this machine, which is 
arranged for two-sped operation. 

In this portion of the Otis exhibit 
there is illustrated by picture and de- 
scription the progress of the power ele- 
vator from its invention, through its 
various stages of steam, hydraulic and 
electric motive power, to its present de- 
velopment: a story of how Otis elevators 
are made safe to ride in and the purposes 
and uses of escalators, inclined elevators 
and incline railway. 

In the remaining space allotted to the 
company, just south of a subentrance to 
the building, will be seen an automatic 
push button elevator in operation. This 
machine has been installed for the use 
of exposition officials, but it will be so 
constructed that the machine and hatch- 
way will serve as an interesting exhibi- 
tion for visitors. 

The Otis exhibit may be said to be at 
once original, dignified and beautiful. 
The visitor will find no more interesting 
e-xhibit in the Palace of Machinery. 



Personal Side of the Millwcrk Question 

.Architects, builders and even the owners 
themselves appreciate a planing mill where 
the interest does not cease after the mate- 
rial is loaded on the truck or car. They 
like to have the interest continue till the 
work is delivered and set in place. The 
experience of many contractors is that few 
mills give this personal interest and service. 
From what has been gleaned from many 
builders the Dudfield Lumber Company of 
Palo .-Mto, Cal., is a mill well known for 
giving all their jobs this personal attention, 
from the simplest to the most intricate 
details. This is especially appreciated in 
the case of the many beautiful country 
homes "down the Peninsula" on which the 
Dudfield Company has supplied the mill- 
work. 

Some of their recent work has been the 
Harry Haehl residence in Palo Alto ; the 
Half Moon Bay Catholic Church, Welch 
& Carey, architects ; the M. J. Brandenstein 
residence at Fair Oaks, Albert Farr, archi- 
tect : a home for Mr. Hill, of Hills Bros.; 
the residence of J. E. Fisher at San Jose, 
and the recently completed Sunnyvale 
School, F. D. Wolfe, architect. 



state, County and Municipal 
Engineering 



Good Roads— Water— Sewers 
-Bridges — Fire Protection 



Road Construction Plant and the 
Contractor 

UPON undertaking road construction 
it is required to be determined what 
type of construction plant is best suited 
to the work in hand, how much plant 
is required to complete the work with 
the greatest economy and protit, and 
what additional plant is required to ex- 
pedite construction so that time limita- 
tions will not be exceeded. 

Every construction project has certain 
fixed limitations within which the con- 
tractor must keep in planning work to 
be accomplished. These limits may be 
due to varied and uncontrollable causes, 
such las the type and number of laborers 
available, the location of the project with 
reference to bases of supplies, the length 
of profitable working season, topo- 
graphic conditions with reference to ease 
of hauling and as aiifecting the installa- 
tion and use of plant, climatic conditions 
during the working season — a most im- 
portant factor — and facilities for quickly 
and profitably disposing of or storing 
plant after the completion of the work. 
Moreover, on contract work specifica- 
tions invariably define other limits, such 
as the time of completion, the type and 
quality of material to be used, involving 
possible delay in securing materials at 
the proper time and consequent disor- 
ganization and loss to the contractor, 
and the possibility of important changes 
in the plan and extent of the work whi-le 
in progress. 

The foregoing are the' broad general 
conditions confronting the contractor 
upon undertaking road construction 



work. In attacking this equipment prob- 
lem the three important questions to 
answer are: What plant is best suited 
to the work, how shall it be acquired, 
and what will be its value after the com- 
pletion of the work? In answering these 
questions sound experience is undoubt- 
edly of greatest value in the proper cor- 
relation and nice weighing of the condi- 
tions affecting the proposed work. 

There are. however, a few general 
rules of thumb in vogue among contrac- 
tors that are worthy of mention. Plant 
is a substitute for labor, and its use is 
economical only when it will yield a 
good return on the investment over and 
above the labor cost without the use of 
plant. The economic ratio between plant 
and labor is, in a measure, a fixed quan- 
tity for each construction project. 
Whether or not any plant at all is need- 
ed and what is the least amount with 
which the work may be accomplished 
are fundamental questions. Finally, 
second-hand olant is to be avoided if 
the contractor expects to continue in 
the same line of contracting; if he ex- 
pects to undertake a diflferent type of 
work on the next project it may be a 
profitable investment. 

Many contractors do not figure on 
plant expense when bidding on work. 
The first job undertaken is frequently 
figured with no profit other than the 
plant purchased. On succeeding jobs 
plant cost is not included, unless new 
plant is required. In short, the job pays 
for the plant. In figuring on the dis- 
posal of the plant at the conclusion of 
the work, as a rule, heavy machinery 




Reg. U. S. Pat. Office 

Veneered Panels 
tKat ARE good — 
order today from 



Wybro Panels 
are Good Panels 

Wybro Panels have good qualities. They have a 
smooth finish, evenness and strength that cannot be 
equaled by any other make. 

They are GOOD Panels thru and thru — always 
uniform in quality and everlastingly good. 

Whitb: Brothers 



5tK and Drannan Sts. 



San Francisco 



The Architect and Enzincer 



119 



if sold will not bring to exceed 25 per 
cent of the first cost. Light machinery 
and small tools are usually worn out 
on the job and at its termination must 
be disposed of as scrap. Second-hand 
machinery ordinarily sells at about 50 
per cent of its first cost after overhaul- 
ing by machinery dealers. The salvage 
value of second-hand machinery but 
slightly used is larger than that of slight- 
ly used new machinery. In other words, 
the ratio of the value of third-hand to 
second-hand machinery is greater than 
second-hand to first-hand machinery. 

Construction plant is the great prob- 
lem of the road contractor. The cost 
of plant used frequently exceeds 35 per 
cent of the total cost of the work ac- 
complished and seldom falls below 20 per 
cent. Unless plant is keenly judged, 
shrewdly acquired and kept constantly 
at work the profits of the road contrac- 
tor may be continually feeding the mill 
in the merry-go-round of machinery pur- 
chasing. — Engineering and Contracting. 



Nice Brick and Terra Cotta Contract 

The Independent Sewer Pipe Com- 
pany, 335 Soutli Los Angeles street, Los 
Angeles, has been awarded the contract 
for furnishing the terra cotta and facing 
brick for the exterior of the seven-story 
reinforced concrete department store 
building being erected at Seventh street 
and Grand avenue, Los Angeles, for the 
J. W. Robinson Company. Frederick 



STRUCTURAL 

STEEL FRESNO 



Complete Stock of 
COLUMNS ANGLES 
GIRDERS TEES 
BEAMS PLATES 

CHANNELS CASTINGS 



MODERN EQUIPPED STEEL, 

FABRICATING PLANT and 

IRON FOUNDRY 

W furnish and erect Building 

Steel, Bridge Steel, Tank Towers, 

Sidewalk Doots, Fire Escapes, 

Ornamental and Cast Iron. 

J. M. BURNETT 
IRON WORKS 



Fresno, California 



Noonan and William Richards. Brock- 
man building. Los Angeles, are the archi- 
tect and engineer. 



PRATT BLDG. MATERIAL CO.'S 
NLW SAND PIT ON YUBA RIVER 
AT MARYSVILLE. FORMERLY 
MARY5VILLE SAND AND BRICK CO. 




LOADING SAND FROM YUBA RIVER AT MARYSVILLE 

The Pratt Building Material Co., C. F. Pratt, President, ship Marysville Sand as 

far north as Oregon and south to Modesto, San Jose, San Francisco and other points. 
^-■' Architects, Engineers and Contractors say that Marysville Sand is the best sand 
in California for Concrete work. It is ver>' clean and sharp. 

Phone for a Sample to Pratt Building Material Co. — Hearst-Examiner Building, 
Douglas 300— Easy to remember. 



120 



The Architect and F.w'ineer 



n^ 




/ 


THE BI6-AN-LITTLE CONCRETE and MORTAR MIXER 


Big Output — Little Weight 
Bifir Profits —Uittle Cost 
Capacit>' as Qu. Vds. a Dar 


pi 


idE 




All rounded surfaces — no corners for concrete to lodge in. 

Revolves on ball thrust bearing, hermetically sealed to 
prevent grit from working in. 

Equipped with levers for turning over and locking device 
to hold drum in place while mixing. 


W^' 


7^ 




EDWARD R. BACON COMPANY 

5 Pacific Coast Agents 




'51-53 Minna St., San Francisco Tel. Sutter 1675 



The Best Road Material 

HE vexing question as to the best ma- 
terial with which to build roads in 
these days of automobiles is concisely 
answered by a ' good roads worker out 
in Washington — apparently the "father" 
of good roads in that State — by one wort! 
— "brains." The epigram as applied to 
the construction of roads, or anything 
else, is not new, but it directs attention 
from speculation whether the ideal road ■ 
material has been, or can be found, to 
the fact that whatever the niiaterial, il 
must be handled with intelligence. Xo 
motorist needs to go far from Springfield 
to point out stretches on which monev 
seems to have been wasted, not through 
the fault of the material so much ris in 
the way it was laid. For example, ce- 
mented surfaces have not always worn 
well, although around Detroit, the very 
home of the automobile and a district 
in which the road problem might be 
assumed acute, cement roads have 
proved notably successful. Just outside 
of New Haven on the way to Bridge- 
port a stretch of cement roadway some 
seven miles long was opened a few weeks 
ago; its wearing qualities are now the 
question, for the present surface is be- 
yond criticism. 

The particular complaint made by this 
Washington speaker at the annual con- 



vention of the State Good Roads .\sso- 
ciation in Spokane was that the State 
University had discontinued its course in 
the construction and maintenance of 
highways. He maintained that "ten thou- 
sand men 'can make a watch where one 
man can 'make a road.' " While that is 
obviously a rhetorical exaggeration, un- 
less it be admitted that the country is 
absolutely without competent roadmak- 
ers, it is clear that roadmaking is of 
necessity becoming a more highly spe- 
cialized affair and one which calls in- 
creasingly for vocational training and 
scientific study. When our Massachusetts 
hill towns in their desire for a revival 
of prosperity go deep into their own 
pockets to secure good roads with sup- 
plementary State aid, the loss would be 
a peculiarly severe one if. either through 
a penny wise and pound foolish policy 
in the use of funds or through lack of 
intelligence in actual construction, roads 
so built should lack in durability. The 
State authorities have here a large bur- 
den and it is to be hoped that certain 
stretches of road under construction last 
summer will confound the predictions of 
venturesome lay critics as to their abil- 
ity to stand up under traffic. — Springfield 
(Mass.) Republican. 



DIECKMANN HARDWOOD CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

350 to 398 BEACH STREET, COR. TAYLOR 
CARRY A LARGE WELL ASSORTED STOCK OF 

HARDWOODS 

AND SOLICIT YOUR INQUIRIES. 



vriting to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Eiis'incer 



121 



The California Highway Bulletin 

Several of the highway commissions 
which are now in charge of road con- 
struction in some of the most progres- 
sive states have adopted the wise policy 
of publishing, at more or less regular in- 
tervals, bulletins dealing with the work 
in their hands and intended to give the 
voters and taxpayers a clear idea of the 
way the public moneys are being ex- 
pended for highways. These bulletins. 
by the use of manj' handsome photo- 
graphs and by the inclusion of interest- 
ing articles which have not only technical 
but also literary merit, are becoming 
worthy of the title of magazines. The 
Iowa Service Bulletin is especially note- 
worthy. One of its most useful activi- 
ties is that of vividly presenting the un- 
fortunate and sometimes tragic results 
of the retention on highways traveled 
by modern heavy vehicles of old wooden 
bridges or steel structures which have 
become weakened by corrosion. 

The high water mark in publications 
of this character seems to have been 
reached in the Januarj', 1915. edition of 
the California Highway Bulletin. This 
periodical will compare very favorably 
both in appearance and in the genuine in- 
formation afforded with any road build- 
ing magazine published in the United 
States. It is well printed, well illus- 
trated, and notably well edited. Groups 
of beautiful views of completed highways 
under the varying conditions of sea 
shore, valley, and mountain regions form 
full page illustrations. A photograph 
published over the caption "Building the 
State Highway Through Northern Cali- 
fornia Forests" would make a beautiful 
enlargement. Another full page is occu- 
pied by eight illustrations over the title 
"Type of Bridges and Culverts on Cali- 
fornia State Highway." The bridges are 
of concrete of modern design, which 
combines strength and beauty. The one 
illustration which represents a culvert 
shows the installation of twin Armco 
iron corrugated pipes. 



Perfection Reversible 
Window 



Simple, Durable, Reversible, Weather- 
proof, easily installed, Cheap and 
Noiseless. Adapted for Casement 
Windows, Double Vertical Windows or 
Single Vertical Windows with or with- 
out cords or weights and French Win- 
dow effects. Secures Perfect Ventila- 
tion, Easily Cleaned, Insures Safety in 
Cleaning. 



WRITE OR PHONE FOR DKM0NSTR.4TION 

EMIL BLOSSFELD, Inventor and Manager 

Perfection Revers- 
ible Window Co. 

2025 Market St., San Francisco 

Phones Market 8IS8-33S3 



The Bulletin is printed for free distri- 
bution and anyone interested in road 
building may procure it by writing to the 
California Highway Commission, Forum 
building, Sacramento, and enclosing two 
cents in postage. 

The highways of California promise to 
be one of the principal sources of inter- 
est and of pleasure to the thousands of 
visitors to the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion; and as a large number of these will 
undoubtedly make the trip by automobile, 
the character of these roads will be a 
matter of direct personal concern. 



HIGH GRADE 

ELKTRICAL CONSTRUCTION WORK 

FOR BUILDINGS 

BUTTE [NGINKRING AND [LKTRIC CO., 683-87 Howard Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention ihis magazine. 



122 The Architect and Engineer 

RANSOME CONCRETE COMPANY 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

1012-1014 eighth street, 1218 broadway, 

Sacramento, cal. Oakland, Cal. 

LESTER H. STOCK 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

C. ANDERSON Member 12 QEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Mgr. Construction QEN. CONT'R ASSN. Phone Douglas 4596 

Phone Douglas 3224 

HUINTER <& HUDSOIN, Engineers 

Designers of Heating, Ventilating and Wiring Systems. 

Mechanical and Electrical Equipment of Buildings. 
739 Rialto Bldg. San Francisco, Cal. 

LIGHTING HEATING PLUMBING 

We Guarantee Good Work and Prompt Service. flNo Job too small — none too big. We Employ 
Experts in all Three Departments and they are always at your service Get Our Figure. 



CENTRAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

186 STEVENSON STRFET. SAN FRANCISCO 411 EXCHANGE B 

Phones : Douglas 387; home. J 1694 L. R. BOYNTON, Mir 



E. K. WOOD LUMBER CO. 

QEO. B. WADDELL. Manager 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LUMBER MILL WORK and MOULDINGS 

WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF PROMPT RAIL SHIPMENT 

Office, Yards and Wharves 
Phnr,,..! I '"«""'■''' "2 FREDERICK & KINQ STREETS 

i-nones , Home B 1127 East Oakland, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA GRANITE COMPANY 

Phone Sutter 2646 STONE CONTRACTORS 

San Francisco Office, 518 Sharon Bldg. Main Office. Rocklin, Placer Co., Cal. 

Quarries. Rocklin and Porterville Telephone Main 82 




1 >■ . - M.rk Re,:. U. S Pat. urtice 

iTiiarjiileed Ir.-f Iron, ail iniperliLikiti^ ,j| braid or finisli. Can alwavs be distinguished bv our trade 

mark, thi- spots on the cord, Send (or samples, l.sts, etc SAMSON CORDAGE WORKS. BOSTON. MASS 

Pacific Coast .Atjent. lOHN T. ROWNTREE. 875 Monadtiock Bids.. San francisco. Cal.. and 701 Hiqjins Blilo,, los Anjeles, Cal. 



BURT T. OWSLEY 

General Contractor 

311 SHARON BLDC. PMONE SUTTER 2340 

San Francisco 



The Architect and Ens:inecr 



123 



The Building Outlook in Oregon 



By A. J. CAPRON 



THE past year, in the building line ni 
Portland, has been one of unusual de- 
pression ; we might say, "These be days that 
try men's souls." Architects have had little 
to do, likewise the contractor, although 
probably more estimates for construction 
have been gotten out during the past twelve 
months than any other year in the histoi} 
of Portland, and while it ranked third or 
fourth in the volume of construction in 
the United States for the year, yet the total 
was much less than for several years pre- 
vious. The prospects for 1915, however, are 
of material importance ; there are quite a 
large number of jobs projected, and these 
will ge ahead as quickly as they can oe 
financed. 

Our banks are loaded with money (para- 
do.xically when the money is in the banks 
it isn't in circulation). The new reserve 
bank feature will improve the financial situ- 
ation. 

One of the largest and most expensive, 
as well as ornate structures to be built this 
year will be the First National Bank build- 
ing at Fifth and Stark streets, Messrs. Shep- 
ley, Rutan & Coolidge, Ames building, Bos- 
ton, Mass., architects. The cost of this 
construction will probably exceed three- 
quarters of a million dollars. The building 
will be Class A, fireproof throughout, and 
devoted exclusively to the banking business. 
Preliminary plans provide for a high base- 
ment, or ground floor to be devoted to the 
security savings department, while the main 
floor, approached by steps, will be the bank 
proper, and the mezzanine floor will be 
devoted to the bookkeeping, and other simi- 
lar work. 

The Meier & Frank fireproof building, 
100 X 200 feet, is progressing rapidly at this 
date. Eight stories of steel have been 
erected, and presumably the building will be 
fifteen stories high. This will give them an 
L-shaped building, which, together with the 
present structure of 100 feet square, will 
make it by far the largest in the city, if 
not on the Coast, devoted to department 
store business. This building provides for 
a sub-basement the same as the previous 
construction. 

The Coin Machine Company is about to 
commence work upon the first unit of its 
building, a structure 100 x 200 feet and four 
stories high. 

The Doernebecher Furniture Company 
will erect a $60,000 fireproof addition to 
their present and already large complement 
of buildings. 

The O. W. R. & N. Company, together 
with the city of Portland, will build a large 
viaduct on the Sullivan's Gulch and Sandy 
Road Junction, involving a probable expen- 
diture of nearly one million of dollars. 

The municipality is doing a large amount 
of sewer and paving work, and contemplates 
an expenditure of several million dollars 



during 191S. Provided the Legislature 
makes the appropriation, a large Audito- 
rium will be built for the Oregon Agricul- 
tural College at Corvallis, complete plans 
for which show a massive structure of 
classic design and capable of seating 5,000 
persons. This project will involve an ex- 
penditure of over half a million dollars. 
Additions for other State institutions are 
also being provided for, the extent of the 
improvements depending upon the amount 
appropriated by the present session of the 
Legislature. 

The interstate bridge, across the Columbia 
river, connecting Portland with Vancouver 
and the State of Washington, plans for 
which are completed and bids called for, 
will be the most important construction for 
Portland this year. Messrs Harrington, 
Howard & Ash, engineers of Kansas City, 
have furnished the Commission with two 
types of construction, the lift draw, and the 
swing. The former is the same as they 
erected for the city of Portland known as 
the Hawthorne avenue bridge and the 
O. W. R. & N. R. R. bridge, the largest 
of its kind in the world. 

The total length of the river spans will 
be 5,000 feet and the approaches 12,000 
feet, involving the use of 9,500 tons of steel 
and an estimated expenditure of $1,750,000. 
The engineers estimate that it will require 
a year's time to build the bridge, although 
the well-known ability of the engineers to 
"drive," leads us to hope that a less time 
may see the bridge in use. The plans show 
a very fine looking structure of heavj', 
"through span" construction. Mr. Howard 
is the resident engineer and will give per- 
sonal attention to all details. Alternate pro- 
posals are called for and some twelve dif- 
ferent items are included and it is hoped 
that this will enable the Commissioners to 
save some money in the construction and 
yet obtain the best there is, at a minimum 
cost. The plans call for a clear roadway 
thirty-eight feet in width, with a foot walk 
five feet wide on either side. 

Three large school buildings are in proc- 
ess of construction for the city of Portland, 
at a total expenditure of over half a million 
dollars. In Portland, as in other cities, it 
is a difficult proposition to keep up the con- 
struction with the increased school attend- 
ance. An improved type of fireproof con- 
struction is contemplated in all plans. School 
Architect Narramore is making a good 
showing in his work. 

The city of Portland is taking steps to 
remove several dilapidated buildings which 
are little less than fire-traps and have been 
a menace for several years to the adjoining 
buildings. 

The large Courthouse, built a few years 
since at an expense of $2,000,000, is already 
proving too small for housing the various 
offices necessary. 



124 



The Architect and Eui:inc 




Mm\:\^^:^=ki^\ 




SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 311 California Street 

A. L. GREENE, Agent 

Sunset Paint Co. ) ( D. H. Rhodes 

627 So. Main Street } DISTRIBUTORS j 546 Valencia Street 
Los Angeles ) ( San Francisco 



"^on Bupritt 

Self Releasing Fire Exit Latches 

/Pat. U. S. and Canada 
Approved by New York Board of Fire Underwriters 
Absolutely Reliable 
Safeguard Against Panic Disasters 
A Few Dollars Spent for Safe Exits Should be a 
Mental Relief 
AGENTS ON THE COAST 

W. H. STEELE Los Angeles, Cal. 

A. W. PIKE & CO San Francisco, Cal. 

A. J. CAPRON Portland, Ore. 

F. T. CROWE & CO Spokane. Wash. 

F. T. CROWE & CO Tacoma, Wash. 

F. T. CROWE & CO Seattle, Wash. 

WM. N. O'NEIL & CO Vancouver, B. C. 

Ask for Catalogue No. 12 G 

VONNEGUT HARDWARE CO. 

GENERAL DISTRIBUTORS 

INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 
Universal Demand In "Sweefs Index," Pages 770-771 




When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



125 



The Columbia river highway, which, from 
a scenic point of view, will be the finest in 
the United States, will be completed this 
vear. The total cost of building this sixtv 
miles of roadway will be $2,000,000. A great 
deal of rock work is necessary, and in some 
places the roadway is cut out of the side 
of perpendicular cliffs a thousand feet or 
more in height. It is expected this vi-ill be 
a drawing card for tourists and incidentally 
help the automobile business. Last year 
the city completed, at an expenditure of 
over $300,000. the "Terwilliger Drive" in 
the southern portion of the city, from which 
a magnificent view may be had. 

The highway improvements contemplated 
during this year in and about Portland will 
involve, when completed, an expenditure of 
over $5,000.0(X). and it is considered the 
money is well spent. Notwithstanding the 
depression of business throughout the coun- 
try, Postoffice receipts show a constant 
increase. 

There seems to be no let-up in the number 
of smaller business blocks, and residences 
to be built. These, however, are not of an 
expensive type of construction. Sawmills 
and kindred lines show marked improve- 
ment. The shipment of grain to European 
countries, together with the material ad- 
vance in prices for wheat, which has never 
been exceeded in the history of Portland, 
has brought to Portland a large fleet of 
vessels. 

We also expect a great benefit from tour- 
ist travel due to the Panama and San Diego 
Expositions, and we will be materially 
helped by the two magnificent steamers be- 
ing completed by tlie Hill system to ply 
between Portland and San Francisco. These 
two ships, involving a cost (aside from dock 
improvements) of over $5,000,000. and for 
their type they far exceed in completeness 
anything on the Coast. It is expected these 
steamers will make the run to San Fran- 
cisco in twenty hours. 

The city of Portland is completing Munic- 
ipal Dock Xo. 2. (a fireproof structure) 
which, together with Dock \o. 1 and the 
warehouse connected therewith, places Port- 
land in the front rank for municipal-owned 
docks on the Coast. 

Plans are being drawn for a $900,000 
elevator to be located on water frontage yet 
to be selected. 

Flour mills are running overtime. Brick 
manufacturing plants seem to have all they 
can do, likewise the tile manufacturers. 

The Jason-Moore Company of \ew York 
have leased the lakes in Southern Oregon, 
from which they propose to extract the 
various products, which, with their plants 
and pipe lines, will involve an expenditure 
of two million and a half dollars, and lacks 
only confirmation by the Legislature to 
initiate the work. 

The banking business is in excellent shape 
and the reserve banks are receiving the 
new currency in exchange for the old form 
of national bank paper. 



Our new commission form of govern- 
ment has so far developed the new organiza- 
tion as to place the municipal affairs in 
a better working shape and it is hoped that 
there may be a material economy in the 
expenditure of public funds, and a conse- 
quent reduction in taxes. The present Leg- 
islature is pledged to economy, however 
they may be able to redeein those pledges. 
The State is growing, and it is necessary 
to keep up with its development. 

During the past year the State Highway 
Commission constructed a large number of 
permanent bridges. Major Henry L. Bowlby, 
State Highway Engineer, in charge. There 
will be a large number built during this 
year. The amount of construction depends 
largely on the appropriation of the counties, 
and they seem to be fully alive to the neces- 
sity of improvement and permanent highway 
construction. 

Taking everything into consideration, 
while the past year has been a severe one 
for everybody, yet the State of Oregon has 
held its own, and with a revival of good 
times will undoubtedly rapidly resume its 
former condition, and we feel hopeful for 
favorable results. 



California Convention of Whitney 
Window Salesmen 

One of the most interesting gatherings 
of building specialty salesmen held re- 
cently in San Francisco was the conven- 
tion on Thursday. January 28th, of the 
California salesmen of the \\'hitney Win- 
dow Company. The State offices of this 
compan}' are located at 522 Sharon build- 
ing. .\t this meeting were all the repre- 
sentatives of this company in California, 
as well as a representative of the sales 
force from Minnesota, and tlie president 
of the company, Mr. V. J. Whitney of 
Seattle, Wash. 

The business of this company in Cali- 
fornia has grown so rapid!)' since the 
local office was opened last September 
that W. H. Pringle, the State manager, 
called this convention largely for the 
purpose of discussing some of the special 
problems which have been presented. An 
enthusiastic gathering was the result, and 
manj' prospective special contracts were 
worked out with great success. The con- 
vention showed that the Whitney Win- 
dow is adapted to all sorts of conditions. 

A banquet followed the convention, at 
which the following were present: V. J. 
Whitney. Seattle, ^^'a5hington. president 
of the companv; Leon C. Warner, Min- 
neapolis. Minnesota, representing sales- 
men between the Rocky Mountains and 
the Mississippi river; Wm. H. Pringle. 
San Francisco. State manager; Carl H. 
Zeus. Los .\ngeles; Frank W. Lord, Sac- 
ramento; C. K. Grad)'. Xorthern Cali- 
fornia agent; W. B. Knapp. Oakland, and 
H. O. Jones, San Jose. 



126 



The Architect and Engineer 



Eiarly Participants in Canal Shipping 

One of the first big concerns of San 
Francisco to take advantage of the in- 
creased facihties for shipping since the 
opening of the Panama Canal is White 
Brothers, San Francisco's well known 
hardwood merchants. 

Another niche has been chiseled in 
the monument of progress through the 
completion of the Panama Canal, and 
it is with feelings of just pride and enter- 
prise that this firm claim the distinction 
of being the first to ship a whole train- 
load of hardwood lumber through this 
great commercial artery to their yards 
in San Francisco. This lumber was cut 
from the virgin tracts of Northern Miss- 
issippi, loaded during the last days of 
October and was run as a special train 
over the New Orleans. Mobile and Chi- 
cago Railroad, already becoming knov,n 
as the "Panama Route," direct to Mobile 
Alabama, then transferred to the stean-.e; 
Peter H. Crowell. The steamer left 
Mobile November 6th via Panama Canal, 
arriving in San Francisco December 
14th. The shipment consisted entirely 
of plain and quarter sawed oak of ihc 
finest quality. 

The Eastern trade press s^avo much 
publicity to the event, lauding both ship- 
per and consignee upon their achieve- 
ment in sending the first entire trainload 
of hardwood lumber via the Panama 
Canal. 

White Brothers have ranother fine ship- 
ment of hardwood due to arrive early in 
January on the steamer Montoso. loaded 
with thousands of feet of mahogany, 
Jenezero veneers and high-grade lignum 
vitae of extra size. The mahogany is 
genuine Honduras, sawed and dried in 
Long Island City. This is also a Panama 
Canal shipment. The steamer Pleiades 
is also en route from New Orleans with 
a large consignment of red Southern 
gum and white oak. 

Quite a comprehensive idea of the va- 
riety and extent of the hardwood lumber 
carried by this firm can be obtained from 
a glance at their new Stock List No. 17, 
just puhlished. Over a half hundred dif- 
ferent varieties of hardwoods are listed, 
covering the well known floorings, ve- 
neers and finishes, also woods for ship 
builders, blacksmiths, carriage builders, 
etc. 

Not having seen this list, one would 
never believe that such a quantity and 
variety of hardwood lumber was stocked 
by one single firm on the entire Coast. 



Australian Parliament House Competition 

An architectural competition for the 
Australian Parliament House, on the site 
of the new Federal Capitol of .Australia, 
has been announced. Designs must be 
delivered in London or in Australia by 
March 31, 1915. Prizes totaling iCOOO 
are offered, the first prize being £2000. 
The judges are: George T. Poole, of Aus- 
tralia; John James Burnet, of London 
and Glasgow; Victor Laloux, of Paris; 
Otto Wagner of Vienna; Louis H. Sulli- 
van, an American architect with offices 
in the Auditorium Tower, Chicago, 111. 



Mr. ARCHITECT 

The Owner 
The Contractor 
The Building Manager 
The Elevator Men 
The Tenants 

All Thank You 

when you insist that 

RELIANCE 

HANGERS be used on all 
elevator doors. 



Reliance Ball Bearing 
Door Hanger Co. 

30 East 42nd Street 
New York 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS: 

Sartorius Company San Francisco, Cal. 

Louis R. Bedell Los Angeles. Cal. 

D. E. Fryer & Co Seattle. Wash. 

Wm. N. O'Neil Co Vancouver. B. C. 



A. C. SCHINDLER. Pr.sident. CHAS. F. STAUFFACHER. Secretary 

THE FIINK «& SCHIINDUER CO. 

Manufacturers of INTERIOR WOODWORK AND FIXTURES 

BANK, OFFICE AND STORE FITTINGS 

SPECIAL FURNITURE 

218-22S THIRTEENTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Bet. Mission and Howard Sts. Telephones: Market 2251 Home M225I 



The Architect and Engineer 



127 



They All Call Him "The Captain" 

Robert Woolston Hunt Who Has Been in the Van in Steel Making for a Lifetime is One 
of the Country's Foremost Engineers 

By George H. Manlove. 
From the Iron Trade Review, May 7, 1914. 



"THE CAPTAIN", they call him, from 
I the telephone girl at the information 

(ksk in his office^ to the inspector at the 
or.t.rmost post of the great organization 
he has built up. 

Who? 

Why, Captain Robert Woolston Hunt, 
the head of Robert W. Hunt & Co., 
engineers. 

If you ask the Captain how he earned 
the title, he will tell you with pride he 
earned it in the war of the rebellion, when 
he served his country at the expense of 
his individual interests. 

But to his friends and employes he is 
captain of a regiment in the great army 
of soldiers of the common good, who are 
doing a work to make the world better and 
safer and more comfortable for us all. 

And the Captain is no martinet, ruling 
by fear and by violent means. Far from it. 
He is gentle and kindly, soft spoken as a 
woman and without a trace of hardness. 
But he exacts obedience, which his helpers 
are glad to give. 

"We all love the Captain," said one em- 
ploye, and the way the title is used is 
an earnest of the fact, for it sounds like 
a term of endearment for a lovable man, 
whose contact with steel and iron and 
concrete has left him free from their char- 
acteristics. 

When a skyscraper is to be built, or 
a bridge or a great steel plant, the services 
of the Captain mav be had to assure the 
builder the materials are all they should 
be and that they are erected according to 
the specifications laid down by the designer. 

With a trained corps of men who know 
steel and iron and concrete from the in- 
side out. as well as the processes to give 
it strength and other characteristics neces- 
sary to perform its work properly, the Cap- 
tain has nuiUiplied his own power of knowl- 
edge a hundred fold and placed it where 



it is available for any one's use. Material 
inspected by the Captain's workers has his 
guarantee and none is better. 

When the history of steel is written, the 
name of Robert W. Hunt will be linked 
with those of Bessemer, Siemens, Carnegie, 
Howe, Bradley. Stoughton and the rest, 
whose efTorts have been given to develop- 
ing the great industry. 

He was a pioneer in the use of a labora- 
tory for chemical analysis at a steel plant, 
he made the first steel rails produced in 
America on a commercial scale and built 
the first automatic rail mill tables ever 
used. 

He was born Dec. 9, 1838, in Fallsington, 
Buck Countv, Pa. His father. Dr. Robert 
.■\. Hunt, of Trenton, N. J., was a graduate 
of Princeton college, and the University of 
Pennsylvania. His mother was Martha 
Lancaster Woolston. 

He soent several years learning the prac- 
tical side of iron-making in the rolling mills 
of John Burni'h & Co., Pottsville, Pa., and 
later took a course in analvtical chemistry 
in the laboratory of Booth, Garrett & Blair, 
upon the completion of which he entered 
the employ of the Cambria Iron Co., Johns- 
town. Pa., and Aug. 1, 1860, established 
for them the first laboratory in America 
as a direct oart of an iron or steel organi- 
zation. 

In the fall of 1861. he entered the L'nited 
States militarv service and was placed in 
command of Canin Curtin. Harrisbnrg, Pa. 
He served as mustering officer for the state 
of Pennsylvania, with the rank of captain 
and in 1864 assisted in recruiting Lambert's 
Independent Mounted Company, P. V. He 
was mustered into the United Slates service 
as a sergeant, having tos=ed up with a 
friend, who had a'so participated in re- 
cruiting the coniDany, as to which one 
should receive a lieutenant's commission. 



ROBERT W. HUNT 



JNO. J. CONE 



JAS. C. HALLSTED 



D. W. MCNAUGHER 



ROBERT W. HUNT & CO., Engineers 

BUREAU OF INSPECTION TESTS AND CONSULTATION 

251 KEARNY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



London Chica 



Pittsburgh St. Lour 



Seattle Toronto Me 



CEMENT INSPECTION 

INSPECTION OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL 

REPORTS AND ESTIMATES ON PROPERTIES AND PROCESSES 

CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL TESTING LABORATORIES 



riting to -\dverti5ers please mentii 



128 



The Architect and Engineer 



Even Old Boreas 
Gives It Up! 



^A^^ 



. ^r^- 



Our Roofing Tin proves its 
true worth when tested by 
storm. Old Boreas, travel- 
ing through space at sixty 
miles an hour, is prone to 
sweep every roof in his path 
unless it is made of 

Copper Bearing Open Hearth 

m*^%ROOFING TIN 



manufactured exclusively by 
this Company. Sendforbook- 
let "Copper — Its Effect Upon 
'steel for Rooting- Tin." 
Every architect, roofer and 
builder should read it. 



Copper Bearing Open Hearth Roofing Tin bears the stamp "C. B. Open 
Hearth" in addition to brand and weight of coating. We also manu- 
facture Keystone Copper Bearing Sheets, both Black and Galvanized. 



American Slieet MlinPyeCoiKDaw 

■^ General Oflficcs: TrickBuadii\g.Ktt6buigh,Pa. 



District Sales Offices 



When writing to Advertisers pie 



The Architect and Engineer 



129 



Upon being mustered out of service, he 
returned to the employ of the Cambria 
Iron Co.. and was sent by them to the 
experimental Bessemer works at Wyan- 
dotte, Mich., of which it was part owner. 
He was placed in charge of those works 
in July 1865, and so continued until May, 
1866, when the Cambria company called him 
back to Johnstown to take charge of its 
steel business, as they intended to begin 
at once the erection of a Bessemer steel 
plant. This was not done for several years, 
and in the meantime, the Cambria company 
undertook the rolling of steel rails for the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Co. from ingots pro- 
duced by the Pennsylvania Steel Co.'s works 
at Steekon, Pa., that company's rail mill 
not being completed. Mr. Hunt had charge 
of the steel for this operation, and these 
were said to be the first steel rails made 
in America on a commercial order. 

Later he assisted George Fritz, Cambria's 
chief engineer, in designing and building 
their Bessemer works, and assumed charge 
of it on its completion. July 10. 1871. con- 
tinuing until .\ugust. 1873. when he re- 
signed his position. September 1. 1873, he 
entered upon the duties of superintendent 
of the Bessemer works of John A. Griswold 
& Co., Troy. X. Y. In March, 1875. he be- 
came general superintendent of the Albany 
& Rensselaer Iron & Steel Co., which had 
acquired the works of John A. Griswold 
& Co. and Erastus Corning & Co. This 
organization became later the Troy Steel 
& Iron Co. He remained in charge until 
1888. During those years he almost com- 
pletely rebuilt the various works of the 
company, and also erected a large blast fur- 
nace plant of the most complete character. 

Mr. Hunt has taken out several letters 
patent on steel and iron metallurgical pro- 
cesses and machinery, both invidually and 
in conjunction with John E. Fr\-, \Vm. R. 
Jones, Dr. August Wendel and Max M. 
Suppes. Mr. Hunt put in the first auto- 
matic rail mill tables, and later the Hunt- 
Jones-Supoes rail mill feed tables were used 
under licenses by the majority of the rail 
mills in the United States. On Dec. 5, 
1866. he was united in marriage to Miss 
Eleanor Clark, of Ecourse. Mich. 

In April. 1888. he established the bureau 
of inspection, tests and consultation of 
Robert W. Hunt & Co., with principal 
offices in Chicago, 111., to which city he 
removed in the spring of 1888. He served 
three terms as commander of John A. Gris- 
wold Post Xo. 338 G. A. R., of Troy, from 
which position he resigned on removing 
from that city. 

Mr. Hunt is a member of the American 
Institute of Alining Engineers, and was 
president in 1883 and again in 1906. He 
is a member of the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers, and was president 
in 1890. He is a member of the Western 
Society of Engineers, and was president 
in 1893. He is also a member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Civil Engineers, Canadian 



Society of Civil Engineers, The Institution 
of Civil Engineers, the Institution of Me- 
chanical Engineers, and the Iron and Steel 
Institute of England. He is a member 
of the American Society for Testing Ma- 
terials, and was president in 1912. He is 
the American member of the Council of 
the International Association for Testing 
Materials. 

In 1912, by the John Fritz medal commit- 
tee, representing the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, American Institute of ^Iin- 
ing Engineers American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers and the American Institute 
of Electrical Engineers, he was awarded 
the Tohn Fritz medal, "for his contributions 
to the early development of the Bessemer 
process." 

Mr. Hunt has contributed many papers 
to the proceedings of the several societies, 
of which he is a member, and frequently 
lectures before scientific bodies. He is and 
has been for many years a trustee of the 
Renssalaer Polvtechnic Institute, Trov. X. 
Y. 

Mr. Hunt is a member of the Chicago 
Engineers, Mid-Day. Saddle and Cycle, 
Chicago, South Shore, Illinois Athletic, Glen 
View, Chicago Golf. Winnetka County, 
Montreal Engineers. Engineers of Xew 
York and Mexico City Country clubs. He 
has always been interested in out-of-door 
sports, and was. in his earlier life, a cricket 
and baseball player, and is now an enthusi- 
astic golfer. 



Manual Training and 
Domestic Science 
Furniture and Equipment 

Agents for 

The Well-known SHELDON Line 

Laboratory Furniture 
School Desks and Supplies 
Manuf acturers of th e cele- 
brated ^^^^QB Black- 
board 

C. F. Weber & Co. 



365 Market St.. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



512 So. Broadway 
LOS ANGELES 



130 The Architect and EnHncer 



HEATING Automatic Sprinkler Systems plumbing 

VENTILATION FLOOR AND WALL TILING sheet metal work 

SCOTT CO., Inc. 

Successor to JOHN G. SUTTON CO. 
243 MINNA STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



O. BAMANN. President ERNEST HELD, Vice-President 

HOME MANUFACTURING CO. 

BANK, STORE AND OFFICE FITTINGS 

FURNITURE AND HARDWOOD INTERIORS 

CABINET WORK OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

543 and 545 BRANNAN ST. phone Keamy 1514 San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC GURNEY ELEVATOR CO. 

GURNEY TYPE TRACTION ELEVATORS 

All Types Double and Single Worm Qear Freight and Passenger Elevators 

186 Fifth Street San Francisco, Cal. 



Office, Builders E ;ch inge, Phone Sutter 6700 Office, Gen. Conts. Assn., Phone Sutter 3S80 

J. J. COININOLUY «& SOIN 

COiNTRACTIINO PUASTERERS 

CEMENT WORK A SPECIALTY. ESTIMATES FURNISHED 
ON ALL KINDS OF PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL PLASTERING 

BUILDERS EXCHANGE 180 Jessie Street SAN FRANCISCO 



PHONE SUTTER 1511 












FOSTER 


VOGT 


CO. 






Contractors 






CONCRETE FIRE PROOFINC AND GENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 




Sharon Building 






San Francisco, 


Cal. 



FREDERICK J. AMWEG ^'^''^"' ^"""'o.t^^-^.r'" °' '''"'""' 

CIVIL ENGINEER 

Member American Soc. Civil Eng. j^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ j^^ FranCiSCO, Cal. 



SAMUEL J. TAYLOR, Jr. 
Res. Phone Piedmont 7JS0 


HERBERT D. McKIBBEN 
Res. Phone Piedmont 4847 


AlcKIBBEIN <S: 


TAVUOR 


CEMEINT and COINCRETE 


COINTRACTORS 


Berkeley, 2125 SHATTUCK AVENUE 
Phone Berkeley 44 


Oakland, BUILDERS EXCHANGE 
Phone Oakland 790 



SLIDING DOOR HANGERS 

FOR ALL CONDITIONS 
THE McCABE HANGER MANUFACTURING CO., NEW YORK 



The Architect and Engineer 



131 




Multi-Stage Turbine House Pump 
General Offices and Factory 

CHICAGO PUMP COMPANY 

901 W. Lake Street, Chicago, III. 



Specify "Chicago" 

Multi-stage Turbine House Puirps 
Single & Duplex Electric Sewage Ejectors 
Automatic Electric Bilge Pumps 
"Little Ciant" Electric Cellar Drainers 
Pneumatic Water Supply Systems 
Electric House Service Pumps 
A COMPLETE AND WELL DESIGNED LINE 
Pacific Coast Agents 

TELEPHONE ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT CO. 

612 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Important Metal Furniture Contract 

The contract for metal roller book- 
shelves for the County Auditor's office 
of Alameda county was awarded recently 
to the Capitol Sheet Metal Works in 
competition with several large metal fur- 
niture concerns. 

This iirm, which operates factories 
both in Oakland and San Francisco, was 
particularly pleased with the Oakland 
contract, as it indicated a distinct prefer- 
ence on the part of the ,\lameda county 
Supervisors for home industry. Labor, 
as represented by the cross-bay trade 
unions, was also pleased with the award. 

It is a surprising fact that more than 
$200,000 is spent annually by California 
public officials for metal furniture, and it 
is the intention of the Capitol Sheet 
Metal Works to reach out for a goodly 
proportion of this business. 

For years the firm has been a factor 
in all lines of regular sheet metal work, 
including skylights, metal doors and win- 
dows with the Underwriters' label, intri- 
cate cornice work, etc., and its installa- 
tions have all been of a creditable nature. 



For the Sanitary Kitchen 

Something new in kitchen equipment 
has recently been placed on the market 
by the Improved Sanitary Fixture Com- 
pany of 411 South Los .-Xngeles street, 
Los Angeles. It is called the "Help- 
Her" improved sanitary kitchen sink 
and is exactly what the name implies. 
It is a. refuse separator placed in the 
bottom of the kitchen sink, all porcelain 
enameled, with removable nickel-plated 
receptacle and strainer. The removable 
receptacle, out of the way, yet right at 
hand, without steps or stooping, receives 
all refuse and washings, traps and con- 
geals grease and retains solids. It per- 
mits water, and water only, co pass into 
the drain-pipe. Pots, pans and dishes 
from the table with leavings thereon, arc 
drenched with hot water under the 
faucet, without soiling or scalding the 
hands, scraping .or scattering waste 
materials. 



The B. & W. Stationary 
Vacuum Cleaner 

For Bungalows and Moderate Sized Houses 
PRICE $100.00 INSTALLED 



High efficiency and costs less than 3c per hour 
to operate. Made in San Francisco. 

For demonstration see 

ARTHUR T. RIGQS 

510 Claus Spreckels BIdg., San Francisco 

PHONE G.\RFIELD 7189 



MacKenzie Roof Co. 



Ht^i^favelf 



4-25 15tH St., OaKland 

Phone OaKland 34^61 



W.W.BREITE,C.E. 

Structural Engineer 

Designs and Details of 
ALL CLASSES OF 

METALLIC STRUCTURES 



FOURTH FLOOR, CLUNIE BLDQ. 
California and Montgomery Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



riting to Advertisers please mention this magaz 



132 



The Architect and Engineer 



Dahlstrom Company Keeps Up Its 
Enterprise 

The portfolio of details of Hollow- 
Metal Construction which the Dahlstrom 
Metallic Door Company distributed the 
past year to architects and others inter- 
ested, has met with unqualified approval 
and appreciation by all who have seen it. 

Six new plates have recently been is- 
sued and copies may be had on applica- 
tion. In a personal letter to architects 
the company says: 

"In view of our experience and knowl- 
edge of work installed we have no hesi- 
tation in asserting that the right kind 
of hollow-metal doors and trim m the 
buildings erected under your care and 
supervision will prove one of the most 
appreciated parts of the equipment you 
could use. and will surely reflect credit 
on the architect specifying and insisting 
on the use of Dahlstrom products. 

"If parties interested in building equip- 
ment thoroughly appreciated the differ- 
ence in quality of workmanship, con- 
struction and finish of hollow-metal 
work, the reason why we do not com- 
pete in prices would be obvious. We 
do claim, and our assertions have never 
been disputed, that we furnish the best 
quality of goods that can be produced, 
and feel that architects and clients who 
appreciate that the best is the cheapest 
in the long run are willing topay a fan- 
price for this grade of goods." 

Gas from Ruud Heater Causes Serious 
Explosion 

A press dispatch from Santa Rosa says 
that William H. Upton had a narrow 
escape from serious injury or perhaps 
death when a quantity of gas which had 
accumulated beneath a Ruud hot water 
heater, exploded, and the entire heater 
was wrecked. The article goes on to 
say: 

In the meter room was an immense gas heater 
of the Rund make, with which the apartments 
were kept supplied with hot water. In some man- 
ner gas had accumulated beneath and around the 
heater, and when Mr. Upton struck a match the 
explosion followed. The detonation could Ul- 
heard for many blocks. The force of the explo- 
sion sprung the entire front of the machine, hurst 
the front and rear doors, cracked the heavy case 
of the heater frame, burst the metal coil inside, 
and blew out windows in the Demmcr building 
adjoining. 

California Building Material Company in 
New Offices 

The California Building :\Iaterial Com- 
pany, one of the first San Francisco con- 
cerns to put upon the market a clean, 
washed gravel for concrete inix, has 
moved its general offices from the Pacific 
building to Rooms 500 to 504, New Call 
building. This company's plant is at 
Niles, California. Crushed rock and 
gravel are shipped from here to points m 
California as far south as Fresno and as 
far north as Sacramento. The company re- 
tains its old phone number, Sutter 4845. 



;^i.r^^ 




COLLINS 

PRONG 

STUDDING 



FEDERAL or FLATIRON BUILDING, 

OAKLAND 

Ben G. McDougall. Architect 



scd for 




in this build- 
ing. 

A Wonder- 
ful LABOR 
SAVING De- 
vice. Simply 
BEND the 
Prong and the 
Lath is Se- 
curely Tied. 




320 California 
Street 

SAN rRANCISCO 



SEATTLE 
TACOMA 
SPOKANE 
PORTLAND 
LOS ANGELES 
SAN DIEGO 



When writing to Advertisers pleiise mention thi 



The Architect and Engineer 



133 



TUEC at the Exposition 




THIS PICTURE SHOWS THE 

CANADIAN BUILDING 



PANAMA- PACIFIC EXPOSITION 

It is considered one of the Best 
Architectural Efforts at the Fair. 

EQUIPPED WITH A 

TUEC 

VACUUM CLEANER 



The United Electric Co. 

CANTON, OHIO 

110 Jessie Street, San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



134 



The Architect and Engineer 




GIANT MODEL "A" 



OAKLAND 

3rd and Jefferson Streets 

D^„„„ \ Oakland 137-1 
Phones ^ LAKJ-SJJ3E ^7 




[HIS machine, known as our 
Model "A" medium or high 
vacuum, handles a great vol- 
ume of air on small H. P. 
Manufactured in Oakland. 
Winner of Gold Medal at State 
Fair, 1913, against all competitive vacuum 
cleaners. The Judges were members of the 
California State Engineering Department. 
This machine embodies the vacuum cleaner 
process and can be instantly converted into 
a powerful compressor. Estimates cheerfully 
furnished to architects, contractors and build- 
ers. Hundreds of our machines in operation. 




Suction Cle.iuer Coiiip;in5' 

SAN FRANCISCO 
731-733 Folsom Street 

Phone Kearny 26S4 



Overland Limited 

Extra Fare $10 First-Class Tickets Only 

ODGDEN ROUTE 

Chicago in 63>2 Hours 

From San Francisco, Ferry Station 4:00 P. M. 
From Oakland, 16th St, Station 4:30 P. M. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 135 



Phone Sutter 1687 

Everything in TILE 

CALIFORNIA TILE 
CONTRACTING CO. 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

461 Market St., 206 Sheldon Bldg. SAN FRANCISCO 



A. PINNER, Pres. A. M. McLELLAN, Sec'y=Treas. 

Western Building & Engineering Company, Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

OFFICE 

455 Phelan Building San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Garfield 7564 



Member Builders' Exchange Residence 2<)09 California Street 

180 Jessie Street Telephone Fillmore 1427 

Telephone Sutter 6700 

C C. MOREHOUSE 

Plain and Ornamental PLASTERING. Imitation STONE WORK of All Kinds 
Exterior CEMENT PLASTERING. Metal FURRING and LATHING 
MODELING and CASTING. STUCCO WORK 

Office and Shop: 872 FOLSOM ST., San Francisco 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 6509 



SELF-WINDING CLOCKS 

PROGRAM CLOCK SYSTEMS 
TOWER CLOCKS 



Decker Electrical Construction Company 

111 New Montgomery' Street, San Francisco 
AGENTS, SELF WINDING CLOCK COMPANY NEW YORK 

When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



136 The Architect and Engineer 



SPECIFY 




Green Label Varnishes 

and 

Advanced Finishes 

for all modern Building Construction, and then rest assured that 
you have specified the best that modem Science can produce. 
Made by the largest varnish factory in the world, and with a 
reputation of over fifty years as the Standards, they may be de- 
pended upon to be 

ALWAYS UNIFORM IN QUALITY 

and that they are manufactured by the most modem facilities and 

BEST SUIT THE PURPOSES 

for which paint and varnish Science has chosen them. 

GET ACQUAINTED WITH 
GLIDDEN 

by mailing a postal to the California Distributors, when you shall 
receive a full set of handsomely finished samples of Glidden Green 
Label Varnishes and Cement and Concrete Finishes, etc. 

WHITTIER-COBURN CO. 

301 Howard Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 



137 





A. S. MANGRUM, PnES. ONO MGR. CHAS. C. HANLEY, Secy and Treas 

MANGRUM & OTTER 

(INCORPORATED) 






TILING MANTELS 
GRATES 




FU RN ACE AN D 
STEAM HEATING 






HOTEL AND KITCHEN OUTFITS 

Stoves, Ranues. Ketritrerators. Tin and Enameled Ware 

Telephone. Kearny 3155 561-563 Mission St., San Francisco 





AERO-GAS is 50 Per Cent CHEAPER Than City Gas 

Aero-Gas is Best for Cooking, Heating and Illuminating 
of country houses, factories, public buildings, schools, 
churches, etc. Made from ordinary Motor Gasoline — non- 
poisonous, non-odorous, non-explosive — can be used when 
city gas is not obtainable, or can be substituted for city gas 
without changing piping, ranges, heaters, or lighting fix- 
tures. Architects should investigate. Circulars free. 

THE UTILITY GAS GENERATOR CO. 

PHONES: DOUGL.\S 2400 G.-\RFIELD 7937 

340 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




>^- 




HAWS SANITARY 
Drinking Fountains 

are used today in the best State, County and Municipal 
Buildings on the Pacific Coast. Also in Schools. Theaters, 
Lodge Rooms. Parks. Depots, etc. 

Do You Want the Best.' Specify HAWS. 

Send for Catalogue 

Haws Sanitary Drinking Faucet Co. 

1808 Harmon Street, BERKELEY, CAL. 

G. F. WEBER CO. 

San Francisco and Los Angeles 



GRAVITY SPIRAL CHUTE 

Economical Method of Lowering Boxes, Package Goods and Merchandise 

M.M'E EV 

MINNESOTA MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 

Manufacturers cif Spirals, Automatic Siraiglu-Lift Eleva- 
tors, Gravity Freight Conveyors and Power Conveyors. 
Engineers and Designers of Labor-Saving Conveying 
Systems. 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 

602 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 

TELEPHONE SUTTER 678 




When writing to Adyerti; 



138 



The Architect and En<;ineer 




O. S. S A R S I 

ArcHitectviral Sculptor 

^ High Class Ornamenlal Plaster. Ornamenlal Concrete 
Stone for Front of Buildings, Makers of Garden Furni- 
ture in Pompeiian Stone. Ums.Vases. Seats. Monuments, 
Caen Stone Mantel Preces. Telephone Market 2970. 

123 OAK STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone FranliUn 1006 



Alex. Coleman 

CONTRACTING 
PLUMBER 



706 Ellis Street, San Francisco, Cat. 



Phone Lakeside 




Ees. Phone 


2000 




Merritt 3485 


ROBERT 


SWAN 


Member of 


Builders' Exchange 


Painter 


and Decorator 




^ 




110 Jessie St. 




SAN FEANCISCO 


1133 East Twelfth St. 


OAKLAND, CAL. 



McCRAY 
REFRIGERATORS 

BUILT TO ORDER 

FOR 
Home, Restaurant, Hotel or Club 

We Carry a Full Line of Stock Sizes 

NATHAN DOHRMANN CO. 

Selling Agents 
Geary and Stockton Sts., San Francisco 



PETERSEN-JAMES CO. 



PLUMBING 
HEATING 

CONTRACTORS 



710 Larkin St., San Francisco 

Telephones, Franklin 3540-C2443 




G. ROGNIER CEl CO. 

La\vn ana Garden Ornaments 

Artificial Stone Work. 

Benches, Vases. Sun Dials, etc. 

Designs SuhmiKcd 

233 Railroad Ave., SAN MATEO, CAL 



PLUMBERS' MARBLE HARDWARE 

Suggestion.s 

Angle-Clamps, Railing and Standards, 
Reversible Spring Hinges, Locks, Vent 
Plates. 

BUILDERS' Hardware Specialties 

including 
Cremorne Bolts, Casement Adjusters and 
Fasteners, Front Door Escutcheons, 
Sash Lifts. Lodge Room Door Wickets. 

WESTERN BRASS MF6, GO, 



H.H. WINNER COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 

COMPLETE BANK INTERIORS 
OF THE HIGHER GLASS 

Office: NEVADA BANK BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



riting to Adverti; 



Tin- Architect and Engineer 



139 



"STEELCRETE" for Labor Temple 

HIS Splendid Building 
just being completed 
and which will house 
"" the various Labor organiza- 
tions of San Francisco is sup- 
plied throughout with 




"STEELCRETE" 

EXPANDED METAL 
LATH PARTITIONS. 



SA.N h'l:.\.\l|t 



L.M'.i il; ■rK.MI'L 



JIalliew O'Brien, Architect 



Furnished and Installed liy 



HOLLOWAY EXPANDED METAL CO. 



Contractors for FURRING and LATHING 



776 Monadnock Building 



San Francisco, Cal. 



WHETHER FOR EXTERIOR 
OR INTERIOR TRIM 

It is wise to specify such brands as are known the world over, and give 
the greatest satisfaction. 

For more than forty years we have been successful makers of high 
grade varnishes, enamels, stains, etc. and our brands have withstood the 
severest tests. 

They have been used on some of the most important buildings, and 
have alwavs given unbounded satisfaction. 

Spccifv ELASTIC A FLOOR FINISH, the perfect floor varnish, 
SATINETTE, The WHITE White Enamel, and KLEARTONE 
STAINS — (-)il and Acid, Permanent and Beautiful Shades. 

New York Berlin Chicac;o Paris London Melbourne 

113 Front Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

It will be well worth your while to visit our very beautiful and interesting exhibit 
at the PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION, in the Mines and Metallurgy Building, 
Section 14. 



140 



The Architect and Eiii^incer 



ELECTRICAL ILLUMINATING 



MECHANICAL 



CHARLES T. PHILLIPS 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

PACIFIC BLDG., SAN FRANCISCO 

PLANS SPECIFICATIONS REPORTS 

The Economical Production, Distribution and Application of Light, Power, 
Heat and Ventilation. Illumination Efficiency. Physical Reports. Electrol- 
ysis Investigations. Estimates and Tests. 



STEEL BARS for Concrete REINFORCEMENT 

WE CARRY A COMPLETE STOCK OF 

TWISTED SQUARES, PLAIN SQUARES AND ROUNDS 



WOODS & HUDDART 



444 MARKET STREET 



Tel. Sutter 2720 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



OIL BURNERS 

VACUUM PLANTS 
ICE MACHINES 

The Three Essentials for the Up-to-date 
HOTEL and APARTMENT HOUSE. 

With a JARVIS Guarantee Your Troubles Are Over. 
Home Manufacture — Everything but the motors 

T. P. JARVIS CRUDE OIL BURNING COMPANY 

Phone Market 3397 275 Connecticut Street, SAN FRANCISCO 




BOISE SANDSTONE 

Everlasting Fast-Cutting Fireproof 

Of Beautiful Color Inexpensive Strong j 

What more could be said of Perfect Stone • 

BOISE STONE COMPANY 

BOISE. IDAHO Cut by all Stone Contractors on the Pacific Coast 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Ens.incer 141 



THE INVINCIBLE VACUUM CLEANERS 

COMPRISE THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE LINE OF VACUUM 
CLEANING MACHINERY ON THE MARKET. THEY ALSO STAND 
FIRST IN SIMPLICITY, EFFICIENCY AND DURABILITY 

A complete list of installations will be furnished any inquirer 
We have never had a failure or an unsatisfactorj' installation 

R. W. FOYLE, General Agent 

149 New Montgomery St. :: :: San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Sutter 2401 

WILLIAMS BROS. & HENDERSON 



E. F. Henderson W. M. Williams Chas. Williams 



BUILDING CONTRACTORS 

Room 447 
HOLBROOK BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



F. E. KNOWLES, President Telephone Market 688 ABEL HOSMER, Secretary 

RAYMOND GRANITE COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

CONTRACTORS FOR STONE WORK 

of ev'ery description 
DEALERS IN DIMENSION STONE 

Main Office and Yard Proprietors of 

Potrero Ave. and Division Sts. RAYMOND GRANITE QUARRY 

SAN FRANCISCO Raymond, Madera Co., Cal. 



PHONE CONNECTION 

JOHN MONK 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Residence, 2016 VALLEJO ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

Wh*n writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



142 



The Arcliitcct and Engineer 



Top Lig^ht Shades Used Here 




ARMIJO UNION HIGH SCHOOL, FAIRFIELD. CALIFORNIA^ HENRY C SMITH, .\rrl„t, , l 

ALL WINDOWS EQUIPPED WITH 

TOP LIGHT SHADES 

A Simple Adjustable Window Shade — Non-Breakable — All Metal but the Shade Cloth. 
An Ornament to any Window. Suitable for any Building or Residence. Made of Cold 
Pressed Steel Plated to Match Wood Work. Write for illustrated descriptive booklet. 

TOP LIGHT SHADE COMPANY 

Offii c, 737 Market St., Oakland, Gal. Factory, 720-724 Market St., Oakland, Cal 




PACIFIC SERVICE 



LIGHT HEAT POWER 



Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 

445 SUTTER STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC PHONE 

Sutter UO 



HOME PHONE 

C 0011 



to Advertisers please mention thi^ 



The Architect and Ens'inccr 143 



Phone Douglas 2370 

McLERAN & PETERSON 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

SHARON BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



R. W. MOLLER 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Phone Sutter 5228 185 Stevenson Street, San Francisco 



W. L. KELLEV O. Q. HOAAS 

P. A. PALMER 

Contracting Engineer 

625-627 Monadnock Building SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



COMPENSATION INSURANCE SURETY BONDS 

H. V. MAC MEANS & COMPANY 

341 MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Phones, Sutter 1871—1872 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Factory Phone, 2629.J Office Phone, 2770-J 

Granite Press Brick Co. 

L. C. BRINKMEYER, President and Manager 

431 OCHSNER BUILDING SACRAMENTO, CAL. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 

FIDELITY AND DEPOSIT COMPANY OF MARYLAND 

Bonds and Casualty Insurance for Contractors 

Insurance Exchange BIdg. Phones ^ S ''*^^ ,.st 

SAN FRANCISCO ' Kearny 1452 



TELEPHONE SUTTER 2389 

WILLIAM H. FERGUSON 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER 
and QUANTITY SURVEYOR 

1107 CROCKER BUILDING - . - - SAN FRANCISCO 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

of San Francisco 

MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BUILDING 

Surety Bonds, Liability Insurance The Only California Surety Company 



144 



The Architect and Engineer 



UNITED STATES 
STEEL PRODUCTS CO. 

RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO 

SELLERS OF THE PRODUCTS OF 



American Steel and 

Wire Co. 
American Bridg-e Co. 
American Sheet and 

Tin Plate Co. 
Carnegie Steel Co. 
Illinois Steel Co. 



National Tube Co. 
Lorain Steel Co. 
Shelby Steel Tube Co. 
Tennessee Coal, Iron 

and Railroad Co. 
Trenton Iron Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Structural Steel for Every Purpose. 
Bridges, Railway and Highway. 

"Triangle Mesh" Wire Concrete Reinforcement. 
Plain and Twisted Reinforcing Bars. 

Plates, Shapes and Sheets of Every Description. 
Rails, Splice Bars, Bolts, Nuts, etc. 
Wrought Pipe, Valves, Fittings, Trolley Poles. 

Frogs, Switches and Crossings for Steam Railway and Street Railway. 
"Shelby" Seamless Boiler Tubes and Mechanical Tubing. 

"Americore" and "Globe" Rubber Covered Wire and Cables. 
"Reliance" \yeatherproof Copper and Iron Line Wire. 
"American" Wire Rope, Rail Bonds, Springs, 
Woven Wire Fencing and Poultry Netting. 
Tramways, etc. 

United States Steel Products Co. 



OFFICES 



WAREHOUSES 



San Francisco - Los Angeles - Portland - Seattle 



riting to Advertisers please mentic 



TJic Architect and Engineer 



145 



A HeatingContrac- i 




What about the 


tor recently stated 




Owner's troxibles 


that what he saved 


m 


after the work is 


in cost of cheap 


accepted? This 


Radiator Valves 




can be avoided by 


was lost in extra 




specifying "Genu- 


labor in getting the 




31 ine Jenkins 


Valves tight before 


Sw BROS, l^adiator 


work was accepted. 


kiks^^P 


Valves." 


JENKINS 


BROS. 


247 Mission Street 




300 West Lake Stree 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




CHICAGO, ILL. 




BURLINGTON V[N[TIAN BLINDS 

will make your porch a shady, airy summer 
resort with such perfect privacy that you can 
eat. sleep and live in the health-giving open 
air. The upper slats can be adjusted to admit 
light, while the lower slats are closed to shut 
out sun and gaze of passers-b". Easily 
lowered and raised. 

When you install Burlington Venetian 
Blinds, you will need Burlington "First Qual- 
ity" Window Screens (inside and outside) 
and Screen Doors with Rust-proof Wire Cloth. 

Burlington Patent Inside Sliding Blinds 
take the place of old-style folding blinds. 

BURLINGTON VENETIAN BLIND 
CO., 333 Lake Street, Burlington, Vt. 

C. F. WEBER & CO. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 



As Good as a Vacation 1 



LINOTILE 



THE NEW CORK COMPOSITION FLOORING 

Manufactured by 

ARMSTRONG CORK & INSULATION CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Non-slippery, vSuitablc for grill rooms, hotel lobbies, billiard rooms, 

sanitary, durable, ^^^ galleries, libraries, steamer cabins and decks, hospi- 

mode^rjfte cost. ^als, schools, kitchens, elevators, churches, banks, etc. 

Plione or write for samples. 

M. C. VAN FLEET 



Telephone Douglas 1227 



120 Jessie Street, San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



146 



TJie Arcliifcct and Engineer 



E5TABI-ISHEI> 1865 C. 11, Franklin, Mar. & Any. 

TnEfRANKfORTG[N[RALINSURANCECO. 

OF FRANKFORT-ON -THE-MAIN, GERMANY 

Liability 

Workmen's Collective 

Workmen's Compensation 
Burglary 
Personal Accident and Health 
Industrial Accident and Health 
WALTER A. CHOWEN. Pacific Coast General Agent 
340 Sansome Street, San Francisco 
Central California Agency Southern California Agency 
eEN LEONARD COMPANV CONSOLIDATED AGEKCV COMPANy 
617 "J" St,,, Sacramento 334 Central Bldg., Los Angeles 




WINDOW CO. 

No Weights — No Cords 
Manufactured in Wood 
and Metal Stock Lip 
Sashes used 
Simple frame construction 
reducing cost. Guaranteed 
rain and dust proof. In- 
stalled easily. Visit our 
office and inspect them 
Omce, 226 Balboa Bldg. 
Second and Market Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Fresno Art 
Glass Company 

JOHN YDREN, Prop. 

&tRT. LEADED S^N'D 
"PRISM GLASS WORK 

Estimates Furnished Anywhere 
in SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY. 

2124 Tuolumne St. Fresno, Gal. 



Mount Diablo Cement 
Cowell Santa Cruz Lime 

ALL KINDS OF 

BUILDING 
MATERIALS 

Henry Cowcli Lime & Cement Co. 

No. 2 Market St., San Francisco 
Phone Kearny 2095 



A.J. FORBES & SON 

Established in San Francisco in 1850 

Office and Factory, 1530 FILBERT ST., S, F. 

Builders E.x. Box 236 

Bank, Store and OflSce 
Fittings 

Special Furniture and 
Interior Woodwork 



J.M. BOSCUS 

Plumbing 
Heating 



Phone 
Douglas 669 



975 HOWARD ST. 
San Francisco 



Phone S. Jose 955 



W. H. OTTO 

CONCRETE 
CONTRACTOR 

Heavy Foundations and Bridges 

A Specialty. Anywhere in 

Northern California 

269 PARK AVE. SAN JOSE, CAL. 



Phone Sutter 2593 

RALSTON IRON 
WORKS INC. 

VAULT and PRISON DEPARTMENT 

CHAS. M. FINCH. MGR. 

Plans and Estimates to 
Architects on request 

444 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Ens'inccr 



147 



LATH, SHINGLES, SHAKES and POSTS, SASH, DOORS and MILL WORK 
TIMBERS and SPECIALS KILN DRIED FINISH and FLOORING 

SUNSET LUMBER COMPANY 

DEALERS WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL IX 

PINE and REDWOOD LUMBER 



PHONE OAKLAND 1820 



YARDS AND OFFICE 

OAK AND FIRST STS., OAKLAND, CAL. 



Large Timbers 

and Special 

Bills to Order 

Kiln Dried 

Oregon Pine 

Finish 



SANTA FE LUMBER COMPANY 

Dealers in Wholesale and Retail 

LUMBER 



Main Yard on SOUTHERN PACIFIC. WESTERN PACIFIC, SANTA FE 
17th and De Haro Streets .-. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Mill work Manufactured 

and Delivered Anywhere 

Plans or Lists sent us for Estimates will 
have Careful and Immediate Attention 

DUDFIELD LUMBER CO. 

Main Office, Yard and Planing Mill = PALO ALTO 

JNO. DUDFIELD, President and Manager JOSEPH A. JURY, Secretarj' and Mill Supt. 




Meurer Bros. Co. 

METAL SPANISH TILE 

TIFFANY Pattern. A perfect and hand- 
some Roof Covering. The only tile that 
gives the effect of Lights and Shadows. 
'Tis absolutely water-tight. Used on all 
the schools in San Jose. 

A. H. McDonald, Pac. coast Mgr. 

Office and Warehouse: 
630 Third Street - - San Francisco. Ca3. 



riting to Adv 



please mention this magaz 



148 



The Architect and Engineer 




^J{^/r£:n/E^:^ 



UNFAILING in its operation the 
Prometheus Food and Plate Warmer has 
become the dependable one — the one 
demanded by the painstaking chef. 

Properly constructed, it keeps food 
warm without crusting or the loss of its 
first flavor. 

Prometheus — THE plate warmer — 
Electric, fif course. 

M. E. Hammond 

217 Humboldt Bank Bldg. 
Phone Douglas 319 

SAN FRANCISCO - CAL. 



Correct Modelii 



Accurate Cha 



A. FAZEKAS & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

American Art in 
Bronze and Iron 

Church and Cemetery 
Bronze Work a Specialty 

We manufacture the following: 

Sculptured Bronze Entrance Doors, 
Cast Bronze and Iron Stair Railings, 
Mausoleum Doors, Crematory Urns, 
Statues and Figures, Cast Bronze Signs 
and Separate Letters, Memorial T£:b- 
lets, Bronze Tablets with Portrait, 
Medallions, Sun-dials, Fountains, Vases, 
Bronze and Iron Electric Light Stand- 
ards, Cast Bronze and Iron Lanterns, etc. 

13 GRACE STREET 

Between 9th and 10th. 
Mission and Howard 

Phone Market 1404 SAN FRANCISCO 




TH[fESSSYST[M 

Rotary Crude Oil Burners 

The original and still superior — 
winners of every contest 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 



SMOKELESS NOISELESS 



MONEY BACK IN FULL 
IF NOT SATISFACTORY 



FESS SYSTEM CO. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

OFFiCE .\ND factory: 

218 222 Natoma St., San Francisco 

Phone Sutter 927 



The Judson Manu- 
facturing Company 

announces to the trade 
that it IS NOW 
OPERATING an 

Open -Hearth Furnace 



and is in a position to fur- 
nish MILD STEEL BARS. 
SMALL ANGLES and 
UNIVERSAL PLATES 

in the same range of 
sizes as it has hereto- 
fore supplied in double 
refined Iron. 

Judson Manuevctiiring Co. 



When writing to Advertisers please mentis 



The Architect and EiiHneer 149 



Phone 

Franklin 

2318 



D. ZELINSKY 

PAINTER - DECORATOR 

564 Eddy St., SAN FRANCISCO 

F. J. W. ANDERSEN C. LARSEN 

PACiriC STRUCTURAL IRON WORKS 

STRUCTURAL IRON AND STEEL, FIRE ESCAPES, ETC. 



BENIN ETT BROS. 

Sargent's Building: Hardware 

514=516 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



AMERICAN CONCRETE CO. 

J.isFPH PasijL'ALKTTI, Manas;er 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

1704 HUMBOLDT BANK BUILDING 785 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

Globe Indemnity Company 

Bonds and Casualty Insurance for Contractors 

120 Leidesdorff street Phone Sutter 2280 SAN FRANCISCO 

CHRIS. TOTTEN Telephone Stockton 1770 

TOTTEN & BRANDT PLANING MILL CO. 

General Mill Work — Sash, Doors, Mouldings 

18-48 W. SCOTTS AVE., STOCKTON, CAL. P. O. Box 298 

Independent Sewer Pipe & Terra Cotta Co. 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 
GLAZED AND ENAMELED BRICK 
VITRIFIED SAL T G LAZ ED SEWER PIPE 
TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY PIPE & FLUE LINING 

235 South Los Angeles Street Phone: A3121. Broadway 3390 LOS ANGELES 

Established 1886 Phone, Market 2848 

T. H. MEEK COMPANY 

Show Cases, Hardwood Interiors Manufacturers ol BILLIARD TABLES, PIVTIIRF^ 
General Cabinet Making STORE, OFFICE AND BAR T 1,/V 1 »JI\t.O 

Salesrooms. 

1157 Mission St. San Francisco 

ase mention this magazine. 



150 



The Architect and Ens^incer 



Del Monte White Sand 

(Known also as Monterey and Lake Majella) 

AND 

Fan Shell Beach Sand 

Combined with the WHITE CEMENTS to produce 
chaste WHITE PLASTER Interior and Exterior 
Finishes, and Plain and Ornamental ARTIFICIAL 
STONE effects. 

Sold by Leading Building Material Dealers from 
Los Angeles to Vancouver, B. C. If not sold by 
your dealer, write to us for Samples and Prices. 

Pacific Improvement Co. 

Phone, Kearny 4013 406 Crocker Building, San Francisco 




BUILD of 
Concrete Slabs 

A FIREPROOF BUILDING 
OF REINFORCED CON- 
CRETE FOR THE SAME 
MONEY AS A COMBUSTI- 
BLE STRUCTURE OF WOOD 

Walls and Partitions of 
Concrete Slabs== 
Waterproof, Crackproof, 
Everlasting==Sanitary 

"^J Note the Air Space 

INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Parker & Ninth Sts. West Berkeley, Cal. 



riting to Advertise 



mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



151 




IMniiifiri 




TTHIS photograph will 
^ give you an idea of 
our BLACK Glazed 
Enameled Brick, a 

strikingly handsome trim 
for either a Red or Cream 
Colored Pressed Brick 
Exterior. Takes the 
place of Stone or Terra 
Cotta. 



Write for Particulars and Samples 

Craycroft-Herrold Brick Co. 

407 Griffith McKenzie Building, 
FRESNO, GAL. 



"BEST PAVING BLOCK MADE" 



Vitrified 

Paving Block 



Vitrified Step 
and Face Brick 



Sewer Brick 

Fancy Face Brick 

Fire Brick 

Common Brick 
AND 



THE HOME OF 

: CALIFORNIA VITRIFIED 

PAVING BLOCK 




Permanent 

and 

Sanitary 
Pavements 



'EVERYTHING IN CLAY BUILDING PRODUCTS" 



CALIFORNIA BRICK COMPANY 



Plant at 

Decoto, California 



630-632 Phelan Building, 
San Francisco, Gal. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazii 



152 Tlic Architect and Engineer 



WITTMAN, 


LYMAN 


& CO. 


PLUMBING, 


STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING 


Agents for the Lilley Drip 
Phone Market 


JKlNC Fountain 

740 




340 MINNA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



WEST COAST WIRE AND IRON WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ARTISTIC BRONZE, IRON AND WIRE WORK 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION AND FINISH 

861-863 HOWARD STREET SAIN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Construction and Engineering Co. 

( Incorporated) 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Phone Garfield 202 Hobart Building, San Francisco 



Phone Market 2693 



MONSON BROS. 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 
Office, 1907 Bryant Street SAN FRANCISCO 



XEW YORK CHICAGO SAX FRAN'CISCO 

MacArthur Bros. Company 

Preliminary Reports, Plans and Specifications, Construction and Erection of Dams, 
Bridges, Railroads, Power Plants. Etc. 

MacArthur Concrete Pile & Foundation Co. 

Foundation Contractors, Pedestal Concrete Piles 
1014 Chronicle Building, San Francisco Phone Sutter 1364 



H. A. Chalmers, Maingcr Telephone Sutter 2985 C. M. Chalmers, Engine. 

H. A. CHALMERS, Inc. 

CONCRETE - FIREPROOFING 



SURETY • BONDS 

LIABILITY J. B. NABORS <&, SONS 

314 KOHL BLDG. phone gutter 4*84 SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

MILLWORK, SASH AND DOORS 

Hardwood Interior Trim a Specialty SAX FRAXCISCO OFFICE. 177 Stevenson Street 
iMAIX OFFICE : 95?I;AXp_._ 486 Tenth Street 

SANTA CLARA, CAL. 

\\ hen writing to Advertisers please mention this magaz 



Tlie Architect and Engineer 



153 



Howard S.Williams 

GENERAL 
CONTRACTOR 
AND BUILDER 



Hearst Building. 
San Francisco 



Telephone. 
Sutter 295 



Telephone Douglas 2031 



M. FISHER 

General Contractor 

105 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco 



Phone Garfield 7906 



Collman & Coliman Co. 



GENERAL 
CONTRACTORS 

526 Sharon BIdg. San Francisco 



The Mosaic Tile Co., 

of Zanesville, Ohio 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

FLOOR, WALL and MANTIiL 

TILE 

San Francisco Office and Warehouse 

230 - 8th Street TeL Market 1383 



Phone Douglas IS66 



ArcHitectural W^orK 
a Specialty 



717 MARKET STREET. SAN 
FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 




ARTHUR W. BIGGERS 



General Contractor and Engineer 



Santa Marina Building, 112 Market Street 

Telephone Connection 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



154 



The Architect and Engineer 





C.W. COBURN & Cos 

APPROVED BUILDING SPECIALTIES 

Among the lines we control for this section may be mentioned: 

Goheen Paints °""""'* 

THE Only 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

0WBONiziNG(oAma ■ ^ ■ 

V__,-'^''0 ">"•'"'• V — i^^<^y~ Its twenty-four colors are lime and 

rr>ifIjtmfATn>STESz alkali-proof. 

Chemically combined and has the same It dries flat, 

coefficient of exp-'n'^ion as the steel. It can be applied over wall paper. 

^^ jO It is an oil enamel. 

C L^'/YWJf'^Vflll^tt'' -ft is made by a varnish house of 

— X^JI4M^l4^&Wt'r/l/ fortv vears' exoerience 

C >^^ ^j.j.i.i J iiTsi^ "^ it comes m any desired tone — from 

• ,, , ^ r ., ^ ^. rich colors to most delicate tints, 

will last from three to seven times j^ j^ washable, 

longer than other pamts. j^ -^ waterproof and sunproof. 

It does not shine and glare. 
It is unusually heavy — weighs nearly 
eighteen pounds to the gallon: heavier 
than paints intended for similar pur- 

FOO STEEL HULLS »«oSTEELC*RS. DOSeS 

is chemically combined and always re- it goes much farther than heaviest 

mains in suspension. Has a covering lead and oil paints. 

capacity of 1250 sq. ft. per gal. 

_^^ ^REWACTOM PAtwT ^ MULTIPLE UNIT PUTTYLESS 

«S^^^£^^::i^Si!^.. SKYLIGH T CONST RUCTION 

, , —^ ^_~ Z^ —^^ ._. Only Glass and Metal Used 

' ■ ■ ^-^ "^ ■— ^- RECENT INSTALLATIONS 

PLUVINOX Reinforced Roofing Pennsvlvania Railroad Terminal, 

SANIFLOR Deadening Felt N. Y 83.000 sq. ft. 

NOVENTO Building Paper C. R. R. of N. J. Terminal J. C, 

and other HYDREX Products 116,000 sq. ft. 

HYDREX Waterproofing Felt and U. S. Gov't Post Office N. Y., 

Compound were specified and used ex- 33,000 sq. ft. 

clusively for the waterproofing of N. Y. Edison Power Stations .. . 

fortifications, tunnels, etc., at Panama. 17,500 sq. ft. 

Every order received being stamped as 14,000 sq. ft. 

follows: "Purchased in the open U. S. Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., 

market without advertising, it being 7,470 sq. ft. 

impracticable to secure competition ^- Y. C. & H. R. "R. R. Boiler 

because the material ordered is speci- Shops, W. A 6,788 sq. ft. 

fied by the officials on the Isthmus as By 

the only kind that will meet the re- ., .. , ,, ... .. „ 

quirements of the service. " Natioflal Ventilating CoiTipany 

Prompt response all to inquiries. Literature on any of the above mailed 
upon request. Quick deliveries fro-n stocks warehoused in San Francisco. 

C. W. COBURN & CO., 

Tel. Sutter 2211 320 Market St., San Francisco 



I "GOLDEN GATE CEMENT"^ An Insurance of Permanent Results 

iTHE ARCHITECT 
AND ENGINEER 
OF CALIFORNIA 

THE WORK OF JOHN J. DONOVAN 




_,^,^,«^5wr-»'5K- 



MARCH 



MCMXV 



PVBLI5HED IN SAN FRANCISCO- 

25 GENT^ A COPY ^ ONE DOLLAR AND A HALF A YEIAR 



SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND SEATTLE LOS ANGELES VANCOUVER 



L. A. NORRIS CO. 

Clinton Welded Reinforcing System 
STEEL BARS AND CLINTON FABRIC 



CLINTON WIRE LATH 

Phone Kearnjr 5375 140 TOWNSEND STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ART HARDWARE 

REPRESENTATIVE FOR 

Yale and Towne Fine Hardware 
Lockwood Mfg. Go's Builders' Hardware 

DISPLAY ROOMS 
San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley 

PACIFIC HARDWARE AND STEEL CO. 



IMTT T?G CLEAN GRAVEL and 
illJUriiO CRUSHED ROCK 

Means a Good Job of Concrete. 

Contractors who want Prompt Delivery, Right Quotations and the 
Best Material, write or call up the 

California Building Material Co. 

Phone, Sutter 4845 500=4 NEW CALL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 



Guaranteed Building Specialties 

Enameled Brick (American Enameled Dumbwaiters (Energy Elevator Co. ) 

Brick and Tile Co.) Badiator Valves ( Lavigne Mfg. Co.) 

Safety Treads (American Mason Safety Elevating- Window Fixtures (Tabor Sash 

Tread Co. p^ixture Co. i 

Hollow Metal Steel and Bronze Doors Metal Weather Strip, Bronze and Zinc 

and Trim (Monarch Metal Mfg. Co.) ( Monarcli Metal \\'eather Strip Co.) 
Revolving- Door (Atchison). Waterproofing Compound and Steel 
Medicine Cabinets (Corey Metal Mfg. Co.) Cement Hardener C-Insulite," "Aqua- 
Metal Lockers (Hart & Cooley Co.) hor" and 'Xational." ) 
Warehouse Doors, Boiling Steel Shut- -Venetian Blinds ( Swedish Venetian Blind 

ters, Garage and Elevator Doors Co.) 

(Variety Manufacturing Co.) Telephone Kearny 2386 

C. JORGENSEN & COMPANY ''' ^A%''nl^c^JcV''^ 



Medusa White Portland Cement used 
on Oakland's Million Dollar Auditorium 




FRONT ELEVATION. JOHN J. DONOVAN and HENRY HORNBOSTEL, Architects 

The P}iotograph reproduced below was taken February 8th and shows how beauti- 
fully Medusa White Portland Cement blends with the white granite front. Both sides 
and rear of this great structure are to be finished in Medusa. 




MEDUSA 



Stainless 
Cement 

is the first 
TRUE 

White 
Portland 
Cement 

manufactured 



BUILDING MATERIAL CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

583 MONADNOCK BLDG., SAN FRANCISCO 



The Architect and Em^iiicci 




MARY'S HELP HOSPITAL. SAN FRAXCISCO, CHARLES J. L DEVLIN. ARCHITECT 

5ED THROLIGHC 
THIS BUILDING 



HARDWOOD FLOORS ^ed throughout 



MANUFACTURED AND INS'I ALLED BY 



SAN 



HARDWOOD INTERIOR COMPANY franckco 



01merican 2Ceene Cement Co. 

Office, 257 Monadnock Building, SAN FRANCISCO 
Works, SIGUARD, UTAH 

Formerly Known as BICKELS KEENE CEMENT 




"Strongest Keene Cement Known" 

RECENT SAN FRANCISCO BUILDINGS: 
Flood Residence, Bliss & Faville, Architects 

Physicians' Building, Frederick H. Meyer, Architect 

Hotel Ramona, Smith & Stewart, Architects 

American Keene Cement Company 

of California 



Telephone Garfield 7331 



SAN FRANCISCO 



257 Monadnock Building 



When writing to Advertisers pie 



The Architect and Emiinecr 




F. N. Dodge. Aichitecis 



The Architect and Engineer 




BELGRAVIA APART- 



San Francesco : Calif. 



EQUIPPED WITH 

» PITCHER 

Disappearing Doors 
Adjustable Hangers 



Patented Frames 



Piicher Disappe-- - 

stalled in 5 J4-incJ: I 
Extra Thickness oi V\ 3_ «.o~^:rei. 
Specify ^ding Doors in Place cf 

Svi'insiiig Do-ors. 



NATIONAL MILL & LUMBER CO. 

5rh and Brvant Streets. San Francisco 



MILLWORK 

ox THE FOLLOWING OAKLAND BUILDINGS: 

Municipal Auditorium. 
Longfellow School. 
Lakeview School. 
Ehirrant School, 
Dewey School. 

Fremont High School. 

etc.. etc.. etc. 
JOHN J. DONOVAN, City Architect 

FURNISHED BY 

PACIFIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



Santa Clara. California 



San Francisco Office: 
177 5te\enson Street 



Oakland Office: 
4>0 Tenth Streer 



Advertisers please mentiao this siae^zine. 



The Arclulcct and Engineer 



The STANDARD for Cement Painting 




IN PASTE FORM ONLY 

San Francisco Office, 311 California Street 
A. L. GREENE, Agent 

DISTRIBUTORS 

SUNSET PMNT CO. D. H. RHODES 

627 So. Main Street 546 Valencia Street 

Los Angeles San Francisco 




INTERIOR FINISH 

BOSTON VARNISH COMPANY, Boston 



'W. J Hanson & Co. 



311 California Street. San Francisco 

A. L. Greene. ^Vestern Representative 
S. W. Hn^es ft Co. 



SanEet Paint Co. 



When writing to .\dvertiser= please menticTn this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 

rFOR MODERN REINFORCED CONCRETE- 
DAYLIGHTED BUILDINGS 

We manufacture and can furnish all the required Materials except 
the cement, sand, stone and lumber. We will promptly furnish esti- 
mates on any construction for these products 

UNITED SASH FLORETYLES 

UNITED CASEMENTS TRUSSED fl-OREDOMES 

United Fire Windows p|^i\Tp«ocxi7 "^"'^'^ 

UNITED DOORS ^UIM UKt i t pig latH 

KAHN BARS STEEL DIAMOND MESH 

RIB BARS ppi CHANNELS 

COLUMN HOOPING ^ ^Y* CORNER BEAD 

Home Office and Plant 

RIB METAL youngstown, ohio rib STUDS 



ARMOR PLATE siTSharo^mlrTehLtterioez SLOTTED INSERTS 

CURB BARS PORTLAND°^SErTTLE%POKANE SPECIALTIES 

— ^— TRUS-CON CHEMICAL PRODUCTS ^-^ 



TAY'S GUARANTEED 
PLUMBING FIXTURES 

speak for themselves. 

See many Installations in 

OAKLAND'S NEW SCHOOLS 

and 

Prominent Residences in 
Alameda County 



Showrooms frjr* ^ ^ , .r^ After 

1761 BROADWAY MV I /M JUNE 1st 

1808 TELEGRAPH \\ \'l/ / ./ lOtli and HARRISON 




^\'hen writing to Advertisers please mentiin this magazii 



The Architect and Eiii'iiicer 




ARCHITECTS* SPECIFICATION INDEX 



(Fc 



Inde 



j^d^rertisements, see next pa^e) 



ARCHITECTURAL SCULPTORS, MODELING, 

G. Rognier & Co., 233 R. R. Ave.. San Mateo. 
G. Tomagnini & Co., 219 Tenth St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

Gladding. McBean & Company, Crocker Eldg., 

San Francisco. 
Steigcr Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Independent Sewer Pipe & Terra Cotta Co., 

235 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles. 

ART GLASS 

Sylvain Le Deit, 124 Lenzen Ave.. San Jose. 
Fresno Art Glass Co., 2124 Tuolumne St., 
Fresno. 

AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS 

Scott Company. 243 Minna St.. San Francisco 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 
St.. San Francisco. 

BANK FIXTURES AND INTERIORS 

A. J. Forbes & Son, 1530 Filbert St., San Fran- 



M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., San 
Home Mfg. Co., 543 Brannan St., 

Cisco. 
T. H. Meek & Co.. 1157 Mission St.. 



Company. Ne 



BELTING. PACKING, ETC. 

H. N. Cook Belting Co., 317-319 Howard St., 
San Francisco. 

BLACKBOARDS 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

BONDS FOR CONTRACTORS 

Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland. In- 
surance Exchange Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Globe Indemnity Co., Insurance Exchange Bldg.. 
San Francisco. 

J. B. Nabors & Sons. Kohl Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Casualty Co., 416 Montgomery St.. 
San Francisco. 

BRICK— PRESSED, PAVING, ETC. 

California Paving Brick Co., Phelan Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Granite Press Brick Co., Ochsner Bldg., Sacra- 
mento. 

Diamona Brick Co.. Balboa Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Gladding. McBean & Company, Crocker Bldg., 
San Francisco. 



BRICK— PRESSED, PAVING, ETC.— Continued. 
Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co., Frost Bldg., Loi 

Angeles. 
Livermore Fire Brick Co.. Livermore. Cal. 
Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg.. San 



Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery Works, Mills 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

BRICK AND CEMENT COATING 

Wadsworth. Howland & Co.. Inc. (See Adv. 
for Pacific Coast Agents.) 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St.. San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Par-Seal, made by Trussed Concrete 
Steel Co. (See Adv. for Pacific Coast 
Agents.) 
. Glidden Products, sold by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
Howard and Beale Sts.. San Francisco, and 
Tibbetts-Oldfield Co., 908 Swain St., Los An- 
geles. 

BRICK STAINS 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass.. agencies 
in San Francisco. Oakland. Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE 

Bennett Bros., agents for Sargent Hardware, 
514 Market St.. San Francisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Berkeley, and Los Angeles. 

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co., Commercial Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

BUILDING MATERIAL. SUPPLIES. ETC. 

Pacific Building Materials Co., 523 Market St., 
San Francisco. 

C. Torgensen & Co.. 356 Market St., S. F. 

Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 
St.. San Francisco. 

C. Roman, 173 Tessie St.. San Francisco. 

C. F. Pratt Building Material Co.. Hearst 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

CASTINGS 

Pacific Foundry Company, Harrison and 18th 
Sts., San Francisco. 

CEMENT 

Atlas Portland Cement Co.. 
■ed Materials Co. and Pa. 
Company, San Francisco. 

Mt. Diablo, sold bv Henrv Cowell Lime & Ce- 
ment Co.. 9 Main St.. San Francisco. 

"Golden Gate." manufactured by Pacific Port- 
land Cement Co.. Pacific Bldg., San Francisco. 



GRANT CONCRETE MIX" 

: gravel, free from sand stone, and contains about 

WE GUARANTEE LESS THAN 25*^^ VOIDS. 

cad work. Accepted on alt City. Stat' 



16 only properly proportioned mix 
this market. Composed of hard, 
~c of crushed rock and necessary 



nd U. S. 



Used on manv important first-class buildings ; 
Gove„mentwork QRANT GRAVEL COMPANY 

FLATIROX BLDG,. Phone Sutter 1582, SAX FRANCISCO 



The Architect and EnHnccr 



An Index to the Advertisements 



Page 
American Art Metal Works. . . 148 

American Concrete Co 149 

American Keene Cement Co. . 2 

American Rolling Mill 30 

American Standard Oil Burner 



Co., 



26 

Steel Bar Co 27 

Amweg. F. J 130 

Andrews. A. H. 13 

Armstrong Cork Co 145 

Atlas Portland Cement Co. . . 3 

Austin Cube Mixer 26 

120 



Bacon, Ed. R 

Bass-Hueter Co 

Bennett Bros 

Biggers. A. W 

Biturine Co 

Boise Sandstone Co 

Boscus, J. M 

Boston Varnish Co 

Bowser & Co., S. F 

Braun, J. G 

Breite, W. W 

Erode Iron Works 

Building Material Co 

Bullis, E. A.& Co 

Burdett-Rowntree Mfg. Co. . . 
Burlington Venetian Blind Co. 

Burnett Iron Works 

Butte Engineering Co 



, 20 

Caementum Paint 

Calif. Artistic Metal & Wire Co. 14 

California Bldg. Material Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

California Granite Co 122 

California Paving Brick Co. . . 151 
California Photo Engraving Co. 153 
California Plumbing Supply Co. 33 
Capitol Sheet Metal Works . 9 

Central Electric Co 122 

Central Iron Works 31 

Chalmers, H. A 152 

Chicago Pump Co 131 

Chowen, W. A 146 

Clinton Fireoroofing Co . 143 

Cobum, C. W 154 

Cole Gas Furnace Co. 134B 

Coleman, Alex 138 

Collins Studding 134H 

CoUman & CoUman 153 

Colonial Fireolace Co 33 

Concrete Engineering Co 152 

Connolly. J. J 130 

Construction & Engineer'g Co. 152 

Cook, H. N., Belting Co 26 

Cowell Lime & Cement Co . . . 146 

Crane Co 33 

Cutler Mail Chute Co V.'. 28 

Dahlstrom Metallic Door Co.. 132 

Decker Electrical Co 134D 

Denison Blocks 124 

Diamond Brick Co 22 

Dieckmann Hardwood Co. .. . 120 

Dolbear Curb Bar 27 

Dudfield Lumber Co 147 

Dyer Bros 29 

Elevator Supply and Repair Co. 15 

Ferguson. W. H 143 

Fess System ,' ig 

Fibrestone and Roofing Co .. ! II 
Fidelity and Deposit Company 

of Maryland 143 

Finch, Chas. M . . . . ' " ' 146 

Fink & Schindler Co.. The'. '. '.'. 126 

Fisher & Clanser 134B 

Fisher, M ' ' 153 

Fitzpatrick, F. W .' 148 

FJagg, Edwin H., Scenic Co.. . 9 

Forbes, A, J. & Son 146 

Foster, Vogt Co 130 

Foyle, R. W 141 

Frankfort Insurance Co 146 

Fresno Art Glass Co 146 



Fuller, W. P., Co 19 

Gaspard &Hammond 10 

Giant Suction Cleaner Co ... . 134 

Gladding, McBean & Co 25 

Glanber Mfg. Co.. 35 

Globe Indemnity Co 149 

Granite Press Brick Co 143 

Grant Gravel Co 7 

Gravity Spiral Chute Co 137 

Hammond. M. E 148 

Hardwood Interior Co 2 

Hauser Reversible Window. . . 146 
Haws Sanitary Drinking Foun- 
tain 128-129 

Hillard, C. J., Co 32 

Holloway Expanded Metal Lath 

Co 139 

Home Mfg. Co 130 

Hunt, Robt. W. & Co 121 

Hunter & Hudson 122 

Imperial Waterproofing Co 29 

Improved Sanitary Fixture Co. 15 
Independent Sewer Pipe & 

Terra Cotta Co 149 

International Concrete Con. Co 150 
Invincible Vacuum Cleaner. . . 165 

Jarvis, T. P 140 

Jenkins Bros 145 

Johnson, S. T., Co 13 

Jorgensen & Co 2d Cover 

Judson Mfg. Co 148 

... 36 



Kinnear Rolling Doors. 

Lange & Bergstrom 134C 

Le Deit, Sylvain 7 

Livermore Fire Brick Co 36 

Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co. 34 

MacArthur Bros. Co 152 

Mackenzie Roof Co 138 

MacMeansCo 143 

Mangrum & Otter 137 

Marshall & Stearns Co 29 

McCabe Hanger Co.. . 130 

McKibben & Taylor 130 

McLaren & Peterson 143 

Medusa Portland Cement 1 

Meek. T. H 149 

Merritt Ironing Board 32 



Me 



147 



Moller. R. W 143 

Monk, John 141 

Monson Bros 1 52 

Morehouse. C. C 135 

Mortenson Construction Co.. . 10 

Mott Iron Works 33 

Municipal Engineering Co. .. , 136 

Muralo Co 5 

Myers, Garfield 134D 

Nabors & Sons 149 

Nathan, Dohrmann Co 138 

National Lumber Co 4 

National Roofing Co 14 

Nelson, N. O 18 

Niles Sand. Gravel & Rock Co. 22 
Norris Co., L.A.. Inside Front Cover 

Otis Elevator Co Back Cover, 

Otto, W. H 146 

Owsley, Bert 122 

Pacific Building Materials Co. 

Inside Back Cover 

Pacific Coast Casualty Co ... . 143 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co. . 26 

Pacific Foundry Co 145 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co 142 

Pacific Gumey Elevator Co . . . 130 
Pacific Hardware and Steel Co. 

Inside Front Cover 

Pacific Imp.Co 150 

Pacific Mfg. Co 4 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Co. . . . 

Back of Cover 



Pacific Portland Cement Co. 

1st and 4th Cover 

Pacific Rolling Mills 31 

Pacific Sanitary Mfg. Co. . . . 

Back of Cover 

Pacific Structural Iron Works . 149 

Pacific Sewer Pipe Co 25 

Palm Iron Works 32 

Palmer, P. A 143 

Paraffine Pamt Co 21 

Parrott & Co 134A 

Perfection Reversible Window 

Co 125 

Petersen- James Co 134A 

Phillips, Chas. T 140 

Pierce Hardware Co 35 

Pitcher Door Hanger 4 

Pittsburg Water Heater. .Insert A 
Pratt Bldg. Material Co.. Insert C 
Prometheus Electric Co 148 

Ralston Iron Works 32 

Ransome Concrete Co 122 

Raymond Granite Co 141 

Reliance Bail-Bearing Door 

Hanger 126 

Riggs, Arthur T 138 

Rognier & Co 138 

Roman, C 18 

Russell & Erwin 24 

Samson Cordage Works 122 

S. F. Metal Stamping and Cor- 
rugating Co 28 

S. F. Pioneer Varnish Works. . 17 

Santa Fe Lumber Co 147 

SchaerBros 18 

Scott Co 130 

Self Winding Clock Co 134D 

Shreiber & Sons Co 28 

Southern Pacific Co 134 

Spencer Elevator Co 13 

Standard Varnish Works 139 

Steiger Terra Cotta & Pottery 

Works 25 

Stock, Lester H 122 

Sturgis, G. E 137 

Sunset Lumber Company 147 

Swan. Robert 138 

Tay, George H. . 6 

Telephone Electric Equipment 

Co 131 

Thayer & Co 21 

Tomagnini & Co 16 

Toplight Shade Co 142 

Trussed Concrete Steel Co ... . 6 

Tuec Co 133 

United Electric Co 133 

United Materials Co 34 

U. S. Metal Products Co 37 

U. S. Steel Products Co 144 

Utility Gas Generator Co 137 

Van Emon, B. C. . . 151 

Van Fleet. M. C 145 

Vulcan Iron Works 28 

Wadsworth. Howland & Co.. . 30 

Waters, R. J 153 

Weber. C. F. & Co 128-129 

West Coast Wire & Iron Works 152 

West. M. G 132 

Western Building and Engineer- 
Company *. . , 135 

Western Builders' Supply Co . . 23 

Western Iron Works 31 

Western States Porcelain Co. . 22 

White Bros 118 

White Steel Sanitarj' Co 11 

Whitney Window Co 25 

Williams Bros. & Henderson.. 141 

Williams. H. S 153 

Winner Co., H. H -. 138 

Wittman, Lyman & Co 152 

Wood Lumber Co 122 

Woods & Huddart 140 

Zelinsky, D 149 



The Architect and Ens:ineer 



Telephone 
Sunset So. 
6558. 
Hime 24338. 




lARGtST 
THEATRE 
OUTFinERS 
IN AMERICA 



DROP CURTAINS, SCENERY, SUPPLIES. DECORATIONS 



SPECIAL WESTERN AGENTS J. R. CLANCY. SYRACUSE, N.Y.. STAGE HAROWARE. 

ch Ave.. Los .Angeles. u:> \V. 4:d St.. New York City. 502 WestbRnk Bida., San 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX-Conttnued 



CEMENT— Continued. 

Medusa White Portland Cement, sold by Build- 
ing Material Co., Inc., Monadnock Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

CEMENT E-XTERIOR \V.\TERPROOF CO.\TING 

Bav State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. (See distributing 
.Agents on page 30.) 

Eiturine Co., of America, 24 California St.. San 
Francisco. 

'•Impervite' sold by E. A. Bullis S: Co. (See 
advertisement on page 26.) 

Imperial Waterproofing, manufactured bv Im- 
perial Co., 183 Stevenson St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Par-Seal, made by Trussed Concrete 
Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

CEMENT EXTERIOR FINISH 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 

St.. San Francisco. 
Bav State Brick and Cement Coating, made bv 
Wadsworth. Howland & Co. (See list of Dis- 
tributing .Agents on page 30.) 
Dry Mortar Colors sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. 

(See advertisement, page 26.) 
Medusa White Portland Cement, California 
Agents, the Building Material Co., Inc., 587 
Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco. 
Concrete Cement Coating, manufactured by the 
Muralo Company, 540 A'alencia St., San Fran- 
Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co.. Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

CEMENT FLOOR CO.ATING 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. (See list of Dis- 
tributing .Agents on page 30.) 

"Federal Steel Cement Hardener" manufac- 
tured by Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleve- 
land, represented by E. .A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement, page 26.) 

CEMENT TESTS— CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
Robert W. Hunt & Co., 251 Kearny St., San 



CHUTES— GR.AAITY SPIRAL 

Gravity Spiral Chutes by Minnesota Manufac- 
turers' Association. G. E. Sturgis, Agt., 602 
Mission St., San Francisco. 

Insley Gravity System for pouring concrete, 
represented by Garfield Myers. Hearst Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

CEMENT MORTAR HARDENER 

"Federal Steel Cement Hardener" manufac- 
tured by Federal Steel Cement Mills. Cleve- 
land, represented by E. .A. Bullis & Co. (See 
advertisement, page 26.) 



COLD STORAGE PLANTS 

A'ulcan Iron Works, San Francisco. 
T. P. Jarvis Crude Oil Burning Co., 
necticut St., San Francisco. 

CLOCKS— TOWER 

Decker Electrical Construction Co., 
Montgomery St., San Francisco, 

COMPOSITION FLOORING 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howar. 



COMPRESSED AIR CLEANERS 

The B. & W. Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, sold 
by Arthur T. Riggs, 510 Claus Spreckels 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Excello Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, F. W. 
Schaer Co., Pacific Coast Agts., Santa Maria 
Bldg., San Francisco, 

Giant Stationary Suction Cleaner, San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland. 

Invincible Vacuum Cleaner, sold by R. W. 
Foyle, 149 New Montgomery St., San Fran- 

Tuec, "mfrd. by United Electric Company, Coast 
Branch, General Contractors' Association, San 
Francisco. 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

American Concrete Co., Humboldt Bank Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
Clinton Fireproofing Co., Mutual Bank Bldg., 

San Francisco. 
McKibben & Taylor, 2125 Shattuck Ave., Berke- 

Otto.'W. H., 269 Park .Ave., San Jose. 

Foster, vogt Co., Sharon Bldg., San Francisco. 

P. A. Palmer, Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco. 

Ransome Concrete Co., Oakland and Sacra- 
mento. 

Internationa! Concrete Construction Company, 
West Berkeley, Cal. 

CONCRETE HARDENERS 

"Federal Steel Concrete Hardener," mfd. by 
Federal Steel Cement Mills, Cleveland, Ohio, 
sold by E. .A. Bullis & Co. (See ad., p. 26.) 

CONCRETE MACHINERY 

Garfield Myers, factory representat 
Manufacturing Company, 
Company, Hearst Bldg., S: 

CONCRETE MI."^ERS 

Austin Improved Cube M 



of Insley 
Marsh-Capron 



Factory 
473-485 Sixth St., San Francisco. 
Foote Mixers sold by Edw. R. Bacon, 
toma St., San Francisco. 

CONCRETE PILES 

Mc.Arthur Concrete Pile Company. ( 
Building, San Francisco. 



Underwriters' Label- 
led Fire Doors and 
Windows— Kalamein 
Interior Metal Doors 
and Trim — Metal 
Comer Bead — Metal 
Furniture, etc. 



Capitol Sheet Metal Works 

Manufacturer of '^'=- 

SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 

:isco Office and Factory, 1927-1935 MARKET STREET 
id Office and Factory, 117-119 FRANKLIN STREET 



10 



The Architect and Engineer 



Telephone Sutter 4765 

QASRARD 



<Sr HAiyiMOIND 



BUIUDIIVQ COrSSTRUCTIOIN 

425 Sharon Building, 55 New Montgomery St. San Francisco, Cal. 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX-Contlnu«d 



CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT 

United States Steel Products Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles. Portland and Seattle. 

Clinton Welded Reinforcing System. L. A. Nor- 
ris, 140 Townsend St., San Francisco. 

"Kahn System," see advertisement on page 31. 
this issue. , 

International Fabric & Cable, represented by 
Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Triangle Mesh Fabric. Sales Agents, Pacific 
Building Materials Co., 523 Market St., San 
Francisco. 

Twisted Bars, sold by Woods & Huddart, 444 
Market St., San Francisco. 

CONCRETE SURFACING 
"Biturine, 
Californ 
"Concrcta 



Id by Biturine Co. < 
jt., San Francisco, 
lid by W. P. Fulle 



if Amcrii 
r & Co., 



Wadsworth, Rowland & Co.'s Bay State Brick 
and Cement Coating, sold by R. N. Nason & 
Co., San Francisco and Los Angeles. 

Glidden Liquid Cement, manufactured by GHd- 
den Varnish Co.. Whittier, Coburn Co., San 



American Cor 
San Francisco. 

Arthur W. Bigger 
Cisco. 

Collman & Collman, 
Francisco. 

Construction & Engii 



CONTRACTORS. GENERAL 

Crete Co., Humboldt Bank Bldg., 

112 Market St., San Fran- 

1, 526 Sharon Bldg., San 

■ing Co., Hobart Bldg., 

M. Fisher, California-Pacific Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Foster. Vogt Co., Sharon Bldg.. San F 

Gaspard & Hammond, Sharon Bldg., San F 
Cisco. (See card above.) 

Howard S. Williams, Hearst Bldg.. San F 
Cisco. 

Lange & Bcrgstrom, Sharon Bldg., San F 

Lester Stock, 12 Geary St., San Francisco. 
McLaren & Peterson, Sharon Bldg., San F 

Cisco. 
R. W. Moller, 185 Stevenson St., Sai 
John Monk. 216 Sharon Bldg.. San Francisco. 
Monson Bros.. 1907 Brvant St.. San Francisco. 
Burt T. Owsley. 311 Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 

Ranson'ie Concrete Co.. Sacramento, Cal. 
Western Building & Engineering Co., 455 Phelan 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
Williams Bros. & Henderson, Holbrook Bldg., 



CORK FLOORING 

"Linotile," manufactured by .Arn 
Insulation Company. M. C. \ 
120 Jessie St., San Francisco. 
CORNER BAR 

Dolbear Curb Bar, manufacture. 
Steel Bar Co.. 1034 Merch 
Bldg.. San Francisco. 



ona Cork & 
Fleet, agt., 



CORNER BEAD 

Capitol Sheet Metal Works, 1827 Market St„ 

San Francisco. 
United States Metal Products Co., 525 Market 

St., San Francisco.; 750 Keller St., San Fran- 

CRUSHED ROCK 

Grant Gravel Co., Flat Iron Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Niles Rock, sold by California Building Ma- 
terial Company, new Call Bldg., San Francisco. 

Niles Sand, Gravel & Rock Co., Mutual Bank 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg,, San 
Francisco. 

DAMP-PROOFING COMPOUND 

Biturine Co. of America, 24 California St., 

San Francisco. 
GHdden's Liquid Rubber, sold on Pacific Coast 

by Whittier. Coburn Company, San Fran- 
Imperial Co., 183 Stevenson St.. San Francisco. 
"Impervite." sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (See 

adv. on page 26.) 
Trus-Con Damp Proofing. (See advertisement 

of Trussed Concrete Steel Company for Coast 

agencies.) 
"Pabco" Damp Proofing Compound, sold by 

Paraffine Paint Co., 34 First St., San Fran- 

Wadsw'orth: Howland & Co.. Inc., 84 Washing- 
ton St., Boston. (See Adv. for Coast agen- 
cies.) 
DOOR HANGERS 

McCabe Hanger Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y. 

Pitcher Hanger, sold by National Lumber Co.. 
Fifth and Brvant Sts., San Francisco. 

Reliance Hanger, sold by Sartorius Co., San 
Francisco; D. F. Fryer & Co.. Louis R. Be- 
dell. Los Angeles, and Portland Wire & Iron 
Works. 
DRINKING FOUNTAINS 

Haws Sanitary Fountain. 1808 Harmon St., 
Berkeley, and C. F. Weber & Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 

N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Crane Company, San Francisco, Oakland, and 
Los Angeles. 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Co.. 67 New Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco. 
DUMB WAITERS 

Spencer Elevator Company, 173 Beale St., San 
Francisco. 

Burdett-Rowntiee Mfg. Co., Underwood Bldg.. 
San Francisco. 
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Butte Engineering Co., 683 Howard St., San 
F.-ancisco, 

Central Electric Co., 185 Stevenson St., San 



Co, 



St., San Francisco. 
507 Montgomery 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 
Chas. T. Phillips. Pacific Bldg., 



MORTENSON CONSTRUCTION CO. 

CONTRACTORS FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL AND IRON 

H. MORTENSON. Pres. CHAS. G. MORTENSON, VicePres. .^nd Mgr. 

OFFICE AND SHOPS: CORNER ISTH AND INDIANA STREETS 

Phones: Mission 5033— Home IVI 3916 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



TJic Architect and Engineer 



11 



"FIBRESTONE" 



SANITARY FLOORING, WAINSCOT AND BASE. 



Laid Exclusively by 



Tel. Sutter 33» 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFIC 

ELECTRIC PLATE WARMER 

The Prometheus Electric Plate Warmer foi 
residences, clubs, hotels, etc. Sold by M. E 
Hammond, Humboldt Bank Bldg., San Fran 
Cisco. 

ELEV.\TORS 
Otis Elev 



Spenc 
Era 

San : 
San 

Pacifi. 



ato 



San F 



El 



Company, Stockton and North 
pany, 126 Beale St.. San 
Elevator Co., 860 Folsora St., 
Elevator Co., 186 Fifth St., San 
ion Elevator Co.. 2,15 First St.. 



ELEVATORS, SIGNALS, FLASHLIGHTS AND 
DIAL INDICATORS 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co.. Underwood Bldg., 
San Francisco 

ELE\-ATOR ENXLOSURES 

J. G. Braun. 615-621 S. Paulina St., Chicago. 111. 
ENGINEERS 

F. J. Amweg, 700 Marston Bldg., San Fran- 

W. W.' Breite, Clunie Bldg.. San Francisco. 
L. M. Hausmann, Sharon Bldg., San Francisco. 
Chas. T. Phillips, Pacific Bldg., San Francisco. 
Hunter & Hudson, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 

EXPRESS CALL SYSTEM 

Elevator Supply & Repair Co., U'ndcrwood 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
FIRE EXIT DE\'ICES 

Von Duprin Self-Releasing Fire Exit Devices, 
Vonnegut Hardware Co. (See Adv. for Coast 
Agencies.) 
FIRE ESCAPES 

Burnett Iron Works, Fresno, Cal. 
Pacific Structural Iron Works, Structural Iro.i 
and Steel, Fire Escapes, etc. Phone Market 
1374; Home J. 3435. 370-84 Tenth St., San 
Francisco. 
Palm Iron S: Bridge Works. Sacramento. 
Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 

Scott Company, 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 
Pacific Fire E.xtinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco. 
FIRE BRICK 

Livermore Fire Brick Co., Livermore. Cal. 
FIREPL.ACE DAMPER 

and Damper^ for open fireplaces 



Colonial Fireplace Co.. Chic 



es.) 



adv 



FIREPROOFING AND PARTITIONS 

Gladding, McEean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 

Los Angeles Pressed Brick Co., Frost Bldg.. 
Los Angeles. 



ATION INDEX-Con<<nu<-d 

FIXTURES— BANK, OFFICE. STORE. ETC. 
A. J. Forbes 4 Son, 1530 Filbert St., San Fran- 
Fink & Schindler, 218 13th St., San Francisco. 
C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco and 210 N. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
T. H. Meek Co., 1157 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
FLAG POLES— TACKLE, ETC. 

Pacific Foundry Company, Harrison and 18th 
Sts,, San Francisco. 
FLOOR VARNISH 

Bass-Hueter and San Francisco Pioneer Varnish 

Works, S16 Mission St.. San Francisco. 
R. N. Nason & Co., 151 Potrero Ave., San 

Francisco. 
Standard Varnish Works, Chicago, New York 

and San Francisco. 
Glidden Products, sold by Whittier-Coburn Co., 
San Francisco. 
FLOORING— MAGNESITE 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 
FLUMES 

California Corrugated Culvert Co., West Berk- 
eley. Cal. 
FURNACES 

Cole Floor Furnace Company. 
GARAGE EQUIPMENT 

Bowser Gasoline Tanks and Outfit, Bowser & 
Co.. 612 Howard St., San Francisco. 
GARDEN FURNITURE 

G. Tomagnini & Co., 219 Tenth St., San Fran- 



O. S. Sarsi, 123 Oak St., Sai 
GAS GENERATORS 

Utility Gas Generator Co., 340 Sansome St., 
San Francisco. 
GLASS 

W. P. Fuller & Company, all principal Coast 

Whittier-Coburn Co., Howard & Beale Sts., San 
Francisco. 
GRANITE 

California Granite Co., Sharon Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Raymond Granite Co., Division and Potrero Sts., 
San Francisco. 
GRA\EL. SAND AND CRUSHED ROCK 

California Building Material Co., new Call Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

Del Monte White Sand, sold by Pacific Improve- 
ment Co.. Crocker Bide.. San Francisco. 

Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg.. San 
Francisco. 

Grant Gravel Co., Flatiron Bldg., San Fran- 

Niles Sand. Gravel & Rock Co., Mutual Savings 
Bank Bldg.. 704 Market St.. San Francisco. 
GRA\-ITY CHUTES 

Gravity Spiral Chutes, sold by G. E. Sturgis' 
Supply House, 602 Mission St., San Francisco. 




•■White-Steel" Medicu 
Bathroom Equipment. Se 
full information. 

"WHITE-STEEL" SANITARY FURNITURE CO. 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Northern California Southern California 

Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co. H. R. Boynton Company 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 



12 



The Architect and Eiii:;uiccr 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX-Confinaed 



HARDWALL PLASTER 

Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Co.. San Fn 
American Keene Cement Co., 333 Monadnock 

Bldg., San Francisco. 
"Empire" Hardwall Plaster, Pacific Portland 

Cement Company, Pacific Eldg., San Fran- 

HARDVVARE 

Russwin Hardware, Joost Bros., San Francisco. 

Pacific Hardware S: Steel Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Berkeley, Los Angeles and 
San Diego. 

Sargent's Hardware, sold by Bennett Bros., 514 
Market St., San Francisco. 

Western Brass Mfg. Co., 217 Tehama St., S. F. 

Russell & Erwin Manufacturing Co., Commercial 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

HARDWOOD FLOORING 

Parrott & Co., 320 California St., San Francisco 
White Bros., Cor. Fifth and Brannan Sts., San 

Francisco. ' 
Hardwood Interior Co., 554 Bryant St., San 

Francisco. 

HARDWOOD LUMBER 

Dieckmann Hardwood Co., Beach and Taylor 
Sts., San Francisco. 

Parrott & Co., 320 California St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

White Bros., Cor. Fifth and Brannan Sts., San 
Francisco. 

HEATERS— AUTOMATIC 

Pittsburg Water Heater Co., 237 Powell St.. 

San Francisco. 
Hoffman Heaters, factory branch, 397 Sutter 

St., San Francisco. 

HEATING AND VENTILATING 

American Heat & Power Co., Oakland, Cal. 
J. M. Boscus. 975 Howard St., San Francisco. 
Fess System Co., 2J0 Natoma St., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter, Inc., 507 Mission St., San 

Francisco. 
Charles T. Phillips, Pacific Building, San Fran- 
Scott Company, 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 
Wittman, Lyman & Co., 341 Minna St., San 

Francisco. 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 507 Montgomery 

St.. San Francisco. 
Petersen-James Co., 730 Larkin St., San Fran- 



HOLLOW BLOCKS 

Denison Hollow Interlocking Blocks, 310 Ochs- 
ner Bldg., Sacramento, and Chamber of Com- 
merce Bldg., Portland. 

INGOT IRON 

"Armco" brand, manufactured by American 
Rolling Mill Company, Middletown, Ohio. 
INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 

Robert W. Hunt & Co., 251 Kearny St., San 
Francisco. 
IRONING BOARDS 

Merritt Patent Ironing Board, sold by A. Hom- 
mel, agent, Atlanta Hotel, San Francisco. 
JOIST HANGERS 

Western Builders' Supply Co., 155 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 
KEENE CEMENT 

American Keene Cement Co., Monadnock Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
LIM_E 

Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Co., 9 Main St.. 
San Francisco. 
LIGHT, HEAT AND POWER 

Pacific Gas & Elec. Co., 445 Sutter St., San 
Francisco. 
LUMBER 

Dudfield Lumber Co., Palo Alto, Cal. 

Sunset Lumber Co., Oakland, Cal. 

Santa Fe Lumber Co., Seventeenth and De Haro 

Sts., San Francisco. 
E. K. Wood I^lmber Company, East Oakland, 

California. 
Pacific Manufacturing Company, San Francisco, 
Oakland and Santa Clara. 



MILL WORK 

Dudfield Lumber Co., Palo .'\lto, Cal. 
Pacific Manufacturing Company, San Francisco 
Oakland and Santa Clara. 
MAIL CHUTES 

Cutler Mail Chute Co., Rochester, N. Y. (Se 
Adv. on naee 3S for Coast representatives.) 
MANTELS 

Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran 



MART'.LE 

G. Tomagnini & Co., 



219 Tenth St., San Fr; 



MEDICINE CABINETS 

White Steel Sanitary Furniture Co., rep. by 
Johnson-Locke Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 
METAL AND STEEL LATH 

"Steelcrete" Expanded Metal Lath, sold by 
Holloway Expanded Metal Company, Monad- 
nock Bldg., San Francisco. 
L. A. Norris & Co., 140 Townsend St., San 
Francisco. 
METAL CEILINGS 

San Francisco Metal Stamping & Corrugating 
Co., 2269 Folsom St., San Francisco, 
METAL DOORS AND WINDOWS 

U. S. Metal Products Co., 525 Market St., San 



METAL FURNITURE 

M. G. West Co., 353 :Market St., San Francisco. 
Chas. M. Finch, 311 Board of Trade Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Capitol Sheet Metal Works, San Francisco and 
Oakland. 
METAL SHINGLES 

Meurer Eros., 630 Third St., San Francisco. 
San Francisco Metal Stamping & Corrugating 
Co., 2269 Folsom St., San Francisco. 
MORTAR COLORS 

Dry Mineral Dyes, sold by E. A. liullis & Co. 
(See adv., page 26.) 
OIL liURNKNS 

American Standard Oil Burner Co., Seventh and 

Cedar Sts., Oakland. 
S. T. Johnson Co. (see adv. below). 
Fess System Co., 220 Natoma St., San Fran- 

Con- 




Crude Oil Burners Operating Kitchen Ranges in 

Government Barracks at Fort Winfield Scott 

OIL BURNERS 

Modern EQUIPMENTS for 

Cooking and Heating Plants 

S. T. JOMNSON CO. 

1337 MISSION ST. 94S GRACE AVE. 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 



The Architect and Em/iiiccr 



13 



MADE IN SAN FRANCISCO 

PASSENGER ^FREIGHT ELEVATORS 

INNESTIQATE OUR PRODUCT 

SPENCER ELEVATOR COMPANY 



126-128 Beale Street, SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Kearny 664 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX— Contcnuecf 



ORNAMENTAL IRON AND BRONZE 

American An Metal Works, 13 Grace St., Sa 

Francisco. 
Erode Iron Works. 31-37 Hawthorne St., Sa 

Francisco. 
Burnett Iron Works, Fresno. 
Palm Iron & Bridge Works, Sacramento. 
California Artistic Metal & Wire Co., 349 Sei 

enth St., San Francisco. 
J. G. Eraun, Chicago and New York. 
Ralston Iron Works, 20th and Indiana Sts., Sa 

Francisco. 
Monarch Iron Works, 1165 Howard St., Sa 



C. J. Hillard Company. Inc., 19th and Minne- 
sota Sts., Sain Francisco. 

Shreiber & Sons Co., represented by Western 
Builders Supply Co., San Francisco. 

West Coast Wire & Iron Works, .S61-S63 How- 
ard St., San Francisco. 

A'ulcan Iron Works, San Francisco. 

PAI.NTING AND DECOR.ATING 

n. Zelinskv, 564 Eddv St., San Francisco. 
Robert Swan. 1133 E. 12th St., Oakland. 

PAINT FOR BRIDGES 

Biturine Cnnipanv of America, 24 California 
St.. San Francisco. 

P.\INT FOR CEMENT 

Bay State Brick and Cement Coating, made by 
Wadsworth. Howland & Co. (Inc.). (See Adv. 
in this issue for Pacific Coast agents.) 

"Biturine." sold by Buturine Co. of America. 
24 California St., San Francisco. 

Trus-Con Stone Te.x., Trussed Concrete Steel 
Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

Concreto Cement Coating, manufactured bv the 
Muralo Company, 540 Valencia St., San Fran- 
cisco, 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston. Mass.. agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los -Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

"Technola." a cement paint, sold by C. Roman, 
San Francisco. 

PAINT FOR STEEL STRUCTURES 

"Biturine," sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 

California St., San Francisco. 
Carbonizing Coating. Made by Goheen Mfg. 
Co.. Canton. Ohio. C. W. Cobum & Co., 320 
Market St., San Francisco, and A. J. Capron, 
.■\insworth Eldg., Portland, .Xgents. 
Trus-Con Ear-Ox, Trussed Concrete Steel Co. 
(See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 

PAINTS, OILS, ETC. 

Bass-Heuter Paint Co., Mission, near Fourth 

St., San Francisco. 
Whittier-Coburn Co., Howard and Beale Sts.. 

San Francisco. 
W. P. Fuller & Co., all principal Coast cities. 
"Biturine," sold by Biturine Co. of America, 24 



P.MNTS. OILS, ETC.— Continued. 
California St., San Francisco. 
Standard Varnish Works, 113 Front St., San 
Francisco. 

PAVING BRICK 

California Brick Company, Phelan Eldg., San 
Francisco, 
PHOTO ENGRAVING 

California Photo Engraving Co., 121 Second St., 
San Francisco. 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

R. J. Waters Co., 717 Market St., San Fran- 

PIPE— VITRIFIED SALT GLAZED TERRA 
COTTA 

Gladding, McBean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Pacific Sewer Pipe Co., I. W. Hellraan Bldg., 

Los .-Vngeles. 
Pratt Building Material Co., Hearst Bldg., San 

Francisco. 
Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 
Eldg., San Francisco. 
PL.\STER CONTRACTORS 

.\. Knowles, 985 Folsom St., San Francisco, 
C. C. Morehouse, Crocker Eldg., San Francisco. 
J. J. Connolly & Son, Builders' Exchange, San 



PLUMBERS' MARBLE HARDWARE 

Western Brass Mfg. Co., 217 Tehama St., S. F 
PLUMBING 

Boscus Bros., 975 Howard St., San I'rancisco. 

Scott Co., Inc., 243 Minna St., San Francisco. 

Petersen-James Co., 730 Larkin St., San Frai 
Cisco. 

Wittman, Lyman & Co., 341 Minna St., jo 



Alex Coleman, 706 Ellis St., San Francisco 
PLUMBING FIXTURES. MATERIALS. ETC. 
Crane Co., Second and Erannan Sts., San Fran- 
cisco. 
N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 978 Howard St., San 

Francisco. 
California Steam Plumbing Supply Co., 671 

Fifth St., San Francisco. 
Glauber Brass Manufacturing Company, 1107 

Mission St.. San Francisco. 
J. L. Mott Iron Works, D. H. Gulick, selling 

agent, 135 Kearny St., San Francisco. 
Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Co., 67 New 

^lonlgomery St., San Francisco. 
Western States Porcelain Co., San Pablo, Cal. 
POTTERY 

Steiger Terra Cotta and Pottery Works, Mills 

Eldg., San Francisco. 
PUMPS 

Chicago Pump Company, 612 Howard street, 

San Francisco. 



Pacific= Plate 

BLACKBOARD 



School Supplies 
School Desks 



Auditorium Seating 
School Furniture 



Factorj Prices — San Francisco Service 

THE A. H. ANDREWS CO. 



this magazine. 



14 



The Architect and Eiii^inccr 



Phone Lakeside 91 



National Roofing; Company 

DAMP-PROOFING AND COMPOSITION FLOORING 
EVERYTHING IN ROOFING 

Rooms 206-207 PLAZA BUILDINQ, Fifteenth and Washington Streets, OAKLAND 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX— Continued 



REFRIGERATORS 

McCray Refrigerators, sold by Nathan Dohr- 
mann Co., Geary and Stockton Sts., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Vulcan Iron Works, San Francisco. 
REVERSIBLE WINDOWS 

Hauser Reversible Window Company, Balboa 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
RE\OL\ING DOORS 

Van Kennel Doors, sold by U. S. Metal Prod- 
ucts Co., 525 Market St., San Francisco. 
ROCK BREAKING MACHINERY 

Vulcan Iron Works, Francisco and Kearny Sts., 
San Francisco. 
ROLLING DOORS, SHUTTERS, PARTITIONS. 
ETC 

Pacific Building Materials Co., 523 Market St., 



C. F. Webe 



Co., 365 Market St., Sa 



Kinnear Steel Rolling Doors, W. W. Thurston, 
agent, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 

Wilson's Steel Rolling Doors, U. S. Metal Prod- 
ucts Co., San Francisco and Los Angeles. 
ROOFING AND ROOFING MATERIALS 

Biturine Co. of America, 24 California St., San 
Francisco. 

Grant Gravel Co., Flat Iron Bldg., San Fran- 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

National Roofing Company, Plaza Bldg., Oak- 
land. 

"Ruberoid," manufactured by Paraflfine Paint 
Co., San Francisco. 

Mackenzie Roof Co., 425 15th St.. Oakland. 

United Materials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 



ROOFING TIN 
Meurer Bros., 
Third St., Sa 



A. H. MacDonald, agent, 630 



SAFES, VAULTS, BANK EOUIPMENT 
M. G. West Co., 353 Market St., Sa " 

SANITARY DRINKING FOUNTAINS 
N. O. Nelson Mfg. Co., 97S Howard St, 



Haws' Sanitary Drinking Faucet Co., 1808 Har- 
mon St., Berkeley. 
SANITARY BATH FIXTURE 

"Boudoir" bath tub, mfrd. by Improved Sanitary 
Fixture Co., 411 S. Los Angeles St., Los 
Angeles. Sold by all plumbing houses. 
S.\NITARY KITCHEN SINK 

Improved Sanitary Fixture Company. 411 S. 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles. 
SASH CORD 

Regal Sash Cord. Louisville Selling Co. repre- 
sented on Pacific Coast by Baker & Hamilton. 
Samson Cordase Works, manufacturers of Solid 
Braided Cords and Cotton Twines. SS Broad 
St., Boston, Mass. 
SCENIC PAINTING— DROP CURTAINS. ETC. 
The Edwin H. Flagg Scenic Co.. 1638 Long 
Beach Ave.. Los Anceles 



SCHOOL FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Frat 

Cisco; 512 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 
A. H. Andrews & Co., 728 Mission St., Sa 



SEWAGE EJECTORS 

Chicago Pump Co., represented by Telephone 
Electric Equipment Co., 612 Howard street, 
San Francisco. 

SHEATHING AND SOUND DEADENING 

Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 

SHEET METAL WORK, SKYLIGHTS. ETC. 
Capitol Sheet Metal Works, 1927 Market St., 

San Francisco. 
U. S. Metal Products Co., 525 Market St.. San 
Francisco. 
SHINGLE STAINS 

Cabot's Creosote Stains, sold by Waterhouse & 
Price, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Port- 
land. 
STEEL AND IRON— STRUCTURAL 
Burnett Iron Works, Fresno, Cal. 
Central Iron Works, 621 Florida St., San Fran- 
Dyer Eros., 17th and Kansas Sts., San Fran- 
Brode iron Works, 31 Hawthorne St., San Fran- 

Judson' Manufacturing Co., 819 Folsom St., San 

Francisco. 
Mortenson Construction Co., 19th and Indiana 

Sts., San Francisco. 
J. L. Mott Iron Works, D. H. Gulick, agents, 

135 Kearny St., San Francisco. 
Pacific Rolling Mills, 17th and Mississippi Sts., 

San Francisco. 
Pacific Structural Iron Works, Structural Iron 

and Steel, Fire Escapes, etc. Phone Market 

1374; Home, J. 3435, 370-84 Tenth St., San 



U. S. Steel Products Co., Rialto Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Schreiber & Sons Co., represented by Western 
Builders Supply Co., S. F. 

\'ulcan Iron Works, San Francisco. 

Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Woods & Huddart, 444 Market St., San Fran- 

STEEL PRESERVATIVES 

Biturine Company of America, 24 California 

St., San Francisco. 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co.. Boston Mass. (See 
Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
STEEL BARS FOR CONCRETE 

Kahn and Rib Bars, made by Trussed Concrete 

Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast agencies.) 
Woods & Huddart. 444 Market St.. San Fran- 
cisco. 



CALIFORNIA ARTISTIC METAL & WIRE CO. 

J.T.MCCORMICK- Pnesident^ 

ORNAMENTAL IRON & BRONZE WORK 

349-365 SEVENTH ST. SAN FRANCISCO. 

telephone:: market ziez 



The .Irchitcct and Ein 



15 




"THE BOUDOIR" 

IREG. TRADE MARK) 
Pats. Dec. 1913, Jan. 1915 
The astonishing conven- 
ience and increased comfort 
afforded by "The Boudoir" 
l^ath fixture over the old 
style fixtures have been 
proven, and users even.'- 
where are making the facts 
known. Repeat orders are 
multiplying sales rapidly. 

TEN GOOD reasons: 

LARGER LAVATORY— Used from either side or end. 

ONE FAUCET— Supplies either fixture. 

EXTRA SANITARY— Arrangement of wastepipes. 

EASIER AND SAFER— Support in getting in or out of tub. 

WATER SUPPLY— Operated near bather. 

SHOWER, Shampoo — Refresh with clean water, warm or cold over head and body. 

SAVES ALL — cost of pipes, fittings and labor required for separate lavatory. 

BETTER ARRANGEMENT — Largelavatory accessible, instead of small one in comer. 

SAVES SPACE — A large item; reducing cost, affording additional room, or in- 
creasing space and comfort in any bathroom. 

NEW AND ORNAMENTAL — A valuable attraction in selling or renting homes 
and apartments. 

Sold through the trade. Prompt deliveries from Los Angeles, Cal. or Pittsburg, Pa. 

IMPROVED SANITARY FIXTURE CO. 



Main Office, 411 S. Los Angeles St. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 




Burden Roioitree Pneumatic Door Operating Der, 



BURDETT 
ROWNTREE 
MFG. CO. 



Dumbwaiters 

Door Operating Devices 

Elevator Interlocks 

323 Underwood Building, 
525 Market Street 

Phone Douglas 2S9S 

San Francisco, - - Cal 



Hi 



Norton Elevator Door Clo 



ELEVATOR 
SUPPLY & 
REPAIR CO. 

Elevator Signals 
Elevator Accessories 
Norton Door Closers 

323 Underwood Building, 
525 Market Street 

Phone Douglas 2898 

San Francisco, - - Cal. 



16 



TIic Arcliitcct and Eiii'inccr 



G. TOMAGININI & CO. 

ARTISTIC and INDUSTRIAL MARBLE WORK 

Statuao'. Monuments. Mantels, Architectural Work. Garden and Hall Furniture 
219-239 TENTH ST. Phone Market 8005 SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ARCHITECTS' SPECIFICATION INDEX-Continued 



STEEL MOULDINGS FOR STORE FRONTS 

J. G. Braun, oi5-621 S. Paulina St., Chicago. 111. 
STEEL FIREPROOF WINDOWS 

United States Metal Products Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 
STEEL STUDDING 

Collins Steel Partition. Parrott & Co., San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 
STEEL ROLLING DOORS 

Kinnear Steel Rolling Door Co., W. W. Thurs- 
ton, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco. 
STEEL WHEELBARROWS 

Champion and California steel brands, made bv 
Western Iron Works, 141 Beale St., San Fran- 

STONE 

California Granite Co., 518 Sharon Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

Boise Sandstone Co., Boise, Idaho. 

Raymond Granite Co., Potrero Ave. and Division 
St., San Francisco. 

Colusa Sandstone Co.. Potrero Ave. and Di- 
vision St., San Francisco. 
STORAGE SYSTEMS 

S. F. Bowser & Co., 612 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 
SURETY BONDS 

Globe Indemnity Co., Insurance Exchange Bldg., 
San Francisco. 

T. B. Nabors & Sons, Kohl Bldg.. San Francisco. 

Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, Mills Bldg.. 
San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Casually Co., Merchants' Exchange 
Bldg., San Francisco. 
THEATER AND OPERA CHAIRS 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT 

Telephone Electric Equipment Co., 612 Howard 
St., San Francisco. 
TILES, MOSAICS. MANTELS, ETC. 

California Tile Contracting Company, 206 Shel- 
don Bldg., San Francisco. 

Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco. 
TILE FOR ROOFING 

Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 
Francisco. 

Gladding, McBean & Co., Crocker Bldg., San 
Francisco. 

United M'aterials Co., Crossley Bldg., San Fran- 

TILE WALLS— INTERLOCKING 

Denison Hollow Interlocking Blocks, Ochsner 
Bldg., Sacramento. 
TIN PLATES 

American Tin Plate Co., Riato Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco. 
VITREOUS CHINAWARE 

Pacific Porcelain Ware Company, 67 New Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco. 

Western States Porcelain Co.. Richmond. Cal. 
VACUUM CLEANERS 

Giant Stationary Suction Cleaner, manufactured 
by Giant Suction Cleaner Co., 731 Folsom 
St., San Francisco and Third and Jefferson 
Sts., Oakland. 

Invincible Vacuum Cleaner, R. W. Foyle, 
Asent. San Francisco. 

"Excello" Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, F. W. 
Schaer Bros., Pacific Coast agents, Santa 
Maria Bldg., San Francisco. 

"Tuec" Air Cleaner, manufactured bv United 
Electric Co.. 110 Jessie St.. San Francisco. 

B. & W. Stationary Vacuum Cleaner, sold by 
Arthur T. Riggs, 510 Claus Spreckels Bldg., 
San Francisco. 



VALVES 

Jenkins Bros., 247 Mission St., San Francisco. 
VAL\'E PACKING 
"Palmetto Twist," sold by H. N. Cook Belling 
Co.. 317 Howard St., San Francisco. 
VARNISHES 

W. P. Fuller Co.. all principal Coast cities. 
Glidden Varnish Co., Cleveland, O., represented 
Pacific Coast by Whittier-Coburn Co., 



Sa 



sh Works, 113 Front St., 
'arnish Works, 816 Missioi 



San 



St., 



sold by I. E. Thayer & 
0, and Cent 
nd, Oregon. 



al Do 



Standard V; 

Francisco. 
S. F. Pione. 

San Francisco. 
Moller & Schumann Co., Hilo Varnishes, 1022-; 

Mission St., San Francisco. 
R. N. Nason & Co., San Francisco and Los A 

geles. 
VENETIAN BLINDS, AWNINGS, ETC. 

C. F. Weber & Co., 365 Market St., San Fra 



WATER HEATERS— AUTOM.\TIC 

Pittsburg Water Heater Co. of California. 237 
Powell St.. San Francisco, and Thirteenth 
and Clay Sts., Oakland. 
WALL BEDS 

Marshall & Stearns Co., 1154 Phelan Cklg., San 
Francisco. 
WALL BOARD 
Bishopric Wall 
Co., San Fr 
Lumber Co., '. 
WALL SAFES 

Lowrie Wall Safe, sold by C. Roman Co., 173 
Jessie St., San Francisco. 
WATERPROOFING FOR CONCRETE, BRICK. 
ETC. 

■•Impervile," sold by E. A. Bullis & Co. (Sec 

adv. on page 26.) 
Concreto Cement Coating, manufactured by the 

Muralo Co. (See page 124.) 
Fibrestone & Roofing Co., 971 Howard St., San 

Francisco. 
Imperial Co., 183 Stevenson St., San Francisco. 
Samuel Cabot Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass., agencies 
in San Francisco. Oakland. Los Angeles, Port- 
land, Tacoma and Spokane. 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co., Inc. (See Adv. for 
Coast agencies.) 
WHITE ENAMEL FINISH 

"Gold Seal," manufactured and sold by Bass- 
Hueter Paint Company. All principal Coast 
cities. 
"Satinette," Standard Varnish Works, 113 Front 

St., San Francisco. 
Trus-Con Sno-wite. manufactured by Trussed 
Concrete Steel Co. (See Adv. for Coast dis- 
tributors. 
WINDOWS— REVERSIBLE, ETC. 

Perfection Reversible Window Co., 2025 Market 

St., San Francisco. 
Whitney .-Vdjustable Window Co., San Fran- 
cisco. (See page 25.) 
Hauser Reversible Window Co., Balboa Bldg., 
San Francisco. 
WINDOW SHADES 

Top Light Shade Co., 737 Market St., Oakland. 
WIRE FABRIC 

U. S. Steel Products Co., Rialto Bldg., San 



L. A. Norris Co., 140 Townsend St., San Fran 
Cisco. 
WOOD MANTELS 

Fink & Schindler, 218 13ttl St., San Francisco. 
Mangrum & Otter, 561 Mission St., San Fran 



The Architect and En«;inecr 



\7 




Mrs. Housewife: 

Now, don't say we told you, but tell hubby to bring home a can of Hueter's Linoleum 
Finish and make him varnish the kitchen and the bathroom floors next Saturday night. 
It will be dry Sunday morning and you will find it twice as easy to keep the floor clean, 
besides it tones up the room, makes it look neat and it SAVES THE WEAR OF THE 
LINOLEUM. 

Now, don't just say, "Bring home a can of Varnish," but make him understand that 
he must get 

Hueter's Linoleum Finish 

This is something more than a varnish. It is made to dry quickly— over night— and 
have a durable elastic finish. It is a pale shade and will not change the color of the linoleum; 
simply clean the floor with soap and water and it will always look spick and span. 

We sell Hueter's Linoleum Finish, believe it to be the 
best varnish for linoleum ever made, and we guarantee 
it to give absolute satisfaction. 




BASS-HUETER PAINT CO. 

816 Mission Street 1564 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 



18 



The Architect and Ent^iiiccr 



ROYAL FLUSH VALVES 




are rapidly supplanting all other meth- 
ods of flushing water closets, urinals 
and slop sinks. 

Flushing same quantity of water 
each operation of handle, no waste — 
noiseless. Write for catalog. 

N. O. NELSON MFG. CO. 

steam and Plumbing Supplies 

San Francisco Warehouse and Office: 
978 Howard St., Tel Kearny 4970 

LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO 



C. ROMAN CO. 

SPECIALTY PAINT MANUFACTURERS 

173 JESSIE ST., 0pp. Builders Exchange 

WE MANUFACTURE 

"TECHNOLA" 

A ZINC PAINT containing Cement 

CUB BRAND 

GILSONITE 

QUICK DRYING BLACK 

SHINGLE STAIN 

BARREL HEAD 

FLAT-GLOSS 

LACQUERS 
GRAPHITE 

PASTE, SEMI-PASTE, LIQUID 

RED LEAD PASTE 
NO-DAMP 

WATER PROOFING 

PASTE COLORS 

HOUSE PAINTS 

WASHABLE WALL 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



SCHAER BROS. 

Factor} Representatives 

Exccllo Vacuum Machines 
Eclipse Stoves and Ranges 
RadKe Hot Water Heaters 



We cordially invite you to visit our 
demonstrating room, 

173 JESSIE STREET 

(Ground Floor) 
Opp. Builders' Exchange, near Third Street 

Phone Kearny 472S 



1 he wannest and cleanest school 
in Oakland is the Lazear School, 
at Park and Division Sts., where 
a FESS SYSTEM ROTARY 
CRUDE^ OIL BURNER is 
used. No Smoke, soot or carbon. 
Our burners are also used at the 
Horticulture. California and Ha- 
waiian Buildings at the Expo- 
sition grounds. You can always 
get warm there. 

Fess System 
Company 

Offici' and Factory: 

218-222 Natoma St. 

San Francisco 

ORIGLNATORS of Mechanical 

Atomization of Oil — Not 

IMIT.ATORS 



menticn this niaga 



Tin- Architect and Eii,i^iitccr 19 



"PAINTS 

for Every Purpose" 



PIONEER WHITE LEAD 
FULLER VARNISHES 
WASHABLE WALL FINISH 
PIONEER SHINGLE STAIN 

Are Manufactured by 

W. P. FULLER & CO. 

San Francisco 

Oakland Portland 

Sacramento Seattle 

Stockton Tacoma 

Los Angeles Spokane 

Long Beach Boise 

Pasadena San Diego 

Factories at South San Francisco 



When writing to Advertisers pie 



20 



The Arcliitcct and Eiis;inecr 



FEDERAL ELASTIC 
COMPOUND 

For roofing, repairing leaky gutters, skylights, flashings, etc. for set- 
ting glass and repairing broken panes, — and a hundred other uses. 
Supplied in a plastic form and ready to use — applied with a trowel. 



Guaranteed 10 Years when used on a roof 



E. A. BULLIS & CO. 

Merchants National Bank Bldg., San Francisco 

CEMENT FINISHING PRODUCTS 




Stained with Cabot's 

Shingle Stains 

Bebb (J- Mendel. 

Architects. Seattle. 



You Are Sure of 

Cabot's Creosote Stains 

They have been the standard for more than thirty years. Their colors are soft, rich 
and beautiful, and guaranteed fast. They are made of Creosote, which thoroughly 
preserves the wood, and they contain no kerosene or other cheapener. Accept no 
substitution of unknown stains, because you are sure of CABOT'S. 

SAMUEL CABOT, Inc., Manfg. Chemists, Boston, Mass. 

Cabot's Quill. Waterproof Cement Status. Waterproof Brick Stains. 

Covservo Wood Preservative. Damp- proofing. Waterproofing, Protective Paint, etc. 

i The Pacific Materials Company, San Francisco 
AGENTS ] Tlie Mathews Paint Company, Los Angeles. (Stain). 
( Waterhouse & Price Company, Los Angeles. (Quilt). 



The Architect and Eiiiiinccr 



21 



These Oakland Schools 

Roofed with 

Reinforced Malthoid 

Manual Training and Commercial High 

Schoo I === Including S flops, Dewey School 

McChesney School, Durant School 

These Roofs Made, Laid and Guaranteed by 

The Paraffine Paint Co. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



The ONLY Background that holds Exterior 
Plaster Permanently and Prevents Cracking 



BISHOPRIC 




This shows the construction of 
stucco or plaster board — Dove- 
tail Lath — damp proof mastic- 
fiber board. 



iCCO^ilto 



Made by the Central Door & Lumber Co.. Portland 

STUCCO BOARD— A non-staining spruce 
lath rigidly attached to a fiber board with damp 
proof mastic. ^ Shrinkage Eliminated. 

1. E. THAYER & CO. 

110 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Gal. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

BISHOPRIC WALL BOARD ALSO IN STOCK 



riting to Advertii 



22 



The Architect and Eiii^ineer 



ARCHITECTS -ATTENTION!!! 




For your SANITARY PORCELAIN WARE specify the California product made by 
the WESTERN STATES PORCELAIN CO. at Richmond, Cal., of the highest grade 
clays by most experienced workmen and the latest improved machinery, competing in 
quaUty and prices with the best Eastern goods, thus guaranteeing quick delivery and 
service. Illustrated catalog mailed on request. 

WESTERN STATES PORCELAIN CO. 

HERBERT F. BROWN, President 

Manufacturers of 
PLUMBERS VITREOUS CHINAWARE RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA 



For Sound and Economical Concrete Specify 

\m SAND GRAY[L AND ROCK CO/S 

Sharp Clean Concrete Sand. We carry three sizes 
of Crushed and Screened Concrete Gravel 

Roofing Gravel 



Main Office: 
MUTUAL BANK BUILDING 



704 Market St., SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Douglas 2944 




HANXOCK GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
FACED WITH 60,000 

Red Stock Brick 

Supplied by the 

DIAMOND BRICK CO. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

We Sell 

ARTISTIC CLAY BRICK 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 
Sales Office Telephone 

BALBOA BUILDING Sutter 2987 



please mention this magaz 



The Architect and Engineer 



23 



Established 1902 



••QUALITY COUXTS^^ 



15,000 BOOTH ORNAMENTS 
To Architects and Booth Builders 





Save Time and Money 

v.it!i best results , 

Ornamental Work, 

in Wood, Plaster, Compo, 
"Fibro" and Iron. 

15,000 Stock Models to choose from. 

Mouldings, Capitals. Brackets, Friezes, Coves, Panels, Shields. Urns, etc., etc.. etc. 

Also Special Lighting Fixtures — Standards ^o^i^c", ^?^''^' 

QUICK DELIVERY, whether to order or from stock. 
|)J7 Exclusive Agents — Decorators Supply Co,, Chicago. 

X. Y. Can-ed Mntilding Co. and others 



lYiYiW WESTERN BUILDERS' SUPPLY CO. 

^?^^^^^<">->«i-<g^=a4a'^<> San Francisco, Cal. 



155 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 



Phone Kearnv 1991 



Oi l Safe ty and Saving 

for Your Clients 

When planning a home, power plant, store or any 
building, remember that Bowser Storage Systems 
mean safety and saving in the storing and handling of 
gasolene and oils of all kinds. 

Safe 

Oil Storage 

Systems 

\ni\\e^C.avaati ^ Bowser Outfit keeps all the "Gas" in gaso- 
inineUarage lene sate underground. Keeps the /)otf,.r in 
— dirt and danger out. Saves space in the garage— makes the 
garage truly modern. 

In Farfnrioe Bowser Systems save oil. keep it clean, auto- 
ID raCIOrieS malically measure without containers, save 
floor space, make men thrifty and efficient in the handling of 
oils. Keep premises tidy— cut down oil cost. Economy and 
utility all 'round. 

Bowser information for the architect will be gladly sent upon 
request. No charge— no obligation. Write today. 

S. F. Bowser & Company^ Inc. 

Engineers, Manafactnrers and Original Patentees 
of Oil Handling Devices 

3Q1T2 Thomas St., Fort Wayne, Indiana 
612 Howard St^ San Francisco, CaL 

Telephone — Douglas 432.^ 




For the Factory 



24 



The Architect and Engineer 




R^I'ECTIVE VIEW. OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 
JOHN J. DONOVAN. Supervising Architect 



Equipped throughout with 

RUSSWIN UNIT LOCKS, DOOR 
CHECKS and PANIC EXIT BOLTS 

Furnished by 

MAXWELL HARDWARE CO. 

Washington and Fourteenth Sts. 
OAKLAND CALIFORNIA 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Arclntcct and Engineer 



25 





1 


^^H L.-- - , ' i^--'mmmmmk-mmmmm^m^n 


w 




i 


'■" . '■■ . r 


T' 



Residence as executed by David 
J. Myers. Architect, one of many, 
showing beautiful and artistic 
effects made practical through 
specifying Whitney \\'indo\vs. 

THE WHITNEV' 
WINDOW I 

WM. H. PRINGLE, Mgr. 

TELEPHONE GARFIELD 7956 
522 Sharon Building, San Francisco. 



.o^rx 


Steiger 


/^ w ^Lf^ 


Terra Cotta ^^^ Pottery 


&^ 


Works 


C ^ T^""^ 


Factory; South San Francisco Yard: IBthand Division Sts. 
SAN Mateo Co. San Francisco 


^**,.Fi..*^ 


Main Office: 729 Mills Building 




TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 3010 SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



ENAMELED BRICK 

MAT AND TRANSPARENT GLAZE 



PACIFIC SEWER PIPE CO. 



825 EAST SEVENTH STREET 



LOS ANGELES 



Gladding.I1cBean&Co. 

Manufacturers Clay Products 

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco 

Works, Lincoln.Cal. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine 



26 



The Architect and Engineer 




What is More Troublesome than to Pack Radiator Valves? 

Vou never seem to have tlie right size packing. Because 
there is no active rod trav.jl through the stuffing box the pack- 
ing sets and gets hard, and thi- valves leak more or less when 
opened or closed 

PALME.TTO TWIST 

can hi' imstranded and any size valve packed from one spool. 
It cannot burn — it's all asbestos. Does not get hard — because 

a perfect lubricant is forced into each strand. 

Use PALMETTO TWIST on all the valves, and you will 

not have to repack so often. 

We will send you a sample spool FREE. Just to prove this. 

H. N. COOK BELTING CO.. 

317-319 Howard St.. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



SIMPLEX 
Centrifugal Rotary Crude Oil Burner 

THE ACME OF EFFICIENCY 

IT HAS NO "EQUAL" 

PALACE'orAfAcSmERY AMERICAN STANDARD OIL BURNER CO. 

,5th St. and Ave. H. SUCCESSOR TO 

PANAMA -PACIFIC AUrtERICAN HEAT & POWER CO. 

INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION rL^v-. AMr? r- a. 

SAN FRANCISCO OAK.LANU, CAL. 

See April Number This Magazine 




JOHNSON SERVICE CO. 

(Established 1.SS5) 

The onljf Company in California handling ;ind 
Installing TEMPERATURE REGULATION 
Exclusively. You Deal Direct with the Manu- 
facturers. No other companv can furnish a 
THERMOSTAT only 'iH" long, 2" wide and 1" 
deep, or a SYLPHON RADIATOR CONTROL 
VALVE with- a METAL DIAPHRAGM. 

149-5th St., SAN FRANCISCO 




JOHNSON SVtPHON VALVE 




PACIFIC FIRE EXTINGUISHER CO. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

Heating and Ventilating, Electrical In- 
stallations, Fire Extinguishing Apparatus 

THE GRINNELL AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 

Main Office: so- MONTGOMERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

II7-Z18 Colman Building - - - . - - . . Seattle Wash. 

Branch Offices: n°f 5?' i^''''"n^S"'''''"^ " ------ - Portland Ore. 

Sib Paulsen Building Spokane. Wash. 

5(33 I, W.Hellman Building Los Angeles. Cal. 



When writing to Advertisers please mcnti( 



The Architect and Engineer 



27 



T'UT? FkriT Dl? A 1? PTTTJC r> A TD the only single piece type curb 

IXllly iJ\jLjl5lhJ\SX \j\jiXSi I3i\Xi BAR MADE ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 




SECTIONAL VIEW OF DOLBEAR CURB BAR IN CONCRETE 
SOLID ANCHORAGE — NON-WEDGING — MECHANICALLY PERFECT 

THE AMERICAN STEEL BAR MFG. CO. 

MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BLDG. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

T. CROWE & CO. UNION LIME CO. 



Agents 
Seattle— 411 Globe Bldg. 
Tacoma— 1005 - A Street 
Spokane — So. 164 Madison 
Portland— 45 - 4th St. 



Agents Southern California 
Seventh & Alameda Sts., Los Angeles 

FRED H. FIGEL 

Agent 
San Jose, Calif. 



J.G.BRAUN 

615-621 S. Paulina St., Chicago, 111. 

527=541 W. 35th Street. New York 

carries a complete stock of 

Steel Mouldings for Store Fronts 
Elevator Enclosures, Etc. 

Plain andOrnamental Sash Bars. Leaves. 
Rosettes, Pickets and Ornamental Riv- 
ets, Square Root Angle Iron from .'g in. 
by % in. by '/le in. upwards. 

Square Tubing for Elevators. Elevator 
Enclosures and Office Railings 





Catalog to Architects. Architeclu 
iron Works and Builders 
only on Application 



Patent Sheet Metal Shears Punching Machines 

AH parts, including the main body, are made of forged steel which makes these 
tools far superior to any made from cast steel The Punch Machines are made 
from steel plates. All movable parts are steel forsmjis All parts which can be 
are tempered. The Eccentric piUar blocks are made ^Mthmdependent steel rings. 
Some of these Machmeb aUo have Shears tor cuttmg Angk. Tee or Flat In.ui. 

WRITE rOR CATALOG 
AND PRICES 



OVER 900 
MACHINES 
SOLD 




28 



The Architect and Engineer 




A NATIVE SON BEAR IN SHEET METAL BY 

San Francisco Metal Stamp- 
ing and Corrugating Company 

stamped and Spun 
Sheet Metal Ornaments 

statue Work, Mission Tile, Art Metal Ceilings 



554-556 TREAT AVE., Near Nineteenth St. 



(c 

phones: 

MISSION 2421 
HOME M-3428 



Vulcan Iron Works 

(ESTABLISHFD 1851) 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
AND CAST IRON 
ORNAMENTAL IRON 



ROCK BREAKERS 

BLAKE PATTERN - DODGE PAHERN 




^""iJ" |F''a"<:'Sco and Kearny Streets 
Office i ^^" Francisco, Cal 



The Cutler Mail Chute 


jm. 


Pacific 
Coast 
3 Represen- 
tatives : 


^ 








San Francisco, 






Cal., 






Thomas Day 




\\'.' 


Company. 
Portland, 






Ore. 




r~-^i 


C. W. Boost. 
Seattle and 


1 


i^^rani^R 


Tacoma, 

Wash., 

D. E. Fryer 

&Co. 


m 


Spokane, 


'^ i^H 


Wash. 


Mail Box-L. C. Smith Building 

Seattle. Wash., TOUSLEY. 
Gagg-in A riaerein. Architects, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 


Cutler Mail Chute Co., 


Cutler Building. 


ROCHESTER, N,Y. 




OENAMNTAL 

IR0N6BR0NZE 

5TRVCTVEAL STEEL 

CINCINNATI 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WESTERN BVILMSS SVPPIY CO 

155 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 
LOS ANGELES 

SWEETiER & BALDWIN SAFE CO 
200 EAST 9IS ST 



When writing to Advertisers please mention thi; 



TItc Architect and Eii"inccr 



29 




Isometric view 
of the Oscil- 
lating Portal 
Wall Bed 

showing how 
the same bed 
may be used, 
at will, either 
on the sleeping 
porch or in the 
room. 



Sleeping Porch 



MARSHALL & STEARNS CO., san ,>;«anc,sco^^^_^ oakund 



Idinj! 1774 Broadway 



Geo. H. IMKR President 



R. \V. Dyer. \icr-Pr, 



DYER BROTHERS 

Golden West Iron Works, Inc. 

Structural Iron and Steel Contractors 

ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 



Office and works; 
17th and KANSAS STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Phone ISIarket 134 




CITY HALL, OAKLAND 

Palmer. Hornbostcl & Jones. Architects 

Xew York 

John J. Donovan. Supervising Architect 

G. F. Ashley. Superintendent 

Imperial Waterproofing was used in 
the cement plaster and floor topping of 
basement, by the Roebling Construc- 
tion Co. 

Note. — Also in three of the buildings 
shown in the surrounding group the 
material has been used. 

WE SPECIALIZE 



Above Ground — Under Ground 

ASSUME ALL RESPONSIBILITY 

GUARANTEE RESULTS 

IMPERIAL COMPANY 

Builders Exchange Building 
183 Stevenson St. San Francisco 



30 



The Archilcct and Iliminc 



A Few Plain Facts 

About Durable Iron 

The American Rolling Mill Com- 
pany was the first to develop a pro- 
cess by which pure and durable iron 
could be produced by modern, labor- 
saving methods. 

Ever since that time it has labored 
unceasingly to improve the quality 
of its product. 

It has maintained for years the 
best equipped Research Department 
in the world for the study of iron 
and steel in reference to corrosion. 

It has by far the greatest invest- 
ment in the form of a reputation lor 
producing durable and worliable iron 
tliat anywhere exists. 

Now luirity is immensely important 
in relation to durabilitj', but there are 
many other qualities that have a di- 
rect effect on rust-resistance, and 
which cannot be determined by chem- 
ical analysis. A high degree of skill 
and care in all the processes of manu- 
facture exercised by experienced men 
long accustomed to produce quality 
iron, a severity of inspection unknown 
to the trade at large, and close at- 
tention to many details, the import- 
ance of which has been established 
hy research, all contrit)ute to the pro- 
duction of iron of genuine quality. 
It would be much easier and cheaper 
to neglect all these things and to cen- 
ter the attention of the Operating 
Department on those qualities which 
ma.v be measured in the finished pro- 
duct. The American Rolling Mill 
Company, however, is not going to 
allow its huge investment in reputa- 
tion to be impaired or destroyed by 
indifference to any of the elements 
of permanence, but will strive to in- 
crease its value by continuing to pro- 
dtice the best material on the nrarUet 
for corrosion resistance. 



is. and will continue to be, the stand- 
ard for long service in exposed situa- 



ARMCO -American Ingot-iron 

11 continue to 
iig service in < 





\\/^/ 


The 


rade\ / mark AEMCO 


c.irnes 






ringf thnt mark is manufac- 




Tlie American Rolling Mill 


(. (.iiipri! 


y with the skill, intelligence 




,ity associated with its prod- 




l hence can be depended up- 


i-n to p 


ississ in the highest degree 


1: - lur: 





The AMERICAN ROLLING 
MILL COMPANY 



the : 

IMlUCt.^ 



ipaii 



ARMCO — American Ingot Iron Boof- 

ing. Pipe, Gutter, Terne Plate 

and Metal I.atli. 

MIDBIiETOWN, OHIO 

District Sales Offices 

New York Chicago Pittsburg 

Detroit St. Louis Cleveland 



-r/T"^^^ 




it 

ain ! 

Concrete and 
stucco walls 
painted with 
BAY STATE Coating are 
proof against rain and 
snow. Water can't seep 
through the walls. 

Bay State 

Brick and Cement 

Coating 

is lasting as well as waterproofing. 
Keeps walls from hair-cracking— 
protects metal work. Gives an 
artistic effect, an attractive dull 
surface, in white or color, without 
marring the texture of cement. 

If you're planning 

a house of concrete, we'd like yott 
to see our booklet. It's free. And 
upon request we'll send you sample 
can of Bay State Brick and Cement 
Coating and color card. 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND & CO., Inc. 

Paint and Varnish Makers 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Distributing Agents 

R.N.NASON& CO.. 54 Pine St.. San Francisco 
and 1047 South Main St.. Los Angeles. Gal. 

F. T. CROWE & CO.. Portland. Ore.; Spokane. 
Seattle, Tacoma, Wash.; Vancouver. B. C. 

JONES-MOORE PAINT HOUSE, San Diego, 
Cal. 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magazine. 



The Architect and Engineer 



31 



p. Noble. Pn 



> BoNNEAU Noble. Vice-Pr. 



Thomas Rolph, Sec'y 



f artftr SnUtug Miil (Ha. 



SUPPLIERS OF 



Structural Steel, Forgings, Bolts, Rivets, 
Frogs, Switches, Cast Iron Castings 



General Office and Works 
17th and MISSISSIPPI STS. 
Telephone Market 215. also Co 



SAN FRANCISCO 

:ing City Offices 



City Offices 
216-217 SHARON BUILDING 

Telephone Sutter i^.S,? 




A. A. DEVOTO, PRESIDENT 



ICC AND works: 621-651 FLORIDA St. 
EN Harrison and Bryant. ISth and 1£ 
San Francisco. Calif 



W. B. MORRIS, Preside 



H. M. WRIGHT. Vice-Preside 



L. J. GATES. Secretary 



Western Iron Works 

STRUCTURAL IRON and 
STEEL CONTRACTORS 



Gas Holders, Vault Linings, Jails, Fire Escapes, Beams, Channels, Angles 
and Steel Wheelbarrows Carried in Stock 



SANfRANCISCO,CAL 



W. R. BRODE. Pres. 



R. J. BRODE. \ice.Pres. 



LOUIS R. HOL.M, Sec't> 



BRODE IRON WORKS 

Established 1886 Incorporated 1913 

Fabricators and Contractors of Structural Steel 

and 

ORNAMENTAL IRON WORK 

Telephone Kearny 2464 

31 to 37 HAWTHORNE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Between Howard and Folsom Sts., East of Third Street 



When writing to Advertisers please mention this magaz 



The Architect and Engineer 



TELEPHONE. MISSION 1763 HOME PHONE. J 2376 

C. J. HILLARD CO., Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Bank and Office Railings. Elevator Enclosures and Cars. 

Cast Iron Stairs and Store Fronts. Wire Work. Fire Escapes. 

Nineteenth and Minnesota Sts. c r- /-- i 

Nfxt to California Canneric. ^sn T rancisco, Lai. 



Telephone Mission 5230 

Ralston Iron Works, Inc. 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
Ornamental Iron Worl^ 

Twentieth and Indiana Sts. San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Main 322 

The Palm Iron and Bridge Works 

INCORPORATED 

STRUCTURAL STEEL 
ORNAMENTAL IRONWORK 

15th and R Streets - SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



MERRIT IRONING BOARD 

THE attention of architects and owners is called to the 
exceptional merits of the Merrit Ironing Board, the 
latest improvement in folding ironing boards. This 
ironing board has given genuine satisfaction wherever 
it has been installed. It is very rigid, strong and simple. 
Send for Descriptive Circular and Price List to 

MERRIT IRONING BOARD COMPANY 

1715 21 MISSION STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO 



When writing to .\dvertiscrs please 



The Architect and Einrtnccr 



33 




SPECIFY THE COLONIAL 
HEAD THROATand DAMPER 

THE BEST DEVICE FOR OPEN FIREPLACES 
SEE SWEETS INDEX PAGES— 1702-3 

SOLD ON THE PACIFIC COAST BY 

MfgCo. HigginsBldg., Los Angeles PDinMIAI 

D.O. Church San Francisco *:''-' LUIN lAL 

Scott. Lyman & Stack Sacramento FIREPLACE 

D. E. Frver & Co. Seattle COM P A N Y 

\Vm. N. 0-Neil & Co Vancouver. B. C. ^ 

M J. Walsh Co. Portland. Ore. "CHICAGO:: 



CRANE 

COMPANY 


High Grade . . . 

PLUMBING 
SUPPLIES 

Steam and Hot ^iVater Heating 

PIPE. VALVES, FITTINGS 


Second & Brannan Sts. 
SAN FRANCISCO 


Power Plant and Water Works Materials 

STEAM SPECIALTIES 



CAllfORNIA ST[AM AND PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 

PIPE, VALVES AND FITTINGS office and warebo.se : 

FOR 671-679 FIFTH STREET 

STEAM, GAS, WATER AND OIL corner biuxo^c 



CO.>\F>UETE STOCK OF? 

The Kelly & Jones Company Products 

\VRITE ROR CATAUOGU'E 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Telephone Sutter 737 









Motts 

Plumbing 

Fixtures 




THE J. L. MOTT 
IRON WORKS 

1828— Eighty Seven Years of Supremacy— 191. > 

SHOWROOMS 135 Kearny Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Douglas 1786 D. H. Gulick, Sales Agt. 









34 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 




CO 





■OB o^ 



03 oS 

O 1^ 



Z, 

< o 

o « 

Lh C 3 



c» 



^^ 



Q 

l-H 



5 ii 



O 



Z, 

< 

Oh 

o 

05:3 



e2 


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a 

3 

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C/3 a; 




2f^ 




" 03 




(So 




H-I 

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z 



h-1 



Tlic .Irchitcct and Engineer 




Cement of Uni- 
form Quality 



O 




,UR CEMENT is SUPERIOR in 
QUALITY to any other cement 
manufactured. We give the fill- 
ing of orders our most prompt attention. All CEMENT is carefully 
tested before leaving our factories. A trial order will convince you 
of these facts. 

Santa Cruz Portland Cement Co. 

Works at Davenport, Cal. Capacity, 10,000 Barrels Daily 

Standard Portland Cement Corp. 

Works at Napa Junction, Cal. Capacity 2,500 Barrels Daily 

General Office, Crocker Building, San Francisco 

Telephone, Douglas 800 



PLUMBING FIXTURES 

are no Better than the BRASS GOODS with which Ihey are equipped 

Are YOU unconsciously lessening the VALUE of Plumbing 
Installations in YOUR buildings and jeopardizing your repu- 
tation by specifying "unreliable" short service LEAKY 
FAUCETS.? 

Reiiember, CI AUBER Faucets odd VALUE to en 
lustallalion. NEVER LEAK. J.l YEARS ILIE BEST 

GLAUBER BRASS MFG., Cleveland, Ohio 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH, 1107 MISSION STREET 



PIERCE HARDWARE CO. 

Broadway, bet. Twelfth and Thirteenth Streets, OAKLAND 



OAKLAXD AGENTS FOR 



Telephone Oakland 22 



Corbin Finish Hardware 

Also Agents for Building Papers, Nails, Paints, Oil, 

Varnishes and a full line of other Building Materials 



36 



The Architect and Enzineer 



Ever Have Trouble With Your 
Furnace or Retort? 

The fault is not always with 
the Workmanship, sometimes it's 
the material. 

Specify "Livermore" when 
you use Fire Brick or Fire 
Clay Products of any kind and 
})ou can depend upon the quality 
being there. Special shapes and 
sizes made to order. Standard 
sizes carried in stock- 

LIVERMORE FIRE BRICK CO. 



LIVERMORE, 



CALIFORNIA 




STEEL TANKS COATED 

WITH 

BITURINE 

CANNOT RUST (inside and out) 

White House — O'Connor & Moffatt — Eastman Kodak 

Holbrook, Merrill & Stetson — Commercial — Flood Bldgs. 

TANKS ALL COATED. 

24 California St., San Francisco Kearny 4478 




THE KINNEAR MFG. CO. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

STEEL ROLLING FIREPROOF 

DOORS AND SHUTTERS 

Agents 
Seattle - Portland - Los Angeles = Salt Lake City 

San Francisco Office 517 Rialto Building 



"FIRE — A CRIME" 

We are equipped with two Pacific Coast Factories to manufacture 
METAL DOORS— Tin. Kalamein, Composite. Hollow Steel and Bronze,— Swinging, 

Sliding, Folding, Elevator, Van Kannel Revolving Doors, and Wilson's Steel 

Rolling Doors. 
METAL WINDOWS — Underwriters, Hollow Metal of all kinds, Kalamein, Bronze 

and Steel Sash jp^- See the SIMPLEX METAL WINDOW. 

UNITED STATES METAL PRODUCTS CO. 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST 
525 Market St., San Francisco 750 Keller St., Los Angeles 

Agents and Branches in all Coast Cities. 



The Architect and Engineer 



US of Subscription. of California 

.fl.SO per Year 

Pacific Coast States 

Issued monthly in 1 



PAGE 



Contents for March 

ENTRANCE, OAKLAND TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL - Frontispiece 

John J. Donovan and Henry Hombostel, Associate Architects 
RECENT SCHOOL BUILDINGS IN OAKLAND ... 39 

B. J. S. Cahm, A. I. A. 
PROBLEMS THAT HAVE BEEN SOLVED IN OAKLAND'S NEW 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS 42 

John J. Donovan, Architect 

WHO IS TO BLAME? 71 

J. F. Schmidt 

SAFETY FIRST IN HOSPITAL BUILDINGS 73 

A. W. Eckherg 
OFFICIAL MINUTES, FEBRUARY MEETINGS OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO CHAPTER, A. I. A. 77 

BASIS OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN DESIGN OF REINFORCED 

CONCRETE STRUCTURES - - 80 

C. A. P. Turner, C. E. 
THE DAVENPORT HOTEL, SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 83 

PROFESSIONAL AND OTHER INCOMPETENCE - - 89 

W. B. FaviUe, F. A. L A. 
NOTES ON EFFECT OF EARTHQUAKE SHOCK TO BUILDINGS, 02 

Octavius Morgan, F. A. I. A. 
ECONOMIC WASTE OF ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITIONS AS 

USUALLY CONDUCTED AND WHO PAYS FOR IT 95 

J. E. Allison, A. I. A. 
SUGGESTIONS FOR LIGHT CONCRETE FLOOR CONSTRUCTION 

IN CONCRETE HOUSES f»8 

MUton Dana Morrill, Architect 



EDITORIAL 

WITH THE ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS 
REVIEW OF RECENT BOOKS 
HEATING AND LIGHTING 

STATE, COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING 
(Index to .Xilvertisements. Page 8). 



104 
106 
111 
112 

118 



THE 



Architect and Engineer 



Of California 

Pacific Coast States 



Vol. XL. 



MARCH, 1915 



g ^.:-. ■ 



No. 3. 



iiTii i i 




E^'TRA^'CE. LOCKWOOD SCHOOL. OAKLAXH 
John J. Donovan and Leu'is P. Hobart, Associate Architects 

Recent School Buildings in Oakland 

By B. J. S. C.\HILL, A. I. A. 

CITIES are like people. Each has characteristics of its own. And like 
human beings, cities are not without their foibles and failings, their virtues 
and their points of excellence. One of the common weaknesses of human 
nature is to take particular pride in some accomplishment in which after all we 
are not as strong as we would like to be. And just as often we are prone to over- 
look good points easily conceded by everybody but ourselves. We architects, 
for instance, are all familiar with the man who is a born artist but who takes 
particular pride in proving that, really, he is a keen business man before every- 
thing. And we know the hard-headed constructionist who poses as a judge of 
paintings. 

Chicago and Pittsburg, knowing their strength in pork and pig iron seem 
ashamed of it and would infinitely rather be remembered by their art institutes 
and symphony societies than famed for their stock yards or foundries. 

San Francisco is known all over the world as a rather naughty, free and 
easy sort of place. That is why all the world delights to show a friendly affec- 
tion for us by calling the town "Frisco." But we who live here and make the 
city, show the utmost horror for this sporty and familiar nickname. We insist 
on the solemn and saintly "San Francisco." For a people who are in the habit 
of calling their mayor and president "Jim" and "Teddy," this pernickerty ob- 
jection to "Frisco" has ahvays seemed to me a foible, a human one to be sure, 
but a foible just the same. 



40 The Architect and Em^iiieer 

Xow, the main foible of the city of Oakland, if we may endow that city with 
human qualities, seems to be in her desire to be known as a self-sufficing 
metropolis. There may be something of destiny in these aspirations, but a 
rather overloaded insistence on them does not impress the stranger. On the 
other hand, Oakland has achieved a success and a distinction on other lines that 
have never been sufficiently emphasized. No city in the West in comparison 
with its population has spent so much time, thought and money on its public 
school system and school buildings. 

Nearly a generation ago Oakland built the then finest high school on the 
coast ; and in the writer's memory one wave of school building activity has suc- 
ceeded another, each involving more money, more enterprise and more applied 
ingenuity than the last, until, it is safe to say, Oakland stands better served in 
this respect, perhaps, than any city in the country. 

The present moment sees the culmination of this activity in the realization 
of over twenty new school buildings projected on the bond is,sue of 1911, in 
which nearly three million dollars was voted for this great undertaking. The 
whole of this work was put into the hands of Architect John J. Donovan, who 
may be said to have epitomized the dynamic intent of the school department 
and to have infused the necessary unity of will and purpose into the various 
joint enterprises in which other distinguished architects were invited to col- 
laborate. The remarkable results of these successive enterprises in which Mr. 
Donovan led with progressive partners is shown pictorially in a series of photo- 
graphs here fo'lowing. 

Any one familiar with the old style gaunt school house- will see at a glance 
that here we have something most decidedly different. And let us add quickly 
that mere difference is in itself no merit. If a thing is well done, to do it differ- 
ently may be merely to do it indifferently. The only valid excuse for change 
should, of course, be change for the better. It will not take long to come to a 
decided conclusion on this score. 

The most remarkable characteristic of the aggregate work here shown as 
distinguished from' the school architecture of an earlier epoch, consists undoubt- 
edly in the honest use of good material in simple and suitable fonns rather than 
in using cheap material in pretentious and pompous make-believe. And in this 
one particular we are inclined to think the new school houses are abundantly 
justified. The object of the common school in this or any land is to train 
children to grow into worthy men and women and good citizens. The impres- 
sion of the school house on young and tender minds may reasonably be assumed 
as the very first impressions of an abiding character made on children when 
they leave the home and nursery. It is the first impression of the great outer 
world. Ne.xt to the home itself no other influence will ever be so permanent. 
Whatever else we forget in after life, we remember our school and our school 
days. One cannot but feel that an enormous sub-conscious influence must be 
exerted on the whole of one's life by the impressions conveyed fronr the school 
house. The child that passes daily along dark and dirty corridors, or who plays 
on rickety wooden steps, who sees dilapidated orders imitated in mill work or 
sheet metal, who sees nothing true and genuine during school hours, must be 
■affected unfavorably for all his years to come. The boy or girl, on the other 
hand, who treads steps of granite or brick, whose eye rests on real stonework 
and real red tiles rather than painted tin ones, who learns to associate the charm 
of a beautifully designed school court with the honesty and sincerity of natural 
and simple materials — such a boy or girl must inevitably grow up with more 
wholesome and worthy ideals than could be possible from association with 
painted, mill-made shams of the old style wooden schools of the cheap and 
trivial attempts at near-classic, so often done without a trace of sympathy, 
honesty or sense. 



MAIN FLOOR PLAN. 
OAKLAND. CALlFORNL't. 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL, 
lohn }. Domnan and 
Henry Hornhoslcl, 
Associate Architects. 





OAKLAND TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL. OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA. 



42 The Architect and EiiL^incer 

Especial stress is laid on the use of good material well and substantially put 
together from designs that have quality and intelligence. There is need in this 
age of early association with whatever is sound and abiding rather than with 
things that are cheap and transitory. It is a national need of the hour and 
cheap at any price we can pay for it. 

Problems That Have Been Solved in Oakland's New 
School Buildings 

B.v JOHN J. DONOVAN, Architect. 

ON May 16, 1911, the City of Oakland voted $2,393,900 in bonds for the 
erection of new school buildings at various points throughout the city. 
On February 12, 1912, the writer was appointed architect for the 
City of Oakland, having a contract with the city to perform all architectural 
services in connection with the construction of new buildings. 

Due to the loss of time between the date of the election and the appointment, 
and the important need of the completed buildings on account of the crowded 
conditions of the old buildings, the Commissioner of Public Works, Mr. Harry 
S. Anderson, and myself deemed it advisable that other architects be invited 
to associate with me in order that the preliminary work might be expedited and 
the buildings made ready and relieve the congestion. In view of this the writer 
invited several architects to associate with him, and it is my great pleasure at 
tliis time to give full credit to all the gentlemen connected with me in the work. 

From February 12, 1912, extending through some months, a very exhaustive 
preliminary study was made by an advisory committee appointed by the Board 
of Education. This body was composed of the leading men and women in 
educational work not only on the Pacific Coast but elsewhere. This committee, 
in conjunction with the writer, compiled and segregated data and put it in a 
workable formi. Upon the completion of the buildings it is remarkable that the 
data has been followed almost implicitly, and the results show the advisability 
of the appointment of this commission. 

The uppermost thought during the preliminary work was to achieve with 
the funds available pleasing types of school buildings, buildings which would be 
inviting to the pupils and free from any of the prison-like effects which char- 
acterize many of our old school buildings, and at the same time meet the school 
requirements in all matters and details. Furthermore, we strove to have the 
buildings fit the lots. 

Particular care and attention was given to the orientation of the class rooms, 
placing them so that simshine entered these rooms at some time of the day. 
The favorable points of the compass in this locality are the east, west and south, 
respectively, and in that order. 

The playground with relation to the school building was carefully considered 
and unless there was a very large area of school playground the building was 
placed so that very little shade fell upon the playgroimd. This meant that our 
buildings would have, as nearly as we could arrange it, a southern exposure for 
the playgrounds. 

It will be noted that many of the buildings shown in the illustrations are one 
story in height, a new type for this part of the country, and a type which, un- 
fortunately, has been adopted by many sections of the State without much con- 
sideration. In the first place the one-story type of school was the result of a 
clamor on the part of many people momentarily active in school work who 
knew little or nothing about the subject ; mostly nothing, and their influence was 
.^uch as to predominate the thought in many instances, thereby having an in- 



The .Architect and Eir'inccr 



43 




44 



TIic Architect and Engineer 




MAIN ENTRANCE, EMERSON SCHOOL, OAKLAND, CALIF0RNL4 
JOHN J. DONOVAN una JOHN GALEN HOWARD, ASS0CL4TE ARCHITECTS 



The Architect ami Eiii^iiiccr 



45 




PRIXCIPAL'S OFFICE. E.MERSOX SCHOOL. 0.4KL.4XD 
John J. Donovan and John Galen Howard, .4ssociate .-irchilccts 




^f.^.\•u.-^L tr.4imsg room, emerso.\' school, o.ikland 



46 



The Arcliitcct and Engineer 




PATIO, EMER.^UX SCHOOL. OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan and John Galen Hou-ard. Associate Archi: 




PATIO, SHOinXG OPENNESS OF CLASS ROOMS. EMERSON SCHOOL. OAKLAXD 



The Arcfutcct and Engineer 47 

iluence on the design and arranoenients and, of course, responsible for certain 
conditions resulting therefrom. 

In writing frankly I believe that those who read this article can be benefited 
by the experiences gained, and I am only too pleased to impart the results of 
these experiences in order that the mistakes of the past may be minimized in the 
work of the future. 

Regardless of what strides we may have made I know that the milleniuni 
in this work has not been reached and that there is room for improvement and 
enlargement, better conditions, better buildings, better mentalities for the school 
children, teachers and boards, and, last but not least, for the architects who 
have the work to perform^. 

In brief, the one-story school building is a success where there is plenty of 
land available and ample provisions can be made for protected playroom space, 
so that children may play under cover during inclement weather and play with 
comfort. The one-story building prohibits this unless girls' and boys' play- 
rooms are incorporated in the design as separate buildings, connected, of course, 
to the school. Substitutes for these are the assembly halls and corridors, all of 
which are not advisable. This also applies to two-story buildings as well, 
unless a scheme is adopted such as is illustrated in the Oak Park School at 
Sacramento. This feature is mentioned further on. 

A requirement demanded by the citizens and which has proven to be a 
remarkable success is the semi-open-air classroom. This problem has been 
solved and solved in such a way as to enable the classroom to be closed during 
inclement weather. During favorable weather one side of the room may be 
slmost entirely open. This has been accomplished by the use of a window 
which revolves in a horizontal plane to an angle of more than ninety degrees. 
With shades on the underside of the sash and the sash open at an angle of about 
thirty degrees direct sunshine is excluded. Usually there are three sashes in 
each frame, directly over each other, and the opening of the three sashes, with 
the shades attached thereto, excludes the direct sunshine and at the same time 
furnishes sufficient open areas for fresh air. Coupled with these are transome 
placed near the ceiling, on the opposite side of the room, opening into the corri- 
dors or arcades, thereby affording means of obtaining good, natural ventilation. 

To the city officials belongs the credit of engaging a heating and ventilating 
expert, also an electrical engineer, who worked under the directions of the 
architect, and in consequence of this the schools of the City of Oakland are 
splendidly equipped in these two branches of their construction. 

The heating system installed is the direct and indirect: that is, a series of 
radiators placed near the windows, supplying sufficient heat to warm the rooms 
during late fall and early spring and many days in the winter. The plenum 
system, which has been installed in every school building, furnishes tempered 
fresh air in conjunction with the radiators during very cold, dismal days. On 
these days it is necessary, in order to have the system work as perfectly as pos- 
sible, for the windows and transoms to be closed. The air furnished by the fans 
is drawn from the roof and from certain elevations above the ground, high 
enough to eliminate the suction of dust. In many instances air washers have 
been installed, so that when the windows are closed we feel quite assured that 
clean, fresh air is forced into the classrooms, and the hygienic and healthful 
condition of the children in the new schools show a marked improvement over 
the old. In many of the old schools wretched conditions prevailed, not only in 
the plumbing, but in the heating and ventilating arrangements. Apparently 
no attempt was made to provide proper locations for fresh air intakes and poor 
methods were provided for the handling of this air after it was drawn in by the 
fans. The writer remembers one particularly striking instance of visiting a 



48 



The .ircliitcct and Ens;iiiccr 




AXOTHER riEir OF PATIO. EilERSO\ SCHOOL, OAKLAXD 



school of the old type (not so very old in years) in company with the depart- 
ment doctor and three other officials, and finding that over thirty-three per cent 
of the children in the classroom were affected by throat or nasal trouble and 
that many had been absent from school during two of the winter months 
previous to the time of our visit. The teacher informed us that that was a 
common condition throughout the winter months of the year, indicating fully 
that the hot air furnace left its mark wherever it was installed. This statement 
was confirmed by six of the other teachers in this particular school. 

Briefly stated, the other equipments, such as lighting, plumbing and black- 
boards have been studied with much care and consideration. 

The lighting and illvuninating engineering for evening courses was re- 
peatedly tested for proper location of lamps in the class rooms, and examination 
will show that the outlets were placed without regard for symmetry with the 
axes of the room. The outlets nearest the teachers' desks have been located so 
that a pupil in the rear seat may read the writing on the blackboard back of 
the teacher's desk without the rays of the light directly entering the eye. Fur- 
thermore, the outlets have been placed so that as much light as possible is to 
the left of the pupil. Of course, this is impossible to accomplish with the seats 
nearest the windows, but generally the illumination on the desk is such as to 
eliminate a left hand shade. Direct lighting, with frosted globes, has been used 
throughout. 

A word on the ])lumbing may not be amiss in that this has been the least 
considered subject in most of the previous work, although it is one of great 
importance. The old latrine for watercloset and urinal uses has been aban- 



Tlic Architect and Einiiiiccr 



49 




FRONT riElV OF McCHESNEY SCHOOL. O.-IKLA.W 
John J. Donovan, Architect 





pBBWB^Wi 



REAR riEU- OF McCHESNEY SCHOOL. OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan, Architect 



50 



The Architect and Engineer 




AL'Un ORIVM. AUCHESXEV SCHUUL. U.-l h :..^ \ i' 




TERRACE, McCHESNEY SCHOOL. OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan, Architect 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 51 

iloned and in its place are the individual vitreous china waterclosets and urinals, 
both ventilated into the utility chamber. The toilet rooms are ventilated 
through the fixtures into this utility chamber, which is connected by ducts to an 
exhaust fan, exhausing the foul air above the roof. 

All toilet rooms are placed so as to obtain as much sunshine as possible. 
These rooms are supplied with air from the open windows. Inasmuch as the 
vents through the fixtures are near the floor level there is no cause for foul air 
passing the faces of the pupils. The system and method has proven very 
satisfactory and quite sanitary. 

We have made it a point to install slate blackboards wherever our funds 
would permit it, and nearly ninety per cent of the schools are thus equipped. 
The cost is about thirty-three to thirty-five cents per square foot, against twelve 
to fifteen cents per square foot for imitation, but the advantages gained are 
several hundred per cent over the use of the imitation slate. I cannot state too 
strongly that the use of imitation or composition blackboards is a detriment to 
good and graceful handwriting. It is a pleasure for a child to write on a slate 
blackboard, while it is a laborious task to write on imitation. In the first place, 
chalk moves over slate without much friction, while on the other hand the chalk 
is retarded and the labor is great when there is much writing. Therefore, I 
heartily recommend to all concerned the slate blackboard. 

The interior painting and coloring has been kept simple and cheerful, using 
soft, light tints on the walls and ceilings, mostly bufT in color for the walls, and 
for the ceilings a flat, white egg-shell tone. 

Inasmuch as the photographs tell most of the story a few of the buildings 
will be described but briefly. 

The Oak Park school at Sacramento is a twenty-three classroom building, 
containing an assembly hall, with a seating capacity of eleven hundred, a 
branch library and reading room, kindergarten, with an open hedge terrace, 
boys' and girls' shower and toilet rooms, laboratory, wood-working room, and 
on the north at the second floor are boys' and girls' open playrooms. The floors 
of these latter rooms are waterproofed to protect the classrooms below. In 
observing the plan it is notable that all classrooms face east and north, the 
majority on the east. This was a requirement of the Board of Education of 
Sacramento, due to the intense heat of that section during the summer. 

There are play-yards for the older boys and girls on the east and west, 
.uifificiently large to permit games of baseball and basketball, and interior play- 
grounds for the smaller boys and girls. 

Between the arcade connecting the assembly hall and the library and the 
center pavilion are experimental gardens, which serve a very good purpose in 
the study of horticulture and agriculture, subjects which are taught extensively 
in the interior towns and cities. 

The structure is of reinforced concrete, trimmed with red tapestry brick 
with spots of color produced by terra cotta tile. It is crowned with a red 
Mission tile roof. This school represents an investment of $225,000.00. 

The Oakland Technical High School, or what was originally known as the 
Manual Training and Commercial High School, consists of a group of build- 
ings. The southeast pavilion is devoted to commercial work, such as bookkeep- 
ing, stenography, etc. The pavilion south of the assembly hall is devoted to 
class-rooms for the academic studies. The first pavilion north of the assembly 
hall and connected thereto is the Science Department. The northeast pavilion 
is assigned to Home Economics, and the northwest pavilion in the first group 
contains the drafting rooms for mechanical, architectural and free-hand 
drawing. 



Tlic Architect and Engincci' 




The Architect and Engineer 53 

The group of four buildings' to the west of this latter group and connected 
by an arcade includes the eight shops. They are, in order, the machine shop, 
forge shop, foundry, electrical shop, carpenter shop, plumbing and metal shop, 
cabinet and pattern shop, and are complete in every detail and equipped with 
the most modern machinery. It is intended that these shop buildings shall have 
a wider use than day school instruction. The Board of Education at the 
present time is preparing a curriculum for evening instruction to the apprentices 
of the various trades. The unlimited possibilities of the uses of these buildings 
crowd each other out of place. For instance, besides instruction on mechanical 
work the probability is that the student-apprentice will have many opportunities 
to satisfy any desires for advancement into the theories, physics and chemistry 
of his work. 

The plot plan shows the campus to the west of the group, with the gym- 
nasium on the side. 

The building just completed is most splendidly equipped. The arrange- 
ments are such that the various departments are free from confusion during 
the arrival and departure to and from the class rooms. Numerous stairways 
have been placed to assist in this freedom from congestion. 

These buildings are of reinforced concrete, trinmied with polychrome terra 
cotta, and the effect is stupendous in viewing the building from the east, with 
its facade over eight hundred feet long, screened with engaged columns ; and, 
at the same time, these columns obstruct no light from the classrooms. A 
notable result is attained from the reflected light emitted from that surface of 
the columns presumably in shade. 

The exterior plastered surfaces have been painted with a concrete paint of a 
soft, warm tone, which, together with the polychrome terra cotta has created 
an effect which is simple and interesting. 

I wish to give credit to Mr. Henry Hornsbostel, of New York, for his work 
on this building. He collaborated and assisted in the preliminary drawings, 
and, as usual, the conceiJtion is of merit. 

The Clawson School, which is illustrated, is of more recent design, and 
incorporates many salient features, which have been worked out in close col- 
laboration with the school authorities. The assembly hall has been made suf- 
ficiently large and arranged so that it is easily converted into a gymnasium, 
with the lockers and showers to the rear of the assembly hall and at the ground 
floor. Thus the locker rooms and showers will also serve the schoolyard, which 
is one of the public playgrounds. 

In arranging the class rooms of this building the east and west lights have 
been adhered to. 

This is a three-story building and was designed as such so as to provide 
sheltered playgrounds in the basement. These playrooms are open on the east, 
giving a flood of light and fresh air to these places. 

It is a composition reinforced concrete structure, trimmed with architectural 
terra cotta and varicolored buff face brick. 

The classrooms in this building have been changed from the others in size 
to 22 feet 6 inches in width by 31 feet 6 inches in length, it having been found 
that regardless of the purpose to limit the size of the classrooms, additional 
seats, due to crowding, have been worked in. The previous size of classrooms 
was 20 feet 6 inches by 31 feet purposely made so in order to limit the number 
of seats to forty. It has been found, however, that the arlditional two feet will 
give better seating and aisle conditions and very slightly increasing the cost 
of the building. 

The cost of this building when completed will approximate $165,000.00. 

The working out of the Emerson School proved to be a very interesting and 
delightful problem. On this work Mr. John Galen Howard was the associate 



54 



The Architect mid Engineer 




SECOND FLOOR PLAN, DURANT SCHOOL, OAKLAND 
ioufs't'^MuiLGARDT } ASSOCLiTE ARCHITECTS 



The Architect atid Eus^incer 




FIRST FLOOR PLAN. MAIN CORRIDOR AND 
BOYS' LAVATORY, DURANT SCHOOL. 0AKL.4\D 



56 



The Architect and Engineer 







S2S 



The Architect and Eiii^iiieer 



57 




LAZEAR SCHOOL. OAKLAND 
John J. Doiwzaii, Architect 




LOCKWOOD SCHOOL. SHOWIXG COURT. OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan and Lewis F. Hobart, Associate Architects 



58 



The Architect and Ens;inccr 




FREMOXT HIGH SCHOOL. OAKLAXD 
John J. Doiw.ait, Architect 




PATIO, JEFFERSON SCHOOL. OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 
John J. Donovan and W. J. Miller, Associate .Architects 



The .Irchitcct and Engineer 



59 




FRO.\T I'lEU', CLElhLAXU SCHOOL, OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan and Shafcr &■ Wilde, Associate Architects 




Kl-.AK I /til ()/• CL/;I l:LJ\l> i,L HOOL. OAKLA.XD 
Join, J. Donovan and Shafer S- ll'ildc. Associate Architects 



60 



The Architect and Enaincer 




CLAUSON SCHOOL, OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan, Architect 




COURT OF SANTA FE SCHOOL. OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan, Architect 



The Architect and Engineer 



61 




ALAMEDA COUMV INFIRMARY COMPETITIOX 

Awarded Second Prise of $1,000 

John J. Donovan, Architect 



architect, and his work and assistance was of the greatest value, and the 
simpHcity of the design and arrangement is sufficient evidence of the very happy 
co-operation. 

This is a one-story reinforced concrete school building with two interior 
patios, assembly hall, playroom and cafeteria kitchen, separating the patios. 

It will be observed from the floor plan that the orientation in this design is 
that of the east, south and west for the classrooms, and the north light for the 
manual training, domestic arts, science, club room, teachers' lunch room, etc. 
A very happy location has been assigned to the kindergarten, which is directly 
in the center of the south portion of the building and has an interesting pergola 
with a wrought iron railing designed in the letters of the alphabet. Tliis is one 
of the most pleasing of the one-story type of schools. 

The other schools which are illustrated have been developed from the re- 
quirements of the program, which established the sizes of the classrooms, the 
capacity of the assembly halls and the arrangement and location of the club 
rooms and libraries with regard to the use by the public. 

In this respect a very careful study has been given the planning of the 
buildings. No city has attempted more in the wider use of the public school 
than Oakland, for each building contains a club room with its kitchenette for 
civic club uses, a branch of the public library, showers and locker rooms for the 
playground, dressing and bathing accommodations, and the spirit whicii 
prompted the extensive use of the school has been maintained in the working 
cut of the various problems. 

A most worthy and notable fact in the construction of these buildings has 
been the integrity of the entire operation ; the hearty co-operation by the Board 
of Educaiton, the Commissioner of Public Works. Mr. Harry S. Ander.son, and 
the City Council. The hearty approval which these buildings have received 
from educators and visitors is well worth the effort made to do something for 
once in a good, broad, liberal manner. 



62 



Tlic Arcliitcct and Eui'i)icci 




WASHINGTON SCHOOL. OAKLAND, BEFORE HINCS WERE ADDED 




IVASHINGTON SCHOOL. AFTER WINGS WERE ADDED 
John J. DoiwVLUi and L. P. Hobart, Associate Arclutccts 



The Architect and EiiHitcer 



63 




LONGFELLOW SCHOOL. BEFORE IfLXCS WERE ADDED 




LOXCFELLOW SCHOOL BUILDI\G. OAKLAND 
John J. Donovan and C. (f. Dickey, Associate Architects 



64 



The Architect and Engineer 




The Architect and Emsiiicer 



65 



tirx; 






ItZOOiZ 



N 



I • :: :M 



r I.; 



E3 y-ii 



■'t 



t.J-l -J 0\K i'VRk ^CllOOt 



FIRST FLOOR PLAN, OAK PARK SCHOOL. SACRAMENTO 
John 1. Doiwrun, Archilecl 




SECOND FLOOR PLAN, OAK PARK SCHOOL. SACRAMENTO 
John J. Donoi-ait. Architect 



66 



The Architect and Engineer 




FROST ELEl'ATION, OAKLAXD ALDirORICM 
John J. Donovan. Architect, and Henry Hornhostcl. Consulting Architect 




PERSPECTIVE. NORTH ELEVATION. OAKLAND AUDITORICM 



The Arcliitcct and Engineer 



67 




GENERAL PLAN. OAKLAND AUDITORIUM. SHOIVING DEVELOPMENT OF CIUIC CEXTER 
John J. Doiw.ati. Anhilect, and Henry Hornbostel. Consulting Architect 




STEEL FRAME. OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 



68 



The Avchitcct and Eui^incer 





FBIBIQIEIIR 






DETAILS OF MCHES. OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 
John J. Dono-ran. Architect, ai.il Henry Hornhostel. Ccnsniling Architect 





^lJ"^u^'"w'^W""fc^ 



FIRST AND SECOND FLOOR PLANS. OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 



The Architect and Engineer 



69 




SHOIVIXG HEAVY STRUCTURAL STEEL 
CONSTRUCTION OF OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 



70 



The Architect and Engineer 




STEEL DETAILS. OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 
John J. Donovan, Architect, and Henry Hornbostcl, Consnlting Architect 




SECTION OF FRONT AND SIDE, OAKLAND AUDITORIUM 
From a photograph taken February loth 



The Architect and Engineer 71 

Who is to Blame? 

By J. F. SCHMIDT, in The Contractor and Builder 

WHEN competitive bids for the construction of buildings are opened we 
find many new men in line with -bids to present. The experienced men 
in construction business are falling off in number, many have 
given up in despair or have been forced to surrender unconditionally on 
account of the present system, under which profits to a contractor are 
practically impossible. Tlie men who get the bulk of the work now are 
in most every instance beginners, men who have never served an appren- 
ticeship in aiiy trade and in most cases are in a position to care little about 
loss because from this evil they are immune, having nothing to lose. 

This subject has appeared in the builders' journals at different times 
and was at one time discussed by the architects in meeting of their associa- 
tion, but up to this time no effective remedy has been suggested, and 
if suggested, it has not been put into practice. Shall the contractors wait 
until the architects, through mercy, work out the problem for them by 
reason of the trouble our architects find in getting the buildings up in good 
order and the bills paid, or will the contractors work out their own salva- 
tion by following the examples set by other industries and professions? 

The position of the contractors is at this writing such as requires united 
action. When a bid is made up, based upon some of the contingencies 
which may arise during the construction of a building and such a bid is 
in competition with one not based upon any contingencies, the former bid 
is, of course, from 10 per cent to 15 per cent the highest and is sure not to 
be accepted by the owner. The specifications are always so drawn that 
the contractor is entirely at the mercy of the owner except in cases where 
the architect is of such a character that he will insist upon justice, in 
preference to the owner's good will. 

One would imagine that an architect, when called upon to decide a 
question at issue between the contractor and owner, would see his own 
advantage first and lean to favor the owner because of his future work 
(there are plenty of contractors anyway). Some years ago. this leaning 
on the part of the architect was perceptible, but the reputable architect of 
today has taken a different attitude. This must be attributed to the asso- 
ciation and is therefore a splendid example for the contractor. A contractor 
of experience and substantiability can foresee many pitfalls in the business, 
knowing that a mishap or mistake, no matter who is morally or legally 
responsible, will interrupt the work and lead him into complications and 
money loss. It does not matter who made a mistake, the contractor is sup- 
posed to rectify it, if it is necessary to do so in order to be able to deliver a 
completed building and keep in good standing. 

A contractor of no experience and of no responsibility does not foresee 
danger, neither can he lose what he does not possess. He is the more 
liable to bid low and as the work invariably goes to the lowest bidder, thfe 
most work is done by this class, which adds trouble for the architect, encour- 
ages litigation, creates bankruptcies, and loss to the owner — loss to the owner 
because repairs are often necessary soon after completion of the work. 

You say that the contractor should give a surety bond. Can you recall 
many cases where the suretv company is liable? If they were, they would 
not write bonds so freely. You say that the contractor should carry liability 
insurance. Do all contractors know that an insurance company is not 
liable where the contractor has not complied with the statute? How many 
contractors have time to read the statute? Here again the class of con- 



72 The Architect and Em^inccr 

tractors, who are such a detriment to sound liusiness, have no reason to 
care what the statute is. L'nder the laws of Illinois. Wisconsin, Ohio, and 
several other states, it is necessary for the contractor to build a scaffold 
for work which was formerly done in the air. And it is necessary that a 
scaiifold has a slatted or solid sailing'and still if an accident occurs, the 
contractor is liable. Can such a contractor bid in competition with one 
who by reason of his lacking financial ability is not liable in any event? 

Cost of bidding is an expense, which in the writer's office, amounts to 
one-tenth of one per cent of the cost of the buildings figured annually, and 
this does not include railroad fare. At this rate, with an average of ten bid- 
ders to a job, the waste on all of the work for which contracts are let is one 
per cent and is greater when adding the cost where contracts are not let. It 
is possible for an owner to get a long list of bids and sub bids, whether the 
work is let or not. 

A remedy for the present evils can be effected by an association and 
that will be done sooner or later even if the architects must bring it about. 
These men have, through their association, bettered their conditions very 
materially. If the contractors wish in their own field to save their business, 
they will find it necessary to have some protection which is more effective 
than anything they have had. They will find it necessary to work together 
with the architects and support the high standard advocated by them. 

Had the brickmakers in Chicago been without an association this year, 
they would have lost their business. 

One suggestion for a remedy may be made which if worked out by con- 
tractors, may again build up a standard. When the owner invites bids, he 
should agree to pay for them. This would lead to care on his part as to 
the class invited and would cost him no more in the end. Under the 
present system the estimating is not and can not be done free of charge. 
The cost is added to the bid, but there is no inducement for the best men- 
in the business to respond to an invitation. If a fee of one-fourth of one 
per cent were paid to the person making the lowest bid and a smaller frac- 
tion to each of the others, this would have a tendency to limit the bidders 
who make all the trouble and cause so much waste. It would create a 
better and happier condition for the owner, architect and builders. 

It might enchance the health of men operating the legal machinery, 
who could be sent on a vacation, would result in better structures and be 
the means of a considerable saving in cost. If the contractors do not them- 
selves benefit by the lesson set by other organizations and do not make 
an effort to work out their own salvation, then they can only charge the 
blame for the present adverse conditions to themselves. 



Jimmy 

An efficiency engineer of Cleveland said on the Hamburg-American pier 
in Holjoken : 

"I am just back from England. In the offices over there they under- 
stand modern methods — they understand efficiency — about as little as 
Jimmy, the new office boy, did. 

" 'Jimmy,' said the boss, 'file these letters.' 

"An hour later Jimmy said to the boss : 

"'You told me to file these letters, sir; but wouldn't it do just as well 
if I trimmed them off with a pair of shears?' " 



Tin- Arcliitcct and Engineer 



73 




FIREPROOF SAMTARV VMT. CHILDREN'S HOSl'ITAL, XEli' YORK CITY 



Safety First in Hospital Buildings 

By A. W. ECKBERG.* 

In times fyast a fire in a building zcas considered an nna-eoidable reil. but today d -.s 
regarded as a crime Zi>hen caused by conditions ichich arc preventable. The term "nre- 
proof" is a mockery z^-tien applied to buildings Are-rcsisti-ee in their construction only, and 
fitted Zi'ith wooden doors and trim. . 

The ideal hospital has no inflammable material in its construction or equipment, trom, 
foundation to roof fire-resistive material is used and its doors, jc-iiidotra and trim are of 
'steel. The occupants can now rest and recuperate in structures that are safe without tlie 
disturbing thoughts of a possible holocaust. — Editor. 

STATISTICS prove that far more fires occur in hospitals and other 
institutions for those physically, mentally and morally helpless or 
defective, than in any other buildings. And it's the inmate of these 
very buildings who is least able, in fact, many times absolutely unable, 
to move to safety when fire threatens— he is at the mercy of the devour- 
ing, fast-increasing flames. 

To succor the needy is certainly commendable— but how absurd to 
exercise rigid care in treating patients, while simultaneously housing them 
in either dearly non-fireproof or at best so-calletl fireproof buildings whose 
wooden doors 'and windows permit a fire to go from room to room, from 
floor to floor! Stone, brick or cement walls don't make a fireproof build- 
ing, as has been demonstrated in a practical and convincing manner by 
the' unfortunate fires of such so-called "fireproof" buildings as the 

* With Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company, Jamestown, N. Y. 



1 he .Ircliitcct and Engineer 




SEC7I0X THROUGH METAL BUCK FRAME 




METAL DOORS AND TRIM IS >.l>.i Li-y 
HOSPITAL. BUFFALO, N. Y. 



The Architect and Eni^ineer 




A SANITARY METAL DOOR 



Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce building, the No. 80 Broadway building. 
New York City, and more recently by the ruin of the Thomas A. Edison 
plant at Orange, N. J. 

It is in hospitals, asylnms and similar institutions that, if anywhere, 
safety should be particularly emphasized and sought in the construction 
and management of the building. The rapidity with which fires spread, 
unretardedly, once they gain any headway in such buildings, gives suffi- 
cient evidence of the prevailing errors of plans and equipment. Statistics 
show innumerable instances of fires that could have been confined to the 
locality of origin had floors been subdivided with incombustible partitions 
and doors and elevator and stair openings likewise protected. 

By reason of insufficient appropriations many up-to-the-minute archi- 
tects, while incorporating features of design, construction and equipment 
when planning new asylums, hospitals, etc., that are calculated to resist 
and control fire, realize that these provisions fall far short of what should 
be done to provide "safety first" for the occupants. 



76 The Architect and Engineer 

Owners in financing their buildings should provide their architect with 
means to make them safe. Existing institutional buildings should be 
altered to retard the spread of fire by the installation of incombustible 
partitions, metal doors, trim, etc., and be equipped to control fire. 

Progressive communities are concerned about the safety of life in 
theaters and require necessary equipment with which to control fires and 
rigid precautions to be taken to avoid them. Of course, the lives of amuse- 
ment seekers are ordinarily of more value to society than those of inmates 
of asylums, or of homes for the aged, or of alms houses, but society must 
care for unfortunates and incompetents and must give them safe shelter. 
And as statistics show that an institutional building has burned wholly 
or in part every five and a half days since January 1, 1908, it is clear that 
shelters as heretofore constructed are not safe. 

The importance of protecting the structural parts of a building against 
the ravages of fire is generally conceded, but the necessity for interior 
fireproofing, which quarantines a fire in the room in which it starts and 
which thereby provides "safety first" and safeguards the lives of the help- 
less patients and the contents of the buildings has not been so well recog- 
nized until recently. 

By the use of hollow metal doors, frames and trim, eliminating all 
wood, your building — if safe in other respects — will be fireproof in fact 
and not in name only. A fire cannot spread in such a building and the 
lives of the occupants will not be endangered from this source. Then, too, 
the insurance rate is lower for such a building. 

In designing and detailing the doors and trim for hospitals, sanitariums, 
or institutional buildings, experts in sanitation and architects require all 
corners and crevices that would serve as lodging places for dust and disease- 
breeding germs to be eliminated. By making all mouldings and quirks 
rounded and smooth, the work is easily cleaned and kept in a sanitary condition. 



Surface Imperfections 



Imperfections in the exposed surfaces of concrete are usually due to 
one or more of ten well known causes, as follows : 

( 1 ) Variations in the nature of the cement, sand or stone. 

( 2 ) Lack of uniformity in the amounts of ingredients in each batch. 

( 3 ) Insufficient mixing in any or all batches of concrete. 

( 4 ) Lack of care in placing the concrete next to the moulds. 

( 5 ) Lack of proper protection in placing concrete. 

( 6 ) Efflorescence and discoloration of the surface. 

( 7 ) Unsightly construction joints. 

( 8 ) Imperfectly made forms. 

( 9 ) Dirt on the forms. 

(10) Adhesion of forms. 

The ends of reinforcing bars which are left protruding for splicing 
should be, if they are not likely to be connected up for some time, painted 
with some paint to diminish rusting and to guard against being bent or 
loosened. 



The Architect and Engineer 77 

Official Minutes, February Meetings of San 
Francisco Chapter, A. I. A. 

By SVLVAIN SCHNAITTACHER. Secretary 

A SPECIAL meeting of the San Francisco Chapter of the American Insti- 
tute of Architects was held on Friday evening. February 12th, at the 
Techau Tavern, in honor of Monsieur Henri Guillaume, representative 
of France in the erection of the French PaviHon at the World's Fair grounds. 

Among the guests present were : 

Monsieur Henri Guillaume, Maurice Couchot. Bernard R. Maybeck, Mr. Sperry, 
Paul Denevielle, Mr. Alden. Mr. Turnbull. Loring P. Ri.xford. J. C. Morrell. Mr. 
Takeda, Mr. Ito, Henry Hornbo.'^tel. 

Chapter members present : 

Walter D. Bliss, Wm. B. Faville. .\rthur Brown. Jr., Harris Allen, Charles Dickey, 
William Knowles, John Bakewell. Jr., J. S. Fairweather, G. B. McDougall, Wm. H. 
Crim, Jr., Albert Farr, Walter H. Ratcliff, Jr., John J. Donovan, Oswald Speir, 
Charles S. Kaiser, John A. Baur, E. J. Molera. Sylvain Schnaittacher, B. J. S. Cahill, 
Edgar .■\. Mathews, William Mooser, William C. Hays, O. G. Traphagen, Bernard 
J. Joseph, Matthew O'Brien. .Albert Schroepter, Willis Polk, George Kelham, John 
Galen Howard, Edward J. Vogel. 

Mr. W. B. Faville, president of the Chapter, presided over the banquet. 

j\Ir. McDougall. the past president of the San Francisco Chapter was called 
upon for a toast to the gtiests of the evening. 

Mr. Polk was called upon to welcome the guests. Mr. Polk spoke fluently 
of the great Stars in .Architecture the world over and of the stride made in 
.\merica, and assured Monsieur Guillaume that .\merica realized and appre- 
ciated the debt she owed to France for her architectural guidance. 

Mr. Allen of Berkeley and Mr. Sperry of San Francisco then sang a duet. 

Mr. Hornbostel, as president of the Beaux Arts School in New York, spoke 
of the inner workings of that school and the wonders it has accomplished in 
New York, and how this school is now turning out American modelers. Mr. 
Hornbostel congratulated Mr. Maybeck upon his work on the Fine Arts Build- 
ing and said from this day on he would take his hat off to Mr. Maybeck. 

Mr. Faville said in part: 

"This gathering and the theme of the evening is to express an appreciation 
of the debt we owe to France for her architectural light : to the Ecole de Beaux 
Arts for its guidance and to its professors who have so faithfully labored in 
our Universities. I will ask Professor Maybeck to speak of the Ecole de Beaux 
.Arts, its traditions and the spirit of this school in which Professor Maybeck 
studied, worked and played." 

Mr. Maybeck was then called upon for an address. He thanked ]\Ir. Horn- 
bostel for his kind remarks in reference to the Art building and took his audi- 
ence back into history some 200 years. He pointed out in a clear and scholarly 
manner what American architects had learned from France and the great im- 
pulse she had given, not only to .\merica, but to the whole civilized world. 

Mr. Faville then spoke of the professors of France in our universities, and 
in introducing Arthur Brown, Jr.. said in part: 

"Mr. Arthur Brown will tell us of the works of the French professors in 
our universities and their accomplishments, for he has spent many years in the 
ateliers of France and is conversant with the spirit both abroad and at home. 

"Enviable honor has been offered Mr. Brown by the Harvard University. 
They have asked hini to accept in that university the chair of Architecture. We 
know from the high standard of this university that the honor is not lightly 
bestowed." 



78 The Architect and Eiii^incer 

Mr. Brown said: "It seems very proper on this occasion to pay tribute to 
the French architects who have taught in our technical schools, as Air. Guil- 
laume's very distinguished father, Mr. Edmond Guillaume, was for many years 
Professor of the Theory of Architecture in the Paris school and in that capacity 
was the representative of the trend of architectural education in France. 

"Clearness of thought and expression is one of the striking characteristics 
of the French mind, and to this quality is due, I think, much of their success 
as teachers of the arts and sciences. This talent for teaching has long been 
recognized in our country, and many of our leading schools have, during the 
past few years, sent to France for some of their teaching staff." 

Mr. Faville, introducing Mr. John Galen Howard, said : 

"Mr. Howard has kindly consented to speak upon La Belle France." 

Mr. Howard expressed himself as being very thankful for the privilege and 
honor of being able to address the San Francisco Chapter before such a dis- 
tinguished guest as Monsieur Guillaume and of other representatives of the 
different nations. With it also came a certain obligation and that was the over- 
whelming importance of the subject upon which he had been asked to speak. 
He said : "I cannot even begin to touch upon the most important phase in the 
claims that France has upon our civilization and the gratitude we owe to 
that nation." 

Mr. Faville, in calling upon Monsieur Henri Guillaume, the guest of the 
evening, said in part: 

"Monsieur Henri Guillaume, it is with extreme honor that we address to you 
the remarks of Messrs. Howard, Maybeck and Brown. They are tokens of 
the love and respect in which we hold your country. 

"We trust that you will accept the assemblage of our fellow architects to- 
night as an expression of the appreciation with which we hold the teachings of 
your patrons and ateliers, an appreciation of the importance to us which your 
teachings have been in the development of our architecture, and we beg to con- 
vey to you the distinction which your presence at the Exposition affords us and 
our pleasure at your being able to be with us tonight, which is to express our 
appreciation to France for her architectural light; to the Ecole de Beaux .\ris 
for her guidance and to her professors who have so faithfully labored in our 
universities." 

Monsieur Guillaume replied in the French language, expressing his thanks 
to the San Francisco Chapter and the architects of San Francisco for the honor 
bestowed upon him, his nation and the Architecture of his native land, while 
over fifty of the leading architects of San Francisco and bay cities bowed their 
heads to France for their guidance in architectural development. 

President Faville continued : "As guests this evening we are pleased to have 
with us Mr. Takeda and Mr. Ito from the Kingdom of Japan, representatives 
sent to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition to erect their pavilion and 
to create the garden so expressive of the land of the Cherry Blossom. 

The president then called upon Mr. Takeda of Japan and Mr. B. Ito, repre- 
senting Air. Takeda, in an able way addressed the meeting and expressed his 
appreciation in being honored by the architects of San Francisco. 
Mr. Faville then called upon Mr. J. C. Morrel of Australia. 

Mr. Morrel told of how Australia was reaching forth for knowledge in 
architecture and how the Australian Government was sending men to this 
■ nation, as well as others, for information of vital interest along the lines of 
architecture. 

The banquet then adjourned. 



The Architect and Em^inccr 79 

OFFICIAL MINUTES OF MEETING OF FEBRUARY 26 1915 
An adjourned monthly meeting of the San Francisco Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects was held at the Tait-Zinkand Cafe, 168 O'Farrell 
street, on Friday, February 26th. The meeting was called to order at 1 :30 by 
,Mr. Faville, the president. 

Mr. Ellinwood of New York, and Mr. Martin, of the Southern California 
Chapter, were present as guests of the Chapter. 

Minutes 

The minutes of the meeting of January 21st and the special meeting of 
February 12, 1915, were read and approved. 

Legislative Committee 

Mr. Mcoser was called upon by Mr. Faville to give a resume of what had 
been done regarding the law of 1872 since the last meeting. He stated that 
repeal bills had been introduced in the Senate and referred to the Educational 
Committee and also in the Assembly and referred to the Judiciary Committee. 

Some discussion followed and it was duly moved, seconded and carried, that 
the report of the committee be accepted and the matter left as before, in the 
hands of the Board of Directors for any necessary action. 

Mr. Schnaittacher reported that a bill had been introduced, amending the 
"Act to Regulate the Practice of Architecture," and that it was desirable that 
the architects be informed as to the measure. This matter was also placed in 
the hands of the Board of Directors by the action of the Chapter. 

Communications 

From Charles Butler, secretary New York Chapter, A. I. A., extending invi- 
tation to the San Francisco Giapter; communication from Henry A. Schulze, 
notifying the Chapter of receipt of letter from the Institute advising him that 
his resignation had been accepted as of efifect of December 4, 1914; from Com- 
mission of Immigration and Housing, inviting the Chapter to attend the Hous- 
ing Exhibit of the Commission, from Burt L. Fenner, secretary A. I. A., relative 
to convention at Los Angeles, and one relating to the Board of Directors' reso- 
lution to the law of 1872 ; from Panama-Pacific Insurance Club, regarding 
celebration of "Nine Years After Event"; from American Federation of Arts 
appealing for preservation of monuments of art from the present war in Europe 
and one regarding the convention to be held in Washington May 12-14, 1915 ; 
from National Conference on City Planning, Boston, enclosing Bulletin of 
same; from H. C. Jones, representing the 28th District of the California Legis- 
lature, relating to the law of 1872 ; from California Employers' Federation 
relating to measure to be introduced at this session of the Legislature relating 
to the erection of tenement houses ; from the Mayor's office, requesting a repre- 
sentative to attend conference on tenement house conditions. 
New Business 

In regard to the communication from the ]\Iayor's office, requesting that the 
Chapter be represented at the conference arranged by the Commission of Immi- 
gration and Housing, it was stated that Messrs. Bakewell, Mathews and 
Mooser had attended the meeting ; that much proposed tenement house legis- 
lation had been discussed and it was suggested that inasmuch as another 
meeting was to be held on March 3d, that as many members as possible, of this 
Chapter, attend, and therefore the secretary was directed to notify all members 
by postal to attend the meeting. 

A letter from Mr. Henry A. Schulze, a past president of the Chapter, having 
been read and stating that he had retired from the active practice of his pro- 
fession, it was duly moved, seconded and unanimously carried that Mr. Schulze 
he made an Honorary Member of the Chapter. 



80 The Architect and Engineer 

It was duly moved, seconded and carried that this Chapter endorse the 
proposition of acquiring the Sutro land. 

The matter of the Chapter's membership in the Pacific Coast Architectural 
League was brought up by Mr. Bakewell and discussed at some length. It was 
then duly moved, seconded and carried that the Chapter be represented at the 
rext meeting of the League and that some plan of reorganization be proposed 
for discussion at that time. 

Mr. Rudolph A. Herold of Sacramento was invited by Mr. Faville to talk to 
the Chapter. He expressed his pleasure at being present and stated what had 
been done in Sacramento in the formation of the Civic Architectural League, 
and extended an invitation to the Chapter to arrange for a meeting at Sacra- 
mento at an early date. 

* 

Basis of Current Practice in Design of Reinforced 
Concrete Structures 

CA. P. TL^RNER, consulting engineer, Minneapolis, Minn., and well 
known on the Pacific Coast, read a paper entitled "Basis of Current 
Practice in Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures" at the Amer- 
ican Concrete Institute in Chicago in February. Mr. Turner said in part : 

The universally accepted basis of reinforced concrete design may be summarized 
in the following stock quotation from building codes (see the Chicago, San Francisco, 
Columbus. codes, or those of other cities): 

"The adhesion is such as to cause concrete and steel to act together" — or 

"The bond between the concrete and the steel is such that the two materials shall 
act as homogeneous solid." 

Adhesion or bond is thus generally accepted as the connecting link between the 
concrete and the metal and we should naturally expect to see its operation discussed 
in all the literature of the art found in text books and the like. 

The problem of the continuous flat slab of reinforced concrete is one which the 
writer has studied continuously for something like seventeen years, and it is needless 
to say this study from the scientific viewpoint has not been unaccompanied by many 
investigations and tests of finished structures. Incidentally the writer has many times 
designed reinforced concrete floors with two-way continuous beams from support to 
support and made many tests of such structures, and has also built and tested simple 
beam structures where the work covered single spans as well. 

In any structure in which there is combined stress or stress of the same kind 
acting in two directions it is a well known fact that these stresses tend to reduce 
each other or increase the resistance to deformation by mutual action. 

Grashof undertook to account for this relation in the operation of a homogeneous 
plate by the general equations of internal stress and the introduction of Poisson's 
ratio. In the reinforced concrete plate we have only an imitation of the homogeneous 
plate. The Poisson effect, or the increased resistance by the co-action of stresses in 
different directions, would not be a property of either the concrete or the metal but a 
function of their co-action arising from indirect tensions and compressions due to 
bond shear. 

Dr. Eddy has accounted for the deportment of such reinforced concrete plates in 
a very satisfactory manner by taking a co-efficient representing the lateral action 
as .5. This step in Dr. Eddy's mathematical solution has been treated by some 
members of the engineering profession as involving the mj'stery of Poisson's ratio, 
in which they have no faith at all. Let us see how far the doctor's mathematics is 
affected by Poisson's ratio. 

The working stress is also reduced in the same ratio. This does not account for 
a difference of approximately 300 per cent found in the deflection formula for the 
continuous beam and the continuous slab and we must turn back to the bond shear 
relations which I have pointed out in order to understand the matter clearly. 

It has been noted that these empirical co-efficients are such that the stiffness of 
the continuous beam when combined integrally with a slab is six times as stifT as a 
simple beam, its stiffness having been increased by the slab with which it is combined from 
being five times as stiff as a simple beam, as it is in general case of a continuous beam to 
six times as stiff, as it is in this case. 

This relation can be best understood by consideration of the theory of work dis- 
cussed very fully in the recent treatise by Dr. Eddy and the present writer, which 



The Architect and Eiit^inecr 81 

has been already referred to, in which is shown that where circumferential resistance 
act in circles about the tops of the columns energy is stored in such a manner that 
it does not afifect the vertical geometry of the slab. When, however, the panel is 
rectangular these resistances act in ellipses about the column tops and the energy 
is no longer stored in a manner which does not affect the vertical geometry of the 
floor, but it does affect to a considerable and increasing extent as the panel becomes 
more and more oblate. 

Comparing the continuous plate with the simple beam, the continuous plate with 
the same cross section of steel at mid span in the square panel, assuming that 
Poisson's ratio equals zero, is by the theory of work approximately six times as 
strong and twenty times as stiff as the simple beam with the same cross section of 
steel and thickness of slab and a span equal to the diagonal of the panel. 

The absurd character of the regulations in vogue in many cities will become ap- 
parent from these relations, which have been presented in a simple inanner from 
the standpoint of experimental evidence from hundreds of tests and from the stand- 
point of theory of work, assuming Poisson's ratio equals zero, as well as from the 
consequences derived from the general equations of equilibrium of an infinitesimal 
element in which the lateral effects are given proper consideration in the mathematical 
determination of deflections and stresses from one and the same formula. 

The law governing the mode of operation of the connecting link between the 
concrete and metal determines the limiting steel ratios. We have SO per cent of the 
building codes in the United States requiring SO per cent more steel thin is necessary 
to develop the concrete used in the continuous slab on column supp6rts. Here, then, 
is an opportunity for economy without reduction in the safety of the structure. 

The Chicago code while requiring computed steel stresses lOO per cent at mid 
span greater than determined by test, allows in a light rectangular slab a thickness 
so small -that the true concrete stresses may under test be at least SO per cent higher 
than would be computed. This relation is brought about by an irrational comparison 
of the rectangular slab with a square slab having a side equal to the average of the 
long and short sides of the panel. The gross error involved is evident from the 
deflection formula given and the well known relation of steel stress to deflection in 
any fixed arrangement of steel. 

In the design of simple slabs or wide beams there is hardly a code that I have 
examined which would not, under the rules followed, literally permit double the 
amount of steel to be used which an experienced engineer would employ to develop 
the concrete element. Here is an opportunity for the regulations . of our cities to 
be greatly improved, because these rules are supposed to govern the conduct of those 
who are lacking in experience as well as those who have had the benefit of this experi- 
ence, and the structures figured under the letter of the law may prove unsatisfactory. 

In the provision for shear little attention has been paid to the difference in the 
horizontal shearing deformations of the continuous and the simple beam. This has 
been discussed quite fully by Eddy and Turner in their treatise, and it has been 
shown that the continuous beam is capable of resisting double the shear that the 
simple beam can carry. 

Having discussed briefly beam action and slab action, it is next in order to con- 
sider the question of columns. The variation in the regulations of different cities 
amounts to more than 100 per cent in the amount of material required in the construc- 
tion of columns for the same load. Such a variation cannot evidently be based on 
any rational hypothesis. 

The American Society joint committee has rules governing column design which 
render such columns as were designed in the Edison factory more economical to 
build than tough, strong, reliable hooped columns such are are usually built in the 
western cities, and particularly in the northwestern sections of the United States 
and Canada where the enhanced safety in cold weather work coincident to this form 
is recognized and appreciated. The rules devised by the joint committee seem to be 
based on tests so conducted as to preclude or prevent the coactioti of the concrete 
and metal. That is, test data have been secured from test specimens in which the 
longitudinal steel and concrete were made to bear equally on the face plate of the 
machine. The results from such tests can evidently have no relation whatever to the 
strength developed in a column of a building properly designed. 

The committee on concrete and reinforced concrete of the Canadian Society of 
Civil Engineers has exihibited a higher order of mechanical intelligence in their rules 
relative to the design of columns than have the committee of the American society, 
since they permit reasonable working values which encourage the design of columns 
well hooped and vertically reinforced. 

The great divergence found in test results of columns was the subject of careful 
consideration by the writer for several years and formulas which would fit test results 
were found only by taking into consideration the end condition of the vertical steel. 
This has been discussed quite fully in the recent treatise by Eddy and Turner. 



82 The Architect and Eii<^incer 

Why Apartment House Loans are Good Investments 

THE question has been repeatedly asked, "What does the high class 
apartment house offer as an inducement to the mortgage investor?" 
In order to reach a satisfactory solution of the question it would be 
well to indulge in a restrospect, then consider the present status, with a 
view of forecasting the future, writes John Finck in the New York Herald. 

Apartment houses came into existence as a substatute for private houses 
in order to meet an enforced economy and for the further general conveni- 
ence of the housewife, who found greater ease there in the compactness of 
her surroundings. These general conditions proving satisfactory, the "fad," 
as it was first considered, took deep root and spread with such rapidity that 
it soon became a fixed institution, with all the traditions or originality 
obscured in a dim past. 

This class of building will alwaj's retain its strength and readih' im- 
presses the cautious mortgage investor. We must not confound this class 
of building with apartment hotels, which, being used for a specific purpose, 
do not meet with the same generous approval of the mortgage investor 
as do apartment houses. The lessening of building construction within 
recent years has tended to bring about an increased tenancy, which in large 
measure offsets the natural depreciation in values. 

The general situation presents an element of hope, and there is no substantial 
cause for pessimism. 

A high class structure should be at least sixty-five feet in width, to-wit, 
the frontage of three ordinary private houses. Such houses have in large 
measure superseded the dwelling'. Built in first-class neighborhoods, there 
is but slight danger of loss of value, while also there is very little impair- 
ment to a solidly constructed building. 

This class of security has appealed to the permanent investor, as a result 
of which a large part of our high class apartment houses have attracted 
the wealthy of other cities, who have used this means of investment as a 
profitable outlet for their surplus funds. 

This class of property has been recognized as stable, and, being in 
strong hands, offers the best possible security to the mortgage investor. 
Tenanted by a steady class, the loss of rent is minimized. The higher 
class of apartment houses have divorced from palatial residences many 
of our most prominent citizens. 

Large lenders, including banks and trust companies, have been attracted 
by this class of security, and as a result heretofore there has been no 
difficulty experienced in obtaining favorable mortgage loans at reasonable 
rates of interest. Foreclosures have been uncommon, and at the worst 
losses have been slight. Strengthened by the knowledge that there is a 
bulwark of financial strength behind them, as most of the owners have 
bought for investment, not speculation, there is a further sense of security 
in the mind of the investor in such mortgages. The same induceiuents 
which heretofore have swayed the investors are still in force. 

The future of the apartment house is no longer problematical. It has 
been grafted onto our domiciliary system, and is sure and lasting. 

During the last few years, while the general class of property has not 
stood the acid test of adversity, yet apartment houses as a class by them- 
selves weathered the general depreciation without any noteworthy loss to 
owner or mortg'agee. 

It is this statistical fact which holds for the owner of apartment houses 
the favor of mortgage investors. 



The Architect and Emiincc)- 



83 




THE NEW DAVENPORT HOTEL. SPOKANE 
Cutter & Malmgren, Architects 

The Davenport Hotel, Spokane, Washington 

THE accompanying- plates show the class of hotel construction that is 
being carried out by architects in the Pacific Northwest. The pictures 
show the completed Davenport Hotel at Spokane, designed by Messrs. 
Cutter & Malmgren, architects, of that city. The style of architecture is Floren- 
tine, with an exterior finish of red pressed brick, brown colored terra cotta and 
Boise sandstone. 

A notable feature of the great hotel, which cost close to $1,000,000, is 
the dining room designed in the Spanish renaissance. Graceful columns on 
either side of the room support an elliptical ceiling of an arcade. The color 
treatment is in old ivory. Soft colors have been introduced into the running 
design of birds hares, turtles, fox, etc., on the ceiling beams. Grotesque 
figrires are used in the bolsters surmounting the Corinthian columns. 

The Chinese bufl'et is executed in colors of blue, red and gold. The 
Cyprus wainscoting is finished to a suki wood with details of characteristic 



84 



The Architect and Em^inccr 




The Architect and Enzineer 



85 







86 



Tin- Architect and Eiii;iiiccr 




Tlic Architect and Eii<'iiiccr 



87 



CHINESE BUFFET, 

DAVENPORT HOTEL 

SPOKANE. 

WASHINGTON 




conventional oriental desig-n. The floor is of red Grueliy tile. The whole 
scheme artistically expresses a true Chinese atmosphere. 

On the mezzanine floor are located the Marie Antoinette ballroom, 
the Elizabethian banquet room, the state suite, hair dressing parlors, gentle- 
men's smoking room and retiring rooms. The ballroom is finished with 
panels of French grey, mouldings of panels, etc., in light ivory with much 
of the ornamentation picked out in delicate blue and rose. ISalcony and 
French window hangings are all of rose color. Interspersed along the 
frieze of the balcony are medallions carrying jester heads, which contribute 
much to the feeling desired. The Elizabethian banquet room is finished 
with wall panels of oak. Surmounting the wainscoting there is a frieze 
showing heraldic emblems. A special feature of this is the clever system 
of disappearing doors which make it convenient to divide the floor space 
in three private dining or committee rooms. 

The entire study, whether involving exterior or interior details, 
whether applied to the choice and arrangement of colors, whether given 
to the laying out of the floors for maximum convenience and efficiency 
of service, is a product of which the architectural firm of Cutter & Alalm- 
gren, Spokane, may well be proud. The construction, though new, is 
truly old in mental concei)tion and execution. 




ELIZABETHAN 

BANQUET ROOM 

DAVENPORT HOTEL 



^8 The Architect and Engineer 

How the Amateur Describes a Skyscraper 

WHAT the magazine writer unfamiliar as he often is with the technical 
features of his subject, has to say in his descriptive picture of a happen- 
ing is frequently very amusing to those acquainted with the facts in 
the case. An instance of this kind is illustrated in a decidedly striking manner 
by a correspondent of the Scientific American, who thus quotes from and 
comments upon an article descriptive of a skyscraper in a monthly periodical : 

"The old brick building had vanished ... in a cloud of broken brick" 
(cloud of brick) "and plaster. Already the muddy floor was dotted with the 
toadstool tents of the excavators. . . . Far down in the stifling air of the 
caisson" (stifled oxygen) "the concrete roots were being planted, tied with 
cement and steel to the very core of the world. 

"The foundations were finished and the first thin columns" (weighing 
possibly one ton per foot) "stretched upward. In ordered plan, the crossbeams 
fell into their places, and the great lattice of the substructure" (that is to say, 
superstructure) "shaped itself. 

"On the topmost story the derricks crouched like giant spiders, thin legs 
braced against post" (or was it column?) "and I-beam. Untiring, hour after 
hour, the derricks lifted bales of steel, and as each story was bolted down" (by 
the pneumatic riveters) "the derricks lifted themselves heavily to the new 
level. ... 

"Like beetles the steel workers clambered surefooted over the empty frame. 
Like flies they caught the slim-spun threads of the derricks and sung up to some 
inaccessible" (although they did get there) "height. 

"Day faded in fog and darkness. Like beacon fires the forges of the workers 
glowed intermittently" (showing conclusively that scab labor was being 
employed ) . 

"I am thinking also of the other workers ; of men who measured this tall 
tower on their slide rules" (and worked out the formula for long columns on 
their tape measures). "Engineers who foresaw each bolt and fitted so per- 
fectly mass on mass" (without any previous experience and) "with only 
imagination and their books of figures to guide them ; . . . workers in the 
steel mills of the distant city who moulded" (or perhaps rolled) "each beam 
and pillar to go together like a watch — theirs in the silent, forgotten labor." 

Let us hope (adds the correspondent) that these nocturnes by untechnical 
men will be as soon forgotten ! 

* 
* * 

Talked on City Planning 

Charles Edward Cheney, editor of the City Planning and Book Review 
Departments of the Architect and Engineer of (California, addressed the March 
meeting of the Los Angeles Chapter, American Institute of Architects on "City 
and House Planning," illustrating his talk with numerous stereopticon slides. 



His Application 

An alien wished to be naturalized and applied to the clerk in the office, 
who requested him to fill out a blank which he handed him. Here are the 
questions and answers: 

"Name - Jacob Levinski." 

"Born - Yes." 

"Business - Rotten." 



The Architect and Engineer 89 

Professional and Other Incompetence 

By W. B. FAVILLE, President San Francisco Cliapter, A. I. A. 

Editor The Architect and Engineer:— 

In the January issue of your publication there ivas a most unfortunate article in regard 
to architects and their business ability. The article describes a point of z'iew which the 
public is only too prone to accept without questioning its truthfulness. 

On behalf of the San Francisco Chapter of the American Institute of Architects I ant 
sending you an article which appeared in the February issue of The Journal of the Institute 
decrying such foolish tirades as this against our profession. 

The struggle of the Institute and our local chapter is to arrive at an understanding of 
professional ethics among ourselz'es, to realize the debt we owe to the community, and to 
inform the general public in reference to our duties professionally. These are important 
aims and tt'c feel your publication should always lend its influence tozvards constructive 
instead of destructive criticism. 



(Journal of tlie American Institute of Architects.) 

LIVES there a man who has not visited his indignation, in a moment 
of wrath, upon some profession or other? We fancy not. The temp- 
tation at certain moments is far too great, and the outburst too 
completely satisfying. One seems to feel, after having delivered that 
particular curse, that one has made a great social and economic discovery. 
At last all the cobwebs have been swept away, and the whole miserable 
fraternity are exposed to the light of a righteous indignation and a per- 
ception which has at last pierced the sham. One flatters oneself upon an 
epoch-making discovery, the effects of which may not even be forecast. 
But somehow or other, the professions still increase and multiply. The 
world listens but does not hear. 

Most of us are at times given to sarcastic allusions to some one or 
other of the callings which frequently appear to prey upon us, and try our 
sense of justice beyond the breaking point, and the men who fly to the 
public press as a means of more completely airing their grievances against 
the professions are not by any means small in numbers. 

In the Real Estate Magazine for November [reprinted in the Architect 
and Engineer for January, with comments by F. W. FitzpatrickJ, one may 
read a particularly venomous attack upon the architectural profession. 
We opine that the excess of venom will cause it widely to overshoot the 
mark, for nothing rouses the sense of justice so much as a vulgar tirade. 
In this particular article, the owner of a hotel in the city of Minneapolis 
condemns the whole profession of architecture in language which is at 
once the most conspicuous compound of ignorance and bad taste which 
we have come across in some time. We do not attempt to pass upon the 
merits of the particular question, nor to resent anything except this sweep- 
ing denunciation of architects. 

Incompetence is indefensible. Professional incompetence exists wher- 
ever any profession is practiced. Incompetence runs riot through every 
walk of life, in every trade and calling; many of us have suffered from 
the peculiarly trying incompetence of that class of men to which the 
writer of the article in question belongs. But we may still agree that hotels 
are necessary, and not to be abolished because of the shortcomings of 
one man. 

A little thought will convince even the most bitter of men, provided 
he has a modicum of reason in a lucid moment, that professional incompe- 
tence thrives upon public incompetence. Behind the incompetent in any 
profession vyill be found the incompetent man who is paying the bills. 
He is, perhaps, too ignorant to know better. He picks his doctor, lawyer. 



90 The Architect and En^i^iiiccr 

architect, engineer with a great and rather pitiable faith that the title 
implies qualification. ( )n the other hand, there is the incompetent indi- 
vidual who encourages incompetence by deliberately buying it. Unwilling 
to concede that the worker is worthy of his hire, he bargains on the basis 
of fee or price. In employing an architect he not only refuses a remunera- 
tion which will permit the architect to give his full service, but he also 
frequently imposes upon a half dozen men to the extent of obtaining free 
sketches and rough plans. Playing one against the other, and relying upon 
their various degrees of necessity, he finally drives the bargain which ap- 
pears to him to be the best. He has merely bought and paid for an 
incompetent servant. These poor devils never get a chance to lift their 
heads above water. Capable, perhaps, of giving competent service if 
given half an opportunity, they continually find themselves so financially 
embarassed that they are at the mercy of every scheming seeker for their 
services. Their incompetence is perpetuated by these schemers and bar- 
gainers, who merely comprise another race of incompetents. The thing 
runs through our social and economic fabric, as the law of prey runs 
through the animal kingdom. 

There is, of course, the more exceptional incompetent who is so clever that 
he is long in being discovered, and who waxes fat in the meantime. But he can 
be avoided if one will take the trouble. 

To what degree is incompetence fostered by the educational systems through 
which men and women enter the various professions? To what degree is in- 
competence allowed to experiment upon the public by reason of that premise 
which assumes that the ability to secure work confers the right to practice? How 
far has incompetence been encouraged by either the desire or the necessity of 
obtaining a remunerative practice within the shortest possible space of time, 
and at a period when the ramifications of every profession are becoming so 
increasingly extensive that it can scarcely be true that the preparatory stages 
may be made less and less thorough ? And last, but by no means least, what is 
the degree of incompetence due to the selection of a profession as a mere means 
of livelihood and nothing more? No .study of professional incompetence would 
be complete unless it included all of these phases — a long, difficult; and perhaps 
impossible accomplishment. 

But the answer of the incompetent public, disappointed in a particular in- 
stance, is ever the same. The profession, whichever one it may happen to be, 
is wholly at fault, and all of its members are included in the sweeping anathema 
which the disappointed buyer sows broadcast. It has always been so. Probably 
it will always be so. It is sure to be so as long as we have no higher standard, 
and no better understanding, of the professional relation, or as long as the pres- 
ent economic system deludes people into the belief that the price of a thing 
re]>resents its cost. 

The reverse of the picture is quite true, since competent men are continually 
seeking their kind. The competent man is not deluded by any magical quality 
of title, and wishes to know something of the man who stands behind it. He 
engages professional services on some other basis than that of price or a mere 
social relation. To him, the selection of an architect is perhaps the least difficult 
of his problems, for of all works which are writ so large that all men may read, 
that of the architect is surely not the least. It requires no extraordinary mental 
powers to make a judicious selection of the man who is to be given charge of an 
important building operation. One has only to lay sentiment aside, and cast loose 
from the thought of trying to secure service for less than it costs the architect to 
give it. Those are the two popular delusions which operate to befog the owner. 
It is through theiu that architectural as well as all other forms of professional 



The Architect and lingiiiecr 91 

incompetence drag out their miserable existence, — a tax upon those who buy, 
upon those who sell, and a dead weight hung about the neck of society. 

The deplorable feature, so far as any profession is concerned, is that the 
most honorable, upright and conscientious practitioners are forced to pursue 
their task of trying to raise the standard of the profession, while enduring and 
combating the opprobrium called down upon them by their incompetent 
brethren. But such is the very reason why professional standards rise so slowly, 
— it is sometimes amazing that they are able to rise at all. The one remedy is a 
higher standard of ])ersonal responsibility, quite as much to the employee as to 
the employer, and a different conception of the relation of any work to life 
itself. 

In his answer to the article to which we have reference, and which appears 
in the Real Estate Magazine, Mr. Ackerman (M) seems to sum up the whole 
matter in a very few words : 

"There are in the profession many men possessing ability, integrity, and 
sincerity of purpose, whose aim in life is to raise the practice of architecture to 
the highest level. It rests absolutely with the clients to say whether these men 
shall be rewarded for these qualities and assisted in their effort. Such reward 
and assistance every owner can contribute to architecture ; this much he can do 
toward maintaining a-nd elevating the standards of the profession." 

To such an attitude on the part of a steadily increasing number of clients 
every competent professional man and woman is extending a hand of grateful 
welcome. 

* 

May Be Competition for State Building 

ARCHITECTS throughout the state of California are naturally much 
interested in the plans of the authorities relative to designing the proposed 
$1,000,000 state building in San Francisco and the two or more other 
State buildings in Sacramento, for which a total bond issue of $4,000 000 was 
voted by the people at the November election. Inquiries at the office of 
State Engineer W . F. McClure brought out very little definite information. 
It is quite probable the engineering and architectural departments of the 
state will design the Sacramento buildings, while the San Francisco build- 
ing may be open to competition. This would please the San Francisco 
architects very much, and a petition to this end has been circulated. As the 
building is to be erected in the new Civic Center, it will, of course, be necessary 
for whoever does the work to keep the design in harmony with the other struc- 
tures already erected and to be built there. Officials of the State engineering de- 
partment have volunteered the information that nothing will be done about 
the plans for any of the buildings until the entire bond issue has been sold. 
Petitions, asking for a competition for the San I<"rancisco building, have been 
circulated and generously signed. 

* 
* * 

American Institute of Architects to Design Bridges 

The American Institute of Architects, through its president. R. Clipston 
Sturgis, of Washington, D. C, has offered to the Lincoln Highway Association 
its services in designing appropriate arches, bridges and tablets for use along 
the route. This patriotic offer has been accepted by the association as being 
of inestimable value in securing designs of a uniform character from the best 
minds of the architectural profession of America. Competitions will be held 
between members of the Institute. 

Wealthy men who have been patriotically considering the erecting of 
memorial tablets or arches along this route will be enabled to secure through 
the Institute of Architects the best that the nation has to offer in design. 



92 The Architect and Engineer 

Notes on Effect of Earthquake Shock on Buildings 

By OCTAVIUS MORGAN, Fellow A. I. A.* 

HAVING no other paper to put before you, I have been asked to talk a little 
on Messina. It seemed v€ry timely, in view of the late earthquake in 
Italy. 

One of my reasons for visiting Sicily, in addition to looking up lemon 
culture, was to satisfy my mind of the reasons for the great loss of life by 
reason of earthquakes in Sicily and Italy by the destruction of buildings. 

You remember we had a quite serious earthquake on this coast some eight 
years ago. I was in San Francisco at the time of the fire and before the effects 
of the earthquake were obliterated. I about came to the conclusion that a well- 
constructed building, even of brick or stone was not subject to total destruction 
by an earthquake shock, unless of much greater severity than that of 1906. I 
have concluded that the loss of buildings at Palo Alto was largely due to very 
ill-advised construction. 

Getting back to Messina. I arrived there about nine in the morning, hired 
a native light carriage, and with my courier took a very thorough view of the 
city that was. I was surprised to see how little had been done, beyond clearing 
the streets, toward the rebuilding of the city. San Francisco was in better con- 
dition ninety days after its destruction than Messina was four years after. 
Apparently the destruction was so total, the loss of life so great among its 
citizens of all classes, that new blood had to be brought in to make a new start. 
When I was told that ninety-five thousand out of a population of one hundred 
twenty thousand has been destroyed, I began to realize the reason for the slow- 
ness in the rebuilding of the city. 

As you know, the American people subscribed a large sum of relief money, 
and also a great many ready-made frame houses were shipped, in their knock- 
down state — enough of them that they were enabled to house some eight or ten 
thousand people. And this today is called the American City, the streets being 
named after American admirals and other prominent citizens. The only hotel 
of any import at this time in Messina is a two-story, frame, rambling hotel, 
such as we might erect at the seaside. When I stopped here it seemed very 
familiar to me. This new town is laid out with wide streets, and apparently it 
will be developed into a new Messina with good buildings. They have already 
opened up .a wide and straight street, well-paved, near and parallel to the old 
town, and it is being lined at this time with one-story business houses, and 
down toward the harbor a number of large reinforced concrete warehouses and 
business houses are in the course of erection. It seems simpler and easier to 
reconstruct a new town on a new site than to clear up the ruins of the old city, 
except along on the water front. 

Now, we understand why the property owners of San Francisco showed 
such energy in the reconstruction of the city on its old lines. You can imagine 
the enormous destruction of values in real estate if the city had been permitted 
to move to a new site or to Oakland, as an effort was made by some to do. 

In my saunterings amidst the Messina ruins, I had ample oppbrtunitv to 
observe the construction of the old buildings. The building that suffered per- 
haps the least in the earthquake was the opera house. The buttresses, the 
galleries, and the heavy roof trusses had apparently kept the walls tied together, 
preventing their collapsing inwardly or outwardly, the end walls being the 
only ones that were thrown down and out. It being a more modern structure 
was fairly well anchored. 

You know the general construction of all the old buildings was of stone, 

* Of Morean. Walls & Morgan. Architects, Van Nuvs Bldg.. Los Angeles. Paper read before the 
Southern California Chapter, American Institute of Architects, February 9, 1915. 



The Architect and Engineer 93 

with but little wood used. The floors were generally vaulted — some very flat. 
The masonry was often rubble work, and where a squared stone was used little 
attention was paid to bonding them together. Now it was plain to be the 
reason of the total destruction and enormous loss of life. The streets of Mes- 
sina, as in nearly all other Sicilian. Italian and old Spanish cities, were very 
narrow. There was little wheel traffic at the time they were founded, it being 
in the good old days of the pack animal. Imagine what happened when the 
shocks of the earthquake came. The walls went out, the domed floors came 
down, catching all those who were in the building under the floors, and all 
those who had rushed to the streets under the walls that had fallen outward. 
When I had before me the narrow streets, and the construction of the buildings, 
my mind was clear why the loss of life was so enormous. I had previously 
thought that fire might have had something to do with the loss. But no. Little 
timber was used in construction. It was only in a few of the mercantile struc- 
tures, where the contents furnished the fuel for the fire, that damage to amount 
to anything was caused by that means. The method of the stone construction, 
and the almost entire lack of anchors, either metal or wood, was, together with 
the narrow streets, the real reason for the total destruction of the city, and 
enormous loss of life. 

I was taken to the barracks. There was a total ruin ! I was told that 75 
per cent of the four or five thousands of soldiers staying there at that time 
were lost in the ruins. Round and round I went, and wondered anyone was 
saved who happened to be in the districts where the destruction was so great. 

It was pitiful to see the fountains and monuments, with their beautiful 
carvings, surrounded by such utter chaos — ruin. These monuments, fountains 
and other pieces of sculpture were in great number, and very beautiful. But 
you all, without doubt, have seen illustrations of them, and it is not necessary 
for me to dwell on them. 

When I got on higher ground and looked across the strait, my mind could 
but dwell on history. Scylla and Charybdis were before me. The current was 
swift. The line of surf covering the rocks made me realize the terrors of this 
strait in the days of the galley and clumsy sailing ships of 2500 years ago. 
Even today, the current is so swift at certain stages of the tide that it needs a 
good steamer to make the passage. 

When I have picked up the papers during the last few weeks and have read 
of the losses through earthquake shock, all has seemed plain to me, and rather 
a matter of course. These losses were unavoidable in cities or villages planned 
v/ith such narrow streets, and lined with stone buildings of such poor construc- 
tion. Man, in Sicily, in Italy, is more gregarious than anywhere else. Their 
towns are like prairie dog villages. It matters not how small the village or 
how large the city, all houses are huddled and crowded together against all 
reason of proportion, convenience and sanitation, and apparently if there is a 
level piece of ground equally convenient, they will seek a hill or mountain side 
and pile one house above the other, even like a lot of clifif dwellers. When we 
think, there is a reason for this. In the good old days there were pirates, land 
pirates and sea pirates, and in union was strength and safety. 

It is wonderful how these people hold to old locations. When an earth- 
quake has destroyed the town, they will rebuild it in exactly the same spot, 
vv'ith the houses on the same sites. I presume it is the climate and the soil. 
These people are content with a living. A few acres will give them a little 
wine, a little corn, a few beans, a few olives. This is all they need, and the even 
climate makes them require little either in the way of clothing or fuel. The 
only fuel they use is a few handfuls of brush or a little charcoal. This is even 
made from limbs of trees that apparently were not more than an inch or so in 
diameter. All the timber having been stripped from Sicily thousands of years 



94 The Architect and Engineer 

ago, except on the slopes of Etna, the only trees left today are fruit trees. Soil 
is too precious to be wasted to raise anything but food-producing trees. 

Talking of soil brings to my mind many a view of the peasants, women and 
children, gathering soil between the rocks on the mountain side, in baskets 
which they placed on their heads and packed to their terraced homes, to furnish 
soil in which they could plant an olive or some other fruit tree. 

I spent a day and a half in Messina, and about 2 o'clock started for Palermo. 
Truly, this was a beautiful ride, following the sinuous lines of the coast. I was 
very sorry when darkness came on, about an hour before reaching Palermo — 
which is another story. 

Sicily was truly the most interesting point on my trip. I spent two weeks 
there, and, much as I have read, it was a new book to me. The sterile, barren, 
sulphur mountains and valleys of the interior are the best exemplification of 
desolation that one could imagine. You are not surprised that there are 
brigands in that land, for the only money that could be in that country must 
come from the outside. It is true, on the coast line there are fertile valleys, 
some of them quite extensive, and these were the sites of those old Grecian 
cities, the ruins of the temples in which are so well preserved and interesting. 
I was reading the other day that some of these temples are as old as those of 
-■\thens, which you know were built with the wealth acquired by the plunder of 
the camps of Xerxes. These temples in Sicily were built from plunder of the 
camps of Hamilcar, the Carthaginian. So, you see, war as well as commerce 
has produced the greatest rewards to the architect, the victor spending the 
spoils of war in self-glorification in beautiful buildings. That is, a man is more 
free to spend the spoils of war than that which he has earned by the sweat of 
his brow. 

Marks in Wood Record Heavy Wind Storms 

LITTLE diagonal streaks or wrinkles across the grain of a piece uf timber 
not only betray weakness, .but sometimes indicate periods of stress 
through which the wood passed when it was growing. They may even 
be taken as a sort of check on the official record of wind storms, as in tha 
case of some lumber tested at the forest service laboratory at Madison, 
Wisconsin. 

The marks are caused by what are called "compression failures." which 
occur when the fibers bend or buckle under a too heav}' strain. In cutting 
up logs collected for experiments at the laboratory, it was noticed that 
these compression failures appeared on the north side of a number of trees 
which came from the same locality in Florida. By counting the annual 
rings of the wood and from knowledge of the time when it was cut in the 
forest, it was decided that the compression failures must have been caused 
by a severe wind from the south about the year 1898. Inquiries were made 
in Florida and it was found that a hurricane had. in fact, svve]3t over the 
region at the time indicated. 

The experiments have determined that the strength of a piece of wood 
may be seriously impaired by slight compression failures due to rough 
handling. Dropping a beam across a skid may cause a compression failure 
at the point at wdiich the beam strikes the skid and it will be at this point 
that the beam gives way when it breaks under a strain too severe for the 
weakened fibers to withstand. Hitherto unaccountable breakage in hickory 
wagon spokes and other presumably strong material are now attributed to 
compression failures caused by wind storms in the period of growth or liy 
hard usage in lumbering and manufacturing processes. 



The Architect and Engineer 95 

Economic Waste of Architectural Competitions* 

By J. E. ALLISON, A. L A. 
"~1~ HE profession of architecture calls for men of the highest integrity, busi- 
I ness capacity and artistic ability. The architect is intrusted with financial 
undertakings in which his honesty of purpose must be above suspicion : 
he acts as professional adviser to his client and his advice must be absolutely 
disinterested : he is charged with the exercise of judicial functions as between 
client and contractors and must act with entire impartiality ; he has moral re- 
sponsibilities to his professional associates and subordinates ; finally, he is 
engaged in a profession which carries with it grave responsibilities to the public. 
These duties and responsibilities can not be properly discharged unless his 
motives conduct and ability are such as to command respect and confidence." 

The American Institute of Architects, the recognized ofiicial society of the 
profession, seeking to maintain a high standard of practice and conduct on the 
part of its members as a safeguard of the important financial, technical and 
aesthetic interests intrusted to them, offers advice relative to architecttiral com- 
petitions resultant from many years of experience and observation as to cause 
and effect as follows : 

"A competition, when properly conducted, is a means of selecting an archi- 
tect. As an incident, a good preliminarv scheme may sometimes be obtained, 
but the Institute is of the opinion that competitions are in the main of no ad- 
vantage to the owners. It therefore recommends that, except in cases in which 
competitions are unavoidable, an architect be employed upon the sole basis of 
his fitness for the work." 

The profession, of course, concedes to the owner, who holds the purse, the 
right to select an architect by competition if he chooses to do so, and to the 
end that the interests of both owner and architect may best be conser\-ed when 
competition is desired, has prescribed a method of conducting them which is 
fair and equitable to both, and which, if followed, will attract and interest many 
of the ablest men in the profession. 

A competition even when properly conducted is somewhat tedious and ex- 
pensive, and for small buildings, say $100,000 or less, is considered altogether 
too cumbersome for the advantages it aflfords. 

It requires that the owner shall select and employ an expert advisor to 
prepare a programme of competition setting forth all of its conditions and 
including at least the following essentials : 

( a ) A contract between owners and competitors with reference to the 
judgment and award. 

(b) Provision for the qualifying of all competitors who shall participate, 
as to training, experience and fitness, to execute the work if selected. 

(c) A jtiry of experts to assist the advisor and owners in judging the 
relative merits of the designs submitted. 

(d) A maximimi limit for the cubical contents of the building determined 
by the limit of cost. 

(e) Absolute anonimitv as regards the identity of the authors of the 
designs. 

(f) Proper remuneration for those architects who shall give of their time 
and thought for the benefit of the owner, and such other provisions as are set 
forth in the Circular of .\dvice of the .American Institute of Architects. 

\Mth all of these conditions properly met, and the verdict still remaining 
■'that competitions are in the main of no advantage to the owners," how much 
of an actual detriment and disadvantage must they be under conditions that 

* This article refers more particularly to school competitions as conducted in Southern California, and 
is part of an address delivered by Mr. .\11ison before the Los .\ngeles School Board. 



96 The Architect and Engineer 

obtain in many of the so-called competitions as conducted all about us here in 
Southern California and in which many architects continue to participate, and 
to even scramble for the opportunity of so doing. 

These so-called competitions include no such provisions as above mentioned 
for safeguarding the interests of either owner or architect; no professional 
advisor, no adequate programme, no binding contract, no jury, no anonimity, 
no remuneration except for the one selected. On the contrary, the invitations 
usually read, and somewhat reassuringly, "the board reserves the right to 
reject any or all plans and specifications submitted," and "the board will not pay 
for any of the designs submitted except the one that may be adopted," and in 
fact does not agree to adopt any of the designs submitted unless they see fit; 
finally "they will pay five per cent, or less, for full service including supervision, 
to the architect whose plans and specifications may be selected," while six per 
cent is the recognized minimum fee charged for first-class architectural service 
everywhere. 

This condition of affairs is greatly to be regretted as having a directly 
demoralizing effect upon the architecture of our public buildings, and also upon 
the status of our profession in the eyes of the public. Nevertheless, it can not 
be denied that the profession (or rather those members of the profession who 
indulge in such competitions) is largely responsible with the owner for these 
conditions, because such members do not exercise their prerogative forcefully 
and diplomatically in informing the usually inexperienced owner of the evils 
of this system, and because when their advice is sought and given, and in the 
end disregarded by the owners, these architects very often, by subsequently 
entering the competitions, weaken their position and eventually lose the respect 
and confidence of the owner both for themselves and for what they are sup- 
posed to stand. Furthermore, these architects evidently do not very carefully 
count the cost of this system to their professional reputation or its resultant 
effect upon the aesthetic value of their finished work, elements large as a de- 
lerminig factor for ultimate success or failure, nor do they count the cost to 
the owner who actually employs them. 

A little analytical reflection on the part of the architect from this angle as 
regards himself and his work, and a little mathematical calculation on behalf of 
the owner should convince him that it is a losing game for both, for the owner 
pays the entire cost of such a competition, and very often a great deal more ; but 
not however to the architect whom he thus employs. 

To demonstrate just how this operates, let me cite you a typical example : 

We will select out of the many school buildings being erected from plans 
procured by this competitive system, say ten high schools costing $100,000 per, 
for each of which ten architects compete, this number being perhaps a fair 
average, although I am told that in a recent competition for a $30,000 school 
twenty per cent of plans were submitted by as many architects. 

The apportionment of the entire fee for preliminary sketches made by the 
American Institute of Architects is one per cent @f the cost of the building, 
but to give the owners the full benefit of any doubt that may exist as to the 
actual cost of such competitive sketches, we will assume that the cost of each 
of the ten competitions to each of the ten competitors is one-fourth of one per 
cent, or $250 each ; or $2500 for the ten competitions. 

By equitable good fortune each of the ten competitors, we will say, is suc- 
cessful in being selected for one building, which might be fair and would not 
deprive any brother architect of his share. Is it not a fact that each of these 
ten competitors has, in due course, spent in order to win his one building $2500 
or one-half of the entire 5 per cent fee which he will receive for full service? 
If so, he is confronted with the fact that out of the remaining l^A per cent of 



Tlic Architect and Engineer 97 

liis fee he must not only execute the entire work with that high degree of pro- 
ficiency expected for the owner, and with due credit for himself, but he must 
also have at least living profit. 

Statistics have proven that in the best managed architects' offices the mini- 
mum cost of producing proper working plans and specifications is from 2^/^ 
to 3J/2 per cent of the cost of the building, to say nothing of the full-sized 
detail drawings and supervision of construction. It goes without saying there- 
fore, that the architect who has thus spent half of the fee in winning the job. 
must of necessity minimize in the work and curtail the study given to the plans, 
specifications and details in order to avoid actual loss to himself. And what 
is the result? Incomplete data, shortages, ambiguities, discrepancies, etc., 
resulting invariably in high bidding by the contractors, plus innumerable dis- 
putes, misunderstandings, extras. law suits and various other griefs incident 
to cheap architectural service ; and last, but not least, when the building is 
finished he has a structure that is below par in quality, design and appointment, 
and at an excess cost ranging from 5 to 15, and sometimes 20 per cent of its 
total cost. 

Right here is where you pay for the whole cost of the so-called competitive 
system in dollars and cents and otherwise, and your building usually stands 
for a long time to remind you of how it happened. 



Panama Canal Counts 

PHILADELPHIA business men are beginning to feel the benefits of 
the Panama canal, says the traffic editor of the Public Ledger. For 
a number of months there has been an increase in business between 
this port and the Pacific Coast. This was first noticed in the large increase 
of dried and canned fruits and wine. 

Business from the Pacific Coast is expected to be rapidly increasing in 
tonnage by heavy shipments of Californ-a magnesite and kaolin. In the 
past virtually all of the magnesite and china clay used in the eastern and 
middle states has been imported, the bulk of the magnesite coiuing from 
Austria and most of the clay from England. Although there are large 
deposits of both materials in California, it was not profitable to ship to 
the Atlantic states because of the high rail charges. 

Both of these American products are superior to the foreign products, 
and, with the all-water haul, they can be landed in Philadelphia cheaper 
than they can be imported. Two experts on magnesite have pronounced 
the California article superior to any in the world. 

In speaking of the kaolin, another expert said that last year about 
250,000 tons of this product were imported for use in pottery, paint and 
chemical plants. 

Plants and Flowers from European Countries 

Shipments of rare unnamed roses and other plants have been made from 
Luxemburg, France and Great Britain to be entered for the $1,000 prize 
offered by the Panama-Pacific International Exposition for the most per- 
fect new variety of rose. The seven commissioners of the Netherlands 
government to the exposition report that they have assembled from all of 
the principal cities of Holland the most extensive horticultural exhibit ever 
sent to America from a foreign country. Many rare bulbs have already reached 
the Exposition grounds from Holland. 



98 i he Arclntcct and Eiioinccr 

Suggestions for Light Concrete Floor Construction 
in the Concrete House 

By MILTON DANA MORRILL. Architect, in Concrete-Cement Age. 

IN a $600,000 residence lately put up on Long Island, N. Y., the builder, a 
man of progressive fiber, wishing to give a better construction than was 
called for by the plans, offered to put in a fireproof interior, including rein- 
forced concrete floors and partitions, at the comparatively small additional cost 
of $600. 

The owner, however, did not appreciate the value of having his house fire- 
proof, and did not accept the offer, and this fine home was built, as is the 
custom, with a mass of dry pitch-pine lumber put together like a tinder-box, 
only needing the smallest spark to start the blaze which in a few minutes' 
time could destroy not only the fine house with its priceless antique furnishings, 
but might prove a great hazard to the members of the family, who might be 
entombed therein. 

This illustrates the fact that the public, as a rule, does not today realize in 
the smallest way the worth and value of proper construction, and "they know 
not what they build." 

There may still be an excuse for frame construction in the cheapest and 
most temporary dwellings, but if the home owner realized the advantage and 
added protection offered his family through the use of a permanent fireproof 
type of building, progress would be much more rapid and safe and sane con- 
struction would be the universal order of the day. 

Little by little headway is gained and masonry and fireproof walls are 
taking the place of frame, but sight is beitig lost of the most vital part of 
the house, the floor construction. 

In several instances in concrete houses the entire frame interior has been 
gutted by fire, leaving the walls standing structurally uninjured and ready for 
rebuilding and re-use. 

While this is a test which no other form of construction ordinarily outlives, 
and shows reinforced concrete as the superior wall construction, it also shows 
that only so far as a house is concrete is it fireproof, and it shows further that 
if concrete is good for walls it is still better and more valuable for floors and 
partitions. There its use will effectively block any general conflagration and 
confine any small fire to the floor or the apartment of its -origin. 

In houses a much lighter reinforced concrete construction can be employed 
than is used in other buildings. The architect or builder is likely to consider 
reinforced concrete from the masonry standpoint and is, therefore, inclined 
toward thick walls and heavy beamed floors. But counting inch for inch of 
structural section, reinforced concrete is a stronger building material than 
wood, and in the average house spans a reinforced slab four inches thick is 
more than equivalent to the floor built up with ten-inch wood joists, and the 
four-inch reinforced partition is far more substantial than the six-inch in thick- 
ness made up of studding, lath and plaster. 

The ideal floor slab for light construction is of the flat or paneled type, 
with a light basket weave of wire, secured and supported on four sides, with 
just enough concrete for stiffening. The .strength of such a slab is remarkable 
and far in excess of 'the tabulated strength generally credited to it. This was 
brought forcefully to the writer's attention during the construction of the 
forty concrete houses in the Nanticoke group, and in the tests there employed, 
and further in the eight concrete houses built near Montreal by the Canada 
Cement Company, where -1-inch slabs on 12-foot spans were used, and wood 
sleepers, 1^4 inches in depth were bedded in these slabs, giving a structural 



The Architect and Eiii;iueer 



99 



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slab of only 2 '4 inches in thickness; yet these thin slabs were much more firm 
and substantial than are the usual wooden floors. 

The average builder would hesitate to employ such construction and would 
question its stability. But the proof is there, where any one may see. 

A suggestion is here given (see accompanying sketches) for a hollow 
paneled floor slab which might be used with considerable advantage in house 
building. It is intended to be constructed over inverted steel box forms, so 
shaped that they may be easily removed and used over and over again. The 
lightness and general substantial character of such a slab are apparent and 
need little comment or description. The sleepers are bedded in the members, 
3' o. c, forming the panels. Metal lath and plaster are to be applied on the 
under side of these panels. 



Coming Convention will Interest Coast Architects 

By CHARLES S. KAISER, A. I. A. 

THE attention of architects is called to the coming meeting of the American 
School Hygiene Association, which is to be held in San Francisco June 
25th and 26th, under the patronage of the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition. The educational exhibit of the Exposition is itself very 
comprehensive and interesting, and it is planned to supplement this with 
an exhibit of the most progressive and hygienic types among the schools of 
California. 

This will be the eighth congress of the national association, last year's 
meeting having been postponed on account of the war. The congress of 1913, 
it will be recalled, was merged into the Fourth International Congress on 
School Hygiene, very successfully held at Bufifalo. 

Further announcement will be made as soon as the programme of this com- 
ing congress has taken more definite shape, but it is to be expected that the 
papers and discussions will have the same great practical value as those that 
appear in, the proceedings of former congresses. 

It is hoped to place the importance of the hygiene movement as re])resented 
;n this congress of the American School Hygiene Association strongly before 
all those who are responsible for health conditions in our public schools. 
Among these responsible people the architects of the country certainly have a 
great deal to answer for. Every architect with the remotest interest in schools 
should become a member of this congress and study its proceedings, whether 
expecting to attend or not. Dr. Wm. Palmer Lucas is secretary-treasurer. 



100 The Architect and Eiij^incer 

The Swaying of Tall Buildings 

THE city of Chicago, built as it is on substrata of clay, furnishes the 
most interesting study of the movement of buildings, and the greatest 
number and variety of examples. All of the early skyscrapers of that 
city were carried on floating foundations or on piles driven deep into the 
clay. These buildings without exception settled into the soil due to their 
weight, the distances they settled varying from three to over live inches. 
Many of these buildings, notably the Great Northern Hotel, are partially 
carried on jacks and periodically levelled up as settlements occur, then, 
after all subsidence has taken place, and the buildings have finally come to 
rest, the jacks are removed and the foundation walls filled in with masonry. 

That is one of the movements of buildings, then, settlement; but settle- 
ment takes place only in those buildings erected on floating foundations. 
When the footings are extended down to bed rock, as all footings for 
present day buildings in Chicago are, the amount of settlement that takes 
place is nil and may be disregarded. 

But even buildings with their footings carried to bed rock lean or are 
racked out of plumb, and the taller the buildings the more they are likely 
to lean, although the amount they are out of plumb is seldom enough to 
endanger the structure. Recently the Unity building at Chicago was 
straightened, being considered "unsafe, but not dangerous," at thirty inches 
out of plumb. It is impossible to prevent the big buildings from leaning. 
Some of them are not straight when they are finished, but that does not 
impair their safety, and it is probably safe to say that every building in 
Chicago leans more or less. If they are on floating foundations they also 
settle gradually. But there is still another movement of buildings, and 
the most interesting of them all to consider. For instance, the Eiffel tower 
swings perceptibly in the wind, and even stone shafts like those of the 
Bunker Hill and Washington monuments move several inches at the top. 
The side that is towards the sun expands during the day more than the 
side in shadow. 

An interesting device has been employed to show the movement of the dome 
of the capitol at Washington. A wire was hung from the middle of the dome 
inside the building down to the floor of the rotunda, and on the lower end of the 
wire was hung a 25-pound plumb bob. In the lower point of the weight was 
inserted a lead pencil, the point of which just touched the floor. A large sheet of 
paper was spread out beneath it. As the dome moved, it dragged the pencil over 
the paper every day. The mark made was in the form of an ellipse six 
inches long. The dome would start moving in the morning as soon as 
the rays of the sun began to act upon it ; and slowly, as the day advanced, 
the pencil would be dragged in a curve across the paper until sundown, 
when a reaction would take place and the pencil would move back to its 
starting point. But it would not go back over its own penciled track, 
for the cool air of night would cause the dome to contract as much on 
the one side as the sun had made it expand on the other, and so the pencil 
would form the other half of the ellipse, getting back to the original point 
all ready to start out again by sunrise. 

In the three movements affecting tall and heavy buildings we have, 
then, particularly in the expansion and contraction movement which is of 
daily occurrence, and which aft'ects skyscraper buildings as well as all other 
tall structures, a condition which must be taken into consideration when 
planning the buildings. Lines of steam pipes, stocks of draining pipes, 
lengths of water pipes, vacuum cleaning pipes, refrigeration system pipes, 
electric wire conduits and the various networks of tubing which cross and 
criss cross inside of a building will naturally be more or less affected by 



The Architect and Engineer 101 

the movements of the building'; and if long life is expected of these various 
systems of piping, they must be so installed that they can "give" under the 
movements of the building without damage to the piping, and sufficient to 
compensate for the change of position. 

Besides pointing out the necessity for flexibility for the piping systems 
in tall buildings, the movement of buildings shows how desirable it is to 
have solid foundations, the footings of which extend down to bed rock. 
Floating foundations are all right for some kinds of buildings, but for 
the skyscraper type there is nothing so good as the solid rock of old 
Mother Earth. 



California's Architectural Contribution 

From The School Board Journal. 

WITH originality and boldness, characteristic of their native state, 
California architects have recently developed two distinctly valu- 
able forms, or types, of school buildings. The older, and more 
common, is the one-story elementary building, built around a central court, 
and resembling the old Spanish buildings which date from the early 
mission days. The second type is the group high school, in which each 
distinct set of studies is housed in a separate structure, suited to the 
specific needs. 

The typical California "mission" school house is nearly ideal for the 
climatic conditions of the state. The open cloisters afford shelter from the 
glare and heat of the summer, and protection against the rain and wind 
of the winter. At the same time, they allow plenty of fresh air under all 
conditions. The one-story buildings afford a minimum expense for con- 
struction and maintenance, and a maximum of safety against fire, panics 
and other dangers found in the compactly built school houses of the eastern 
states. E.xcept for the greater ground area which they occupy — an objec- 
tion that has no weight except in large cities — the mission type school has 
hardly a fault worth mentioning. 

The group high school has been found in California to be the most 
economical, flexible, adaptable type of building devised thus far. Usually 
it is begun with a single unit that provides accommodations for the admin- 
istrative offices and for academic class rooms. Buildings for manual arts, 
natural sciences, household arts, physical education, assembly, etc., are added 
as the needs arise, as the student body increases and as the financial ab'lity 
of the district permits. Each group of studies has a structure e> :i tly 
planned for its use. There is no interference or disturbance of dejiartmLUts, 
and the whole is held together as a school by the principal and his 
assistants. Architecturally the group becomes a civic and social center, 
each building expressing its purpose unmistakably and contributing to the 
unity and beauty of the whole. 

While these two California types of school houses may not be adapted 
for use in many states of the union, they emphasize the need of original 
thinking in school house planning. They make evident b_y comparison the 
failure of the south, of the southern states of the north central group, and 
of the mountain states to study the problems of housing the local schools 
in structures characteristic of the country, adapted to the climate and the 
native conditions. 

There is a very real need in American school architecture for less imita- 
tion and less following of precedent. IMore vigorous, independent and bold 
initiative, applied with due consideration of proven principles is essential, 
if we are to have, in every section of the United States, a true, characteristic 
school architecture. 



102 The Architect and Eni^inccr 

The Protection of Stone Work 

MANY architects are opposed to the use of stone because of its dis- 
coloration, due to dripping of dirty water, iron rust and verdigris 
from copper and bronze. Those who have followed the stone con- 
tracting business say that with a little care a stone building can be kept as 
clean as a brick or terra cotta one. 

The specifications for stonework may be prepared with great care, call- 
ing for stone of the highest grade, of uniform color, free from sap, stains, 
knots, "niggerheads," shakes, or other defects, to be coated with water- 
proof paint on backs, beds and joints, and to be set in non-staining cement. 
But how often do the specifications contain a single reference to the care 
of the stone from the time it leaves the mill until it is set in the wall? 
It is the rule rather than the exception to find beautiful cut stone work 
dumped on the ground promiscuously and left to absorb the moisture 
from the dirt, to be covered with soot, and to be trampled on by workmen 
and others around the building. It may even get drippings of oil or other 
liquids that penetrate deep into the pores of the stone. If stone that has 
been so abused goes into the wall it is next to impossible to use any 
methods of cleaning to restore its original beautiful color. If it were not 
that the precaution is so frequently neglected, it would hardly seem neces- 
sary to say that all cut stone delivered to the building site which is not 
immediately to be used should be piled on boards that are raised a few 
inches from the ground, and thoroughly covered with tarpaulin, waterproof 
paper, or in some other way. 

Architects are inclined to pay far too little attention to damp courses 
at grade. Probably every one has noted the appearance of otherwise 
beautiful stone buildings marred by reason of the fact that no damp 
courses, or because imperfect damp courses, had been provided at the 
grade line. The result of this is that moisture from the foundation and dirt 
carelessly thrown up against the bottom course of stone is absorbed bv the 
stone, which becomes discolored and unsightly. This lack of protection 
assumes a greater importance where the soils contain alkalies, for these 
salts are drawn up by capillarity, and evaporating on the surface leave a 
skin or efflorescence that is very disfiguring. 

Far too little attention is also paid to proper provision for the carrying 
off of water from stone work. This is especially true of porticoes and flights 
of steps. In projecting overhead work the water is allowed to seep down 
from the courses of stone work and consequently they are almost contin- 
ually water soaked, discolored, and a condition favorable to disintegration 
and decay is present. Many architects fail to provide reasonably adequate 
drips under projecting courses, with the result that the water washes the 
d'rt and soot down over the face of the wall. With the increased popularity 
of rubbed and tooled surfaces for stone work, it is not uncommon to see 
the entire fronts of immense buildings with not a single ])rojection from 
the cornice to the water table, even the sills and lintels being set flush 
with the wall. The result of this is that the moisture gathering in the 
window spaces is not thrown off by the wash and drip of the sills, but runs 
down the face of the wall, so that there are regular spaces of staining 
between each floor. 

It is interesting to consider what may be the reason for this lack of 
protection from weather conditions. Probably it is due to the interest in 
Classical and Renaissance architecture. The builders who wrought in these 
styles did not have severe weather conditions to meet, as a rule. The 
structures went up in a warm and dry climate and even the most delicate 



The Architect and Engineer 103 

stone held' its color and texture. The Gothic builders on the contrary, had 
to confront frost and moisture, and it was necessary for them to guard 
against the ravages of the elements. In the Gothic buildings, drips are 
provided wherever necessary, and there are constant provisions for carry- 
ing the water from rain or snow far from the walls. The matter is one of 
great importance, and it is one to which the architects might well give 
more attention. 



An Exhibition Catalogue 

ARCHITECT HENRY A. SCHULZE sends us the following "Sing a 
Song o' Sixpence" taken from the American Architect of December 
8, 1888, and which seems to fit in very well just now with the open- 
ing of the Panama-Pacific Exposition : 

A correspondent of our contemporary, Fairplay, has unearthed a comic catalogue 
written in connection with the great exhibition of 1851. It certainly is rather 
entertaining. 

I've had a private view of the exhibition book, 

I mean the authorized catalogue, and from it straightway took 

The names and numbers of curious things to see. 

And curious you'll say they are, if you'll attend to me. 

No. I's A bucket of water taken from "All's well," 

No. 2's The coat that's worn by the Ocean's heavy swell, 

No. 3's The weight exact of a grain of common sense, 

No. 4's Some of the tar with which once Israel pitched their tents. 

No. 5's A pat of butter, made from the cream of a joke. 

No. 6's The tail of a pig that was got into a poke, 

No. 7's The gingham queer that Louis Philippe did borrow. 

No. 8's The saucer with which to match the cup of sorrow, 

No. 9's The loaf from which the crumb of comfort fell, 

No. lO's The brush that paints the signs of the times so well. 

No. ll's The marrow from the bone of contention taken. 

No. 12's The rasher of the man who saved his bacon, 

No. 13's The strap that sharpens up the water's edge. 

No. 14's The apple of the eye of faith, so they allege. 

No. IS's The two original stools thro' which the chap was floored. 

No. 16's The soap that washed the captain overboard. 

No. 17's The nose cut off our noble country's face. 

No. 18's The naughty gander caught in a wild goose chase. 

No. 19's A splinter taken from the River Styx, 

No. 20's From the house that Jack built, twenty bricks, 

No. 2rs The teeth from the Mississippi's mouth. 

No. 22's A Scotchman who never traveled South. 

No. 23's Some coins from the change of the moon, in pence. 

No. 24's A link from the chain of evidence. 

No. 2S's The wheel of fortune, spokes and staves. 

No. 26's The pen with which Britannia rules the waves, 

No. 27's The baby's mouth that was born with a silver spoon. 

No. 28's The swarm of bees that made the honey moon. 

No. 29's The bow that shot the shaft of ridicule. 

No. 30's A grammar from adversity's old school, 

No. 31's The bit of steel that made the Iron Age, 

No. 32's The livery worn by History's page, 

No. 33's The rock to mianufacture flinty hearts, 

No. 34's The barb from one of wicked Cupid's darts, • 

No. 3S's Some bits of daylight, picked up when morning broke.- 

No. 36's The cork that fits into the bottle of smoke. 

I've sung in numbers, and of numbers up to thirty-six; 
Success to Albert and the Queen, and all the little Vies; 
With parting directions, my ditty shall be done. 
But when you go to see the numbers, look out for number one. 



104 



The Architect and Eno-incer 



Ard)ttprt nnh Sngittrrr 

OR CAUIRORINIA 



Published Monthly in the interests of the 
Architects, Structural Engineers, Contract* 
ors and the Allied Trades of the Pacific 
Coast by the Architect and Engineer Co. 

Business Office and Editorial Rooms 

617-619 Monadnock Building:. San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 1828 



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ASSOCIATE EDITORS 


w 


M. B. Gestfr. ■ 




1 i?ispectton 


LoREN E. Hunt. C 


E. 


■ ■ t and Tests 


0. 

F, 


y. Shelley. C. E 

VV. F'lTZPATRICK 


\ Firfpt oof Construction 11 


W 


VV. BlIFlTF. C. 


E. 


Structural Hieel 


Athol McBfan ) 
W. E. Dknnison [ 


Hruk 


Tile ami Terra 
Cotta 


Howard Frost. ) 




G. 


B. ASHCROFT. C 


E. 


Artificial Stone 


H. M. T OWENTHAL 

J.K. D. Mackf.nzik 


- 1 

- ( 


Roofs and RooAng 


Fk 


ED M. Woods. Jr.. - 


Rock and Gravel 


w 


LBUR David Cook, l.uii 


iscaf>eA rchitecture 


T. 


C. KlERULFF 




Leg-al Points 


Pa 


UL C. BUTTF ■ 


FJrc 


trical (Construction 


Lc 


UlS F. M.AUER 




Waterproofing 


Ch 


..\RLES VV. FORTU 


^ 


[ Healing and 
\ i'cntilating 




ARCHITECTURAL 


Fr 


■d H. Mey.T 


V\ 


illiam 0. Kai«uel 


Au 


gust C;. HeRdman 


F 


U. Hudson 


Ed 


ward T. Foulkes 


Su 


inner P. Hum 


Alfred F. Rosenheim 


N 


irman F. Marsh 


G. 


Albert Lansbursh 


Si 


lilh O'Brien 


Ho 


UKhton Sawyer 


A 


nicric Coxhead 


He 


rnian Earth 


H 


irrison Albright 


.Ar 


hur Brown. Jr. 


Jo 


in Parkinson 


Ch 


as P. Weeks 


A 


\V. Smith 


Octavius MorKnn 


T 


Patlervon Ross 


J. C. Austin 


W 


illiam H. Weeks 


Tohn J. Donovan 


C 


as W Dickey 


W 


H.Ratcliff.Jr. 


H 


•nry C.Smith 




CONTRIBUTORS 


W 


I!. Faville 


Jo 


in Bakcwell. Jr. 


\v 


n, A. Neuinnn 


VV 


. Garden Mitchell 


Er 


nest Coxhi-ad 


Nathaniel RIai-deli II 


\V 


11. C. Hayes 


W 


. R. B. Wilcox 


Ch 


as. Henry Cheney 


V\ 


Iham Mooscr 


He 


rh.rt E Law 


R( 


bertMorceiieier 


Ho 


n. las. 1). Phelan 


B. 


J. S. Cahill 


Jul 


n Galen Howar, 


f !•• 


\. I. A. 


Lo 


uis C. MullgariU 


i 




E 


M C. Whitney 




Manager 


A. 


I. Whitney 




Treasurer 


Fk 


EDERiCK W. Jones 


Managins Editor 



After many years of agitation, 
definite action for the betterment of 
conditions in the 
IMPROVEMENT OF building industry 
BUILDING CON= has been taken. At 

DITIONS the annual meeting 

of the National 
Association of Builders' Exchanges 
held recently in Coluinbus, Ohio, a 
report was submitted outlining the 
conclusions reached by the joint 
committees of the exchanges and the 
American Institute of Architects. 
Many improvements in existing con- 
ditions were recommended, final de- 
cision on which will be taken at a 
conference with the architects at an 
early date. 

The necessity for an improvement 
an present conditions is evident. A 
more equitable method of settling 
disputes between the contractor, the 
architect and the owner is needed ; 
reforms in the methods of awarding 
contracts and the ethics governing 
estimating and bidding are desirable. 
With a uniform system of general 
conditions for building contracts, the 
contractor can conduct his business 
on a safer and saner basis. 



Architect R. A. Herold of Sacra- 
mento has entered a protest with San 
Francisco Chapter, 
A FINE POINT FOR A. I. A., against 
THE CHAPTER TO Messrs. Shea & 
RULE UPON Lofquist being 

awarded the work 
on the new Sacramento Hall of Jus- 
tice. Herold claims he held out for 
the Institute's fee of 6 per cent and 
that Messrs. Shea & Lofquist, with 
other architects, offered to do the 
work for less. The successful archi- 
tects claim that they are merely acting 
as a Consulting Board, the same as 
Messrs. Howard. Meyer and Reed are 
acting for the city of San Francisco, 
and that the actual plans have already 
been drawn for the building. Their 
task, they say, will be mainly to revise 
the drawings and superintend the work 
of construction. 

For this they argue the regulation 
6 per cent should not be charged. The 
Chapter has received a report on the 
matter from a special investigating 



The Architect and Ennnccr 



105 



committee, of which Mr. Martin of 
Los Angeles Chapter is the chairman. 
A report has been requested from 
Messrs. Shea & Lofquist, and until 
these reports have been submitted no 
action will be taken. 



ing for a building of this character, 
eaves of red tiling are used. 



A firm composed of two New York 
women architects, Schenck & Mead, 
has been awarded 
WOMEN ARCHI= the first prize in a 
TECTS WIN Chicago City club 

FIRST PRIZE competition for 

plans for a neigh- 
borhood center in any city. The place 
selected was a square mile of the 
Bronx, and within this district were 
planned parks, a library, schools, a 
ball room, "movies," etc. 

The incident is doubly significant of 
the extraordinary interest in neighbor- 
hood interests and of the peculiar fit- 
ness of women to deal with them. 



The brick court in the Palace of 
\'arie(l Industries at the Panama- 
Pacific International Expo- 
CREATIONS sition at San Francisco is 
IN BRICK one of the interesting ob- 
jectives of the daily sight- 
seeing pilgrimages which include this 
exhibit palace in their itinerary. 

Pausing at this place, the thousands 
of visitors from far and near behold 
a revelation of the artistic possibilities 
that lie in the combination of bricks of 
varied finishes and colors, besides see- 
ing a practical exhibit of the various 
structural features of a house that can 
be built from brick giving the satis- 
factory, composite result of substan- 
tiality, comfort and pleasing appear- 
ance. 

The entire floor, the three walls, the 
fireplace in the background with its 
mantel and hearth, the four corner 
columns of the structure, and an orna- 
mental column in the foreground are 
all creations in brick of varied styles, 
colors and patterns. 

The walls are the result of a con- 
tinuation of panels, each distinctive 
in color and pattern and made of brick 
in ever}' instance, but are united ac- 
cording to a plan that makes a har- 
monious, artistic, general effect. Sug- 
gesting the appropriate style of roof- 



Commencing with this issue the 
Architect and Engineer will publish 

each month the 
OFFICIAL MINUTES official minutes of 
OF SAN FRANCISCO all regular and 
CHAPTER, A. I. A. special meetings of 

San Francisco 
Chapter, American Institute of Archi- 
tects. 



Emit de Neuf 

Emil de Neuf, formerly San Francisco 
city architect, and head draughtsman for 
Architect G. A. Lansburgh of San Fran- 
cisco, was killed March 14th by a fall 
from the fourth floor of an unfinished 
building at 726 Sutter street, San Fran- 
cisco. His body was lying on the con- 
crete pavement of a rear court, and was 
found by Mathew White, a carpenter. 
The police were unable to discover how 
De Neuf came to fall. 

De Neuf served a short time as city 
architect five years ago, succeeding Lor- 
ing P. Ri.xford. He was 43 years of age 
and leaves a wife, two sons, and a 
daughter. 



Granted Certificates to Practice 

The following have been granted certi- 
ficates to practice by the Northern Dis- 
trict Board of the California State Board 
of Architecture: 

Ralph W. Armitage, 500 Clunie build- 
ing, San Francisco; Leland A. Bryant, 27 
San Jose avenue, San Francisco; William 
F. Bowen, Fresno; James H. Mitchell, 
717 Clayton street. San Francisco; Albert 
L. O'Brien, Clunie building, San Fran- 
cisco, and Fred H. Rcimers, 2125 Shattuck 
avenue, Berkeley. 



San Francisco Architectural Club 

Because of the great popularity of the 
present advanced class in Structural En- 
gineering, now completing a successful 
year of its work under the leadership of 
j\lr. R. S. Chew, the board of directors of 
the San Francisco .Architectural Club an- 
nounces the organization of an Element- 
ary Class in Structural Engineering, un- 
der the same instructorship. 



Big Chemical Plant 

The Chemical Pigment Co. has beer 
incorporated with a • capital stoi-k of 
$1,000,000. W. ,H. Covert, 810 Walnut 
avenue. Long Beach, one of the incorp''- 
rators, has informed the Lon.? Beach 
Chamber of Commerce that the company 
contemplates building a $250,000 plant for 
ihe manufacture of white lead. 



With the Architects and 
Engineers 



Antfriran JlttHtttutr of ArrljttwtB 

(ORGANIZED 1857) 

OFFICERS FOR 1914-15 

President R. Clipston Sturgis, Boston 

First Vice-President. .. .Thos. R. Kimball, 

Omaha, Neb. 

Second Vice-President. D. Knickerbocker Boyd. 

Philadelphia 

Secretary Burton L. Fenner, New York 

Treasurer T. L. Mauran, St. Louis 

) T. J D. Fuller. Washington. D. C. 

( Robert Stead, Washington, D. C. 



Audi- 



Board of Directan 

For One Year — Irving K. Pond, Chicago; .Tohn 
M. Donaldson, Detroit; Edward A. Crane, Phila- 
delphia. 

For Two Years— C. Grant La Farge, New 
York: Burt L. Fenner, New York; H. Van Buren 
Magonigle, New York. 

For Three Years— W. R. B. Willcox, Seattle, 
Wash.; Octavius Morgan, Los Angeles; Walter 
Cook, New York. 

San Francisco Chapter 

President W. B. Faville 

Vice-President Edgar A. Mathews 

Secretary-Treasurer. . . .Sylvain Schnaittacher 
_ I Henry A. Schulze 

Trustees j j^^ ^ rj,,o 

Southern California Chapter 

President Albert C. Martin 

Vice-President S. Tilden Norton 

Secretary Fernand Parmentier 

Treasurer August Wackerbarth 

Board of Directors 

J. E. Allison J. J. Blick 

J. J. Backus 



Portland, Ore., Chapter 

President A. E. Doyle 

Vice-President Folger Johnson 

Secretary Wm. G. Holford 

Treasurer J. A. Fouilihoux 

Council Members ! ^■°'a^*Na°ramoIe 

Washington State Chapter 

President Jas. H. Schack, Seattle 

Vice-President Jos. Cote, Seattle 

Vice-President Geo. Gove, Tacoma 

Vice-President L. L. Rand, Spokane 

Secretary Arthur L. Loveless, Seattle 

Treasurer Andrew Willatzen. Seattle 

( D. R. Huntington 
Members of Council •( W. R. B, Willcox 

' Jas. Stephen 



(Balifnnna ©tatp Soarb af Arrljttrrturr 

NOBTHERN DISTBICT. 

President John Bakewell, Jr. 

Secretary and Treasurer. Sylvain Schnaittacher 

J NO. Bakewell, Jr. Edgar A. Mathews 

Joseph C. Newsome 

SOUTHEBIT DISTBICT. 

President John P. Krempel 

Secretary-Treasurer Fred H. Roehrig 

I Octavius Morgan 

Members -. Sumner P. Hunt 

' Wm. S. Hebbarp 

&an Sfraiiriarn Arrhitrrtural (Club 

OFFICERS FOR 1914-15 

President Albert L. Lapachat 

\'ice-President Chas. Peter Weeks 

Secretary .\lbert R. Williams 

Treasurer William J. Helm, Jr. 

Directors 

T. L. Pflueger a. M. Loeventhal 

Thomas Bendell 

Coa Angrlrs Arcl;itrrtural (Ulub 

President .\rthur Rolland Kelly 

Vice-President Harry F. Withey 

Secretary-Treasurer Henry E. Bean 

Chairman Educational Committee 

John T. \'awter 

Chairman House and Entertainment Committees, 

Mossier of Atelier 

Gilbert Stanley Underwood 

S'an lifgn Arrljitrrtural Aaaoriatiiin 

President J. B. Lyman 

\'ice-President F. C. Cressy 

Secretary Robt. Halley, Jr. 

Treasurer G. A. Hauss'en 

Arrl|ttprt«ral Eragup nf tijp i^artfirdlaaat 

President. .Charles Peter Weeks, San Francisco 
Vice-Pres....John Bakewell, Jr., San Francisco 

Sec'y-Treas Aug. G. Headman, San Francisco 

Next Convention City— San Francisco. 

Store Building 

Architects Reid Bros, have made plans 
for a one-story Class C store building to 
be erected on Polk street, between Clay 
and Sacramento, San Francisco, for the 
Misses Allyne. 



New Espee Depots 

The engineering department of the 
Southern Pacific Co. is preparing working 
drawings for new passenger and freight 
depots for Modesto and Turlock. A con- 
tract for a new depot at Richmond re- 
cently has been let. 




^aniFrancisico ^ocietp 
of airctitectg 

Regular Meetings Second 
Wednesday of Each Month 



John Bakewell, Jr. 

Charles Peter Weeks 

William Otis Raiguel 

John Galen Howard and Louis C. Mullgardt 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Directors 

Committees; — „ „, „ 

Membershil^-Wu. C. Havs, Fred'k H. Meyer, and Geo. W Kelham. 

Architectural PraC.V.-JoHN Galen Howakd, Clarence R. Ward, and Houghton Sawyer. 

EZer'aiLcJ a,,d Program-Lovis C. Mullgardt, Chas. P. Weeks, and Louis P. Hobart. 

Allied ^r(j— LoRiNG P. Rixford, J. Harry Blohme, and Warren C. Perry. 

Publicity— Wm. Otis Raiguel, John J. Donovan, and E. Coxhead 

Erfiicadon— Bernard R. Maybeck, Arthur Brown, Jr., and John Baur. 

Competitions— Chas. P. Weeks, Wm . C. Hays, and John Reid, Jr. ^ ^ 

San Francisco Society of Architects February Meeting 



THE regular monthly meeting of the 
San Francisco Society of Architects 
was held at the University Club, Cali- 
fornia and Powell streets, on the evening 
of February 10th. with a good attendance 
of members, and as guests: Mr, O'Shaugh- 
nessy. the city engineer: ^tr. Henry 
Hornbostel of New York, Colonel Heth- 
erington, representing the state of Penn- 
sylvania at the Exposition; Mr. Trumbull, 
the artist who executed the mural paint- 
ings for the Pennsylvania building, and 
Mr. Stafiford L. Jory. 

The evening was devoted to a continu- 
ation of the discussion of "The Develop- 
ment of the Foot of Market Street." Mr. 
O'Shaughnessy gave an extremely inter- 
esting talk on the subject, illustrated with 
a number of plans which had been made 
by him as suggestions for remedying the 
present intolerable conditions. He also 
showed a number of photographs of 
similar work which had been done in 
European cities to accommodate traffic 
conditions and embellish the water fronts. 
Beginning with the first laying out of 
San Francisco in 1849 when it was a 
village of about 300 inhabitants, and cov- 
ering about 100 acres, he outlined the 
history of the growth and development 
of the city and its street traffic, bringing 
the subiect down to the present day with 
all the complexities and difficulties which 
have far outstripped the facilities for 
handling them. He went over the mani- 
fest difliculties attendant on any project, 
calling for the cooperation of the state 
as the owner of the San Francisco water 
front, the municipality and the United 
Railroads, but laid particular stress on 
the vital importance of the whole prob- 



lem and expressed the hope that the so- 
ciety and the architectural profession in 
San Francisco would interest themselves 
in its solution. 

A general discussion and presentation 
of several schemes followed. 

A unanimous vote of thanks was ten- 
dered Mr. O'Shaughnessy for his contri- 
bution to the evening's discussion. 

The chair announced that the business 
of the next meeting would consist of the 
execution of the articles of incorporation of 
the society. 

Stockton Moose and Hotel Buildings 

It now seems quite probable that a 
lar^e hotel will be erected next to the 
Moose building on South San Joaquin 
street, Stockton, from plans by .Architect 
Glenn Allen of San Francisco. The tota 
frontage will be 100 feet, and there will 
be a common entrance to both buildings, 
also elevator service and stairways. E-icb 
building will be five stories in height. 
The Moose will own their own structure 
and H. E. Williamson will own the other 
building. Construction will be Class C 

Architect's Office Abolished 

The Oregon State Board of Control has 
abolished the office of State Architect, and 
will hereafter, when work is required to be 
done, emplov \V. C Knighton, who has 
held the State office for the past four 
years. During that period he has super- 
vised the construction of ninety buildings, 
having an aggregate value of $1,395,000. 
The expenses of the department have 
amounted to $42,000, or a little more than 
3 per cent of the money expended. 



108 



The Architect and Engineer 



Exposition Architects Honored 

In a simple ceremony in the shadows 
of the massive colonnades of the Court 
of the Universe the Exposition director- 
ate on February 2Sth paid tribute to the 
men whose creative genius has made 
possible the walled city of beauty in 
which the world is celebrating a great 
achievement. The men honored were 
architects, sculptors and others, and the 
day was designated as designers' day. 

President Moore of the Exposition 
made the opening speech, in which he 
called attention to the fact that the crea- 
tive genius that had builded expositions 
in the past had gone without public 
honor. 

"This is the first time in the history of exposi- 
tions that the men whose art and genius have 
been responsible for their creation have been duly 
honored." he said. "The courage and energy anti 
devotion which the designers have shown througlv 
out the long months from the very beginning until 
the hour of completion have won the admiration 
of all who have been thrown in close contact with 
the Exposition. 

"This work is the triumph of art in exposition 
building. It is almost divine, and the good that 
this work will do for the people through the years 
to come will be far greater than we today realize." 

George W. Kelham, chief of architec- 
ture, was then called upon to reply for 
the designers. 

"We have found a sympallie'ic client in the 
Exposition." said Kelham. "This ceremony is 
but one brief link in a long span of endeavor 
which resulted in the finished Exposition. The 
la.st few months have been comparatively easy: 
the real hardships were in the beginning. 

" 'Whv don't you make the dirt fly?' was the 
most frequently put query we heard on the street 
and elsewhere during the earlv months. If the 
people couldn't see an army of men at work here 
in thfse days, they thought that everything was 
all wrong, and even doubted whether or not the 
Exposilion would be actually built. During the 
last few months, however, we have had everyone's 
support and it has been gratefully received.' 

"My only reeret is that Guerin and Bacon and 
some of the others who have had their place in 
this work were not able to be here at this time 
to receive this honor along with the rest of us." 

A bronze plaque, suitably engraved, 
was presented to each of the following 
designers: 

George W. Kelham, W. B. Faville, L. C. 
Mullgardt, Arthur Brown, Jr., Clarence R 
Ward, B. R. Maybeck, A. Stirling Calder, 
William R. Mead, Karl Bitter, Thomas 
Hastings, R. D. Farquhar, John McLaren, 
Henry Bacon, Jules Guerin and William 
R. Mead. 



Two Oakland Residences 

Architects Schimer & Bugbee, Dalziel 
building, Oakland, have designed a two- 
storv and basement frame and plaster 
residence on Ashmont avenue, Crocker 
Highlands, Oakland, for Mrs. S. W. 
Shores. The house will have hardwood 
floors throughout, mahogany trim down 
stairs, two bathrooms finished in tile, 
aufomatic water heater, hot air furnace, 
lirick entrance, etc. The same architects 
are preparing plans for a $20,000 resi- 
dence at Rockridge. 



Mission Architecture at the Exposition 

(From the San Francisco Chronicle) 
The use of the Mission style of archi- 
tecture for exposition purposes was a 
subject of considerable discussion when 
the proposal was first made, but now that 
the California building is in full swing 
there are few structures which from both 
the outside and inside views are more 
admired. All fears that the interiors 
might prove too somber for the festival 
.spirit have been found groundless. There 
is the happiest possible combination of 
reverential restfulness in the outlines and 
California industries in the exhibits. 



Architectural Competition 

The Los Angeles City Planning Associa- 
tion has adopted a resolution approving the 
plan of President Whiffen of the City Coun- 
cil to institute an architectural competition 
for plans for the development of the Nor- 
mal School property which now belongs to 
the city. Prizes will be offered to the 
competitors submitting plans. The City 
Planning Association has offered in the 
resolution to co-operate with President 
Whiffen in arranging the details of the 
competition. 



Fireproof Apartments 

Architects Train & Williams of Los 
.\ngeles are preparing plans for a live- 
story and basement reinforced concrete 
apartment building to be erected on the 
corner of Orange Grove avenue and Ele- 
vado drive, Pasadena, for F. R. Kellogg 
Co., 521 Douglas building, Los Angeles. 
The structure will be in the shape of a 
letter H and will cover an area of 170 
feet square and contain 196 rooms in 
suites of three, four and six rooms. Cost. 
$150,000. 



Examination of Architectural Draftsmen 

To fill positions with the California State 
Department of Engineering, tlie Board of 
State Harbor Commissioners and all other 
positions of the same class and grade, an 
examination will be held in Sacramento on 
March 27th. The salaries will range from 
$1200 to $1800 per annum. There is a great 
deal of prospective architectural work for 
the State which will require men of this 
class. 



Honor for J. J. Donovan 

City Architect J. J. Donovan will be the 
first speaker in the Oakland Municipal 
auditorium on its completion. He has 
accepted an invitation from the National 
Educational Association to talk on the 
first day of the association's gathering 
in .\ugust. Donovan will speak on 
"School Grounds and School .Architec- 
ture." 



Till- Architect and Engineer 



109 



San Francisco General Contractors' 
Association 

The new Board of Directors of the Gen- 
eral Contractors' Association of San Fran- 
cisco has elected the following officers for 
the ensuing year : 

A. H. Bergstrom. president ; Grant Fee. 
vice-president ; Charles Wright, treasurer ; 
William E. Hague, secretary. 

Mr. Bergstrom, the new president, is a 
partner of the well known general con- 
tracting firm of Lange & Bergstrom. whose 
activities in the building business of San 
Francisco during the last eight years have 
placed them in the front rank as responsible 
builders. 

The members of the new Board of Di- 
rectors are as follows: -A. H. Bergstrom. 
Grant Fee. Thos. B. Goodwin. Harvey A. 
Klyce, Chas. J. U. Koenig, William Linden, 
.\. F. Lindgren. Ralph McLaren. Clarence 
M. Moore. E. T. Thurston. Ch.irlcs Wright. 



Former State Architect Weds. 
W. D. Coates, Jr., former state archi- 
tect, and Miss Edna Richardson of Fruit- 
vale were married in San Francisco Feb- 
ruary 20 by Rev. W. K. Guthrie of the 
First Presbyterian Church. Only mem- 
bers of the couple's family were present. 
Shortly after the wedding Mr. and Mrs. 
Coates left for a trip to Los .\ngeles and 
San Diego. Thej- will reside in Fresno, 
where Mr. Coates is supervising architect 
of the new school buildings being erected 
there. 



Apartment House 
Architect A. W. Burgren of San Fran- 
cisco has prepared plans for a four-story 
Class C apartment house to be erected 
on Geary street, near Hyde. San Fran- 
cisco, at an estimated cost of $50,000. 
The building will be 50 -x 137'/z feet and 
will contain forty apartments of two and 
three rooms each. The proposition has 
been financed. 



Building for City Delivery Co. 

.Architects Cunningham & Politeo of 
San Francisco have completed drawings 
for a two-story Class C loft building, to 
be erected at Eddy and Hjde streets. San 
Francisco, for the City Delivery Co.. in 
which the Samuels Bros., formerly of the 
D. Samuels Lace House, arc interested. 
The estimated cost is S25.000. 



Pomona Apartment House 

.\rchitect C. E. Wolfe of Pomona has 
recently completed plans for a two-story 
store and apartment building to be built 
on Grand and Garey avenues, Pomona. 
There will be oak floors in the principal 
rooms, beam ceilings, etc. Peter Mon- 
tano is the owner. 



To Build Court House 
Susanville. Lassen countj-. is planning 
to build a new court house at a cost of 
$100.COO, and a county hospital to cost 
$20,CCO. The supervisors have passed a 
resolution to that effect and the ta.xpayers 
will be asked to vote the necessarj' bonds 
at an election to be called soon. The 
new board of supervisors is as follows: 
George W. McDow, chairman, Susan- 
ville; J. H. McClelland. Standish; George 
B. Levitt, Levitt; H. E. Wood, Berber; 
Willis Brockman, Madeline. 



New Fresno Hotel 

Construction has been started on the 
new Fulton hotel at Fresno to replace the 
building burned last summer. Structure 
will be two stories and basement, 50 x 150 
feet, steel frame and brick walls, and will 
cost $30,000. The hotel will be owned by 
Mrs. Mary Fulton, and has already been 
leased by the Grand Central Hotel Co. 
R. L. Felcher is the architect. 



$60,000 Residence 
.\rchitect Louis P. Hobart has com- 
pleted plans and taken figures for the 
construction of a three-story and base- 
ment residence at 2970 Broadway, San 
Francisco, for Mrs. Sidney Ehrnian. The 
interior will be finished in marble and 
hardwoods, while the exterior will be 
pressed brick and terra cotta. Provision 
for a ball-room is made in the basement. 
The house will probably case $60,000. 

Insurance Company to Build 
It is stated that one of the large insur- 
ance companies in San Francisco is about 
to erect a building of its own on the lot 
on the north side of California street, be- 
tween San some and Montgomery, and 
opposite the Merchants' Exchange build- 
ing. The lot is said to have sold for 
$100,000. 



Claremont Hotel 
The Claremont Hotel, originally de- 
signed by Architect C. W. Dickey of Oak- 
land and never completed owing to lack 
of funds, is to be finished at once and 
opened to the public in May. John Car- 
son of Oakland has prepared the plans 
and will superintend the work. 



Addition to Bank Building 

The Bank of Martinez directors have 
decided to construct a two-story building 
adjoining the bank at Martinez. 

Monterey Masonic Temple 

Architect John Davis Hatch. Humboldt 
Bank building. San Francisco, has let a 
contract to F. F. Moore of San Francisco 
to build a two-story frame and plaster 
Masonic Temple at Monterey. The cost 
is imder $WMQ. 



no 



1 he Architect and Eng^ineer 



News From the Front 

Architect Albert R. Walker of Los 
Angeles has received a letter from Archi- 
tect Fernand Parnientier of the same city 
containing the good news that in spite 
of tlie hardships of a winter campaign 
in the European war, he is faring well 
physically and is looking forward to his 
return to this country. The letter, which 
was written January 25, and received 
February 12, follows: 

January 25, 1915. 
My De.^r Walker: 

I have received your letter of December 31st, 
1914, advising me of my elevation to Fellowship 
in the Institute. It is a great comfort to receive 
news testifying the kindly remembrance of my fel- 
lows in California and the Institute while here 
amidst our grim surroundings. 

I am not permitted to go into many details nor 
write lengthy letters, but our hardships have in- 
creased many times with the advent of the winter. 
I shall have much to tell when I return, and 
should I fail to do so, my last thoughts shall be 
with gratitude to my fellow professionals who have 
been so kind to me, and the Fellowship in the In- 
stitute I shall Prize above all other things to the 
last moment. 

We become accustomed to look with indifference 
upon scenes, which in time of peace would fill us 
with horror, and every once in a while, another 
comrade fails to respond to roll call, with whom 
but a few moments before we exchanged friendly 
words. 

I am still in good health and gaining in strength 
and power of resistance, for all of which I am 
truly grateful. 

My kind remembrance to all my fellows of the 
Chapter. Sincerely, 

(Signed) Fernand Parmentier. 

My present official form of address is 
Fernand Parmentier, Caporal, 

74 ieme Regiment d' Infanterie, 6 ieme 
Compagnie, 

Section Postal No. 155, 
France. 



Oakland Skyscraper 

It is authoritatively announced that 
work will shortly begin on the construc- 
tion of a $600 000 fourteen-story office 
and theater building at the northeast cor- 
ner of Foui^eenth and Franklin streets, 
Oakland, from plans by Architect Carl 
Werner of San Francisco, formerly of 
O'Brien & W^erner. 

The building is to be erected by the 
Archon Co., of which J. F. Carlston, R. 
M. Fitzgerald, W. H. L. Hynes, Charles 
P. Hall and E. J. Downer are directors. 
It has been leased for a period of ten 
years by J. R. H. Jacoby and H. S. 
Merritt, formerly picture film manufac- 
turers of Seattle. The theater will be 
conducted by the Turner & Dahnken syn- 
dicate and will be the most ambitious and 
most elaborately appointed moving pic- 
ture house west of New York City. 

Of Italian renaissance architectural de- 
sign with two upper and two lower 
stories of cream colored terra cotta and 
the main body of the building of light 
buff pressed brick, the structure will 
prove one of the handsomest in the west. 
The lobby of the theater will be of espe- 
cially elaborate finish of Botticino marble 
and Caen stone with a base of black and 
gold marble. 



Engineers Elect Officers 

The annual meeting of the Engineers' 
and Architects' Association of Southern 
California was held in January at the 
three-story reinforced concrete ware- 
house of John A. Roebiing's Sons Co. 
After an inspection of the building under 
the guidance of Manager Ira J. Francis 
and his staff, the guests were adjourned 
to the Jonathan Club. The election of 
oflicers resulted as follows: 

Sainuel Storrow, president; .■\. H. Koe- 
big. first vice-president; W. A. E. Xoble, 
second vice-president ; Arthur S. Bent. J. 
J. Backus, A. S. Martin and Kenneth Sib- 
ley, directors. 



Carnegie Library 

.Architects Fabre & Bearwald, Mer- 
chants' National Bank building, San 
Francisco, have coiupleted drawings for 
a one-story and basement library build- 
ing to be erected at Willitts, at a cost of 
$8,000. Construction will be brick with 
slate roof, and hot air heating. 

The same architects are preparing 
sketches for a store and flat building of 
frame construction to be erected close to 
the fair grounds at an estiinated cost of 
$8,500. 



Personal 

J. C. Morrell, A. R. I. B. A., represent- 
ing the government of Victoria, Aus- 
tralia, was a recent visitor to San Fran- 
cisco and called at the office of this 
magazine to pay his compliments. Mr. 
Morrell is the Government Architect, 
Pijblic Works Department, of Melbourne, 
Victoria, Australia. He has been spend- 
ing considerable time for his government 
traveling in the interest of city and town 
planning. 



Women's Club House 

•Architects Bliss & Faville of San Fran- 
cisco have been commissioned to prepare 
plans for a splendid club building for the 
Women's Athletic Club. It will be 
erected on Sutter street and will com- 
bine gymnasium, plunge and general club 
rooms. By the time construction work 
is commenced it is hoped to have a rnem- 
bership of 1,000 women. Mrs. Lawrence 
Harris is secretary of the club. 



San Mateo County Mansion 

.Architects Willis Polk & Co. of San 
Francisco have prepared sketches for a 
costly country house to be erected in San 
Mateo county for Mrs. George Cameron, 
daughter of the publisher, M. H. de "Voung. 
Mr. Cameron is the head of the Santa Cruz 
Portland Cement Company. 



Wingfield May Build Mansion 

It is reported that the Goldfield million- 
aire mining man and banker, George 
Wingfield, will erect a mansion in San 
Francisco. 



Review of Recent Books 

of Interest to the 

Architectural and Engineering Professions 

By CHARLES HEXRY CHENEY 



MODERN CIVIC ART. Bv Charles Mulford 
Robinson. 

There is no contributor to the esthetic 
side of city planning and civic adornment 
more entitled to respect and a careful 
perusal of his work, than Mr. Robinson, 
who may be called the dean of city plan- 
ners in this countrj'. 

When this first appeared it was almost 
the onlj- work of an American on the 
subject, and while in the past ten years 
we have made great strides in citj' plan- 
ning, the present volume, now appearing 
in its third edition, contains a great deal 
not to be found elsewhere. 

It gives distinct impetus to the wide- 
spread movement for community com- 
fort, beautj- and attractiveness. It is a 
strong appeal for better things. 

Published by G. S. Putnam's Sons, Xew 
York. $3 net. 



INDIAN BLANKETS AND THEIR MAKERS. 
By George Wharton James. 

A splendid book on a subject of great 
interest to most Westerners. The fine 
color illustrations give one a distinctly 
better and more respectful idea of the art 
of the aborigines. It is indeed remark- 
able how far these people have gone, and 
Mr. James not only shows the motives of 
design and how they have been most 
naively carried out. but he has consist- 
ently reproduced blankets of a higher ar- 
tistic merit than is generally appreciated 
to exist, as well as photographs of the 
methods of weaving. This is a work of 
merit, interesting and worthy of any 
man's librarv. 

Published bv A. C. McClurg & Co.. 
Chicago, 1914. 120 illustrations and 213 
pages. Price, $4 net. 



MODERN GOTHIC .ARCHITECTURE. By T. 
Francis Bumpus. 

.■Mthough this volume contains some 
reproductions of modern architecture in 
England, it is more trulj- a glossary or 
hand book of Gothic architecture, traced 
from the Byzantine and Italian-Roman- 
esque, through the .-Xnglo-Norman and 
various periods of English Gothic. 

While written entirely from the Eng- 
lish point of view, it contains numerous 
photographs of the best English churches 
of all periods. 

Published by Dodd, Mead & Co.. 1914. 
143 illustrations. 359 pages. $3 net. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE IMPERIAL HE.KLTH 
CONFERENCE. London, 1914. 

That one-third of such a conference 
should be taken up in a discussion of 
housing and town planning is significant 
of the trend of the times in England, 
where communitj' spirit and community 
action have taken up actively these most 
important problems. The papers by Ray- 
mond Unwin and others are full or practi- 
cal suggestions and carefully thought out 
proposals for handling the difficult ques- 
tions of land values, more open spaces 
between houses and the effect of bad 
housing upon public health. Xo doubt 
the great advancement in England, 
through the Garden City Movement, for 
better housing, is due to fhe wide interest 
and unselfish work of all professions and 
parties. Such reports are full of sugges- 
tion for getting city planning started in 
this country. 

Published by the Victoria League. No. 
2 Milbank House, Westminster, London. 
S. W. 



HOW TO FR.\ME A HOUSE.— By Owen B. 
^[aginnis. 

This is the seventh edition of the 
author's now standard treatise on house 
and roof framing. It is an able dis- 
cussion of the best methods to em- 
ploy in American "balloon" framing. 
The work is enlarged over previous edi- 
tions with many added chapters of in- 
terest to the builder. A chapter on 
"Rustic Carpentry and Joinery" is inter- 
esting and valuable, especially to Coast 
builders interested in slab and half-log 
construction. 

Published by the William T. Comstock 
Co.. Xew York. 



Other Books Received 
CONCRETE STONE M.\NUFACTURE. Bv Har- 
vev Whipple. Published bv Concrete-Cement 
-\ge. Detroit. Postpaid. $1. 
THE IMPROVEMENT OF TOWNS AND 
CITIES. Bv Charles Mulford Robinson. Put- 
nam. Ne«- York. $1.25 net. 



Shea & Lofquist to Be Supervising 
Architects 

.\rchitects Shea & Lofquist of San Fran- 
cisco have been cominissioned to supervise 
the construction of the new Hall of Justice 
at Sacramento. They will act as a consult- 
ing board, and their duties will be similar 
to those of Messrs. Howard, Meyer and 
Reed of San Francisco. 




Heating and Lighting 



Plumbing and Electrical Work 

Edited By CHARLES W. FORTUNE 



Development in Heating and Ventilating 
Industrial Buildings* 



By E. L. HOGAN. 



THE industrial building of today is heated 
by one of three methods : direct steam ; 
direct hot water ; or by forced circulation 
of air which is heated b}' heaters, supplied 
by steam or hot water, and centrally lo- 
cated. The greater number are heated by 
direct steam because it can be installed 
by any steam fitter and frequently the 
superintendent with his millwright and 
other help can do the work. They know 
more about his system than any other and 
are not keen for metliods the}' do not fully 
understand. 

In certain lines of industry where moist- 
ure from some drying process or otherwise, 
must be absorbed by the air within, the 
blower or hot blast system is most efficient 
because by means of it the moisture is re- 
moved by the circulation of the air that 
heats the building. Also in buildings where 
smoke or gases must be removed, the 
forced circulation is desirable. 

In order to study the movement of air 
currents let us assume a building as illus- 
trated in Fig. 1. This could be used as a 
foundry, machine shop, car shop, structural 
steel plant or forge. The side walls are of 
concrete blocks and glass set in steel sash ; 
the frame work is of steel, the floor of con- 
crete ; the roof of reinforced concrete with 
composition roofing cover. 

The natural air currents in the structure 
would be as indicated by small arrows in 
the illustration. This movement is caused 
by the difference in temperature of the air 
within ; that coming in contact with the 
cold roof, monitors and outside wall be- 
comes cooler and heavier, and consequently 
falls. The warmer air in contact with the 
floor rises and circulation is set up tending 
to equalize the inside and outside tempera- 
ture. 

From a heating standpoint we are inter- 
ested in a strata covering the lower eight 
feet of the interior. This must be kept 
comfortable and fairly uniform. It can be 
accomplished by creating currents in the 

* Paper presented at tlie recent Annua] Meet- 
ing of the .Xmerican Society of Heating and \'en. 
tilating Engineers. 



upper portion of the building so that no cold 
air will reach the floor, taking care of the 
outside walls by radiant heat from radiators 
placed above and out from the walls, or 
below and on or near the walls, and taking 
care of the lower strata of air by heat from 
the hot strata above. This method is prac- 
tically keeping the exposed surface of the 
structure warm so that there will be no 
cold currents in the working portion. 

In structures of this kind where the peak 
of the roof is 40 feet or SO feet above the 
floor and a working temperature of 65 de- 
grees near the floor is inaintained, the tem- 
perature near the peak will be approx- 
imately 90 degrees. While it is apparent 
that by keeping the exposed surface warm 
or keeping a layer of warm air next to it, 
that the inside of the structure will be 
warm, nevertheless, it would seem as though 
it would be better to keep the working 
strata warm and do so in such a way as to 
prevent the cold currents from entering this 
strata. This would reduce the temperature 
of the air in proximity to the cold exposed 
surface and decrease the heat loss from the 
building. 

In order to produce results like this it 
would be necessary to continually mix hot 
air with the air in the working strata in 
order to maintain a working temperature. 
In. this system the hotter portion of the 
building is the lower, and the radiant heat 
is up and toward the exposed surfaces. Air 
mi.xes or diffuses very rapidly and sufficient 
air must be circulated in the lower working 
strata to maintain a uniform temperature. 
Such a system is what is aimed at with hot 
blast and what is frequently obtained. It is 
surprising how well and with wdiat a little 
heating surface and consequent small steam 
consumption you can heat a building in 
this way. 

A distributing system which would ap- 
proximate these results is indicated on this 
plate in Fig. 2. 

Frequently it is attempted to heat a 
structure like this with a hot blast system 
liy simply having outlets in the mains and 
no